100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 20, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NHIL MICI

IIGAN DAILY

10

mom"m

C. &K.

| An Exceptional Value in

Necwear

Spring Showing
of the
Crofut & Knapp Hats
$3.50 and $4.00
See Our Windows for
Shapes and Colors
TINKER & COMPANY
Cor. S. State and William Sts.

C. & K.

SOCIETY BRAND

and Top Coats for Spring

SUITS

At Sixty-five Cents

You Can't Beat It-See Our North Window
On State Street

C..&K .

C.& K.

Wadhams & Co.

State Street

Arcade

Your Floral Needs==
Are BEST.SA ISFIEDJy Us
PHONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION
=COUSIN5&IiALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.
embers of Florists "Telegraph DeliveryAssociation

-

When You Break Your Glasses
Go to Haller & Fuller's
STATE STREET JEWELERS
Because you get prompt service and Have Your
Lenses Accurately Ground.
ill l1!I 111! 1111Illl i(I11111 1 !( 111111111 !{(1111 11 li II1111 11I(l 11111 ( ( !Il 1ilI( I!~ 1 1
Safer" Than
Currency to Carry
has often been remarked when talking of-
K. N. & K. TRAVELERS' CHECKS
Experienced Travelers Use Them
Checks not cotintersigned may be replaced if lost.
Convenient for the college man tray- Considering the pro etion afforded, _
= cling individually or with his team. their cost is iasini Wnt.=
Denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $1ClOat a premium of SOc.-
on one hundred dollars' worth.-
Get theifro r x ia bank or wri efor full particulars.
Knauttj.Natob &Kuhnj
EQUITABLE BUILDING NEW YORK CITY
Iflllli~ l(11i1111I~l1 III1111i1{(!(111111(!1~ llllllli111111111111( !( 1 |1 1 1|1|1(illllllIll1| 11 lIi|l|l|l|l| i--

INTELLIGENCE BUREAU
RECEIS ,000 CARDS
WORK OF FLING REPLIES AND
INTERNAL ORGANIZATION
BEING HURRIED
Between 5,000 and 6,000 registration
cards of alumni, students, and faculty
members already have been received
at the Union by the intercollegiate in-
telligence bureau.
The cards are being filed as rapidly
as possible. The national headquar-
ters in Philadelphia is making ar-
rangements with the government so
that the data will be available for the
use of the government within a couple
of weeks.
The internal organization of the lo-
cal branch of the bureau is being com-
pleted as rapidly as possible, all of
the corps' chiefs working on their re-
spective divisions. The internal or-
ganization will tabulate the facilities
of the University, thus placing the
complete record of the resources of
the University, both physical and
mental, before the government at the
same time. The internal organiza-
tion is as follows:
Staff corps-Chief, President Harry
B. Hutchins, committee on organiza-
tion and procedure.
Medical corps-Dr. V. C. Vaughan,
chief; hospital, hospital organization,
Red Cross and nursing, pharmacolog-
ical, dental, veterinary, biological, bot-
any, zoology, physiology, laboratory.
Legal corps-Chief, Dean H. M:
Bates; international law, military law,
admiralty law, civil law.
General science corps-Chief, Prof.
S. L. Bigelow; minerals and areas,
geology, geography and topography,
mining, metallurgy, chemistry, phys-
ics, mathematics and astronomy, math-
ematics, astronomy.
Engineering corps-Chief, Prof. J.
A. Bursley; chemical engineering, civil
engineering, electrical engineering,
marine engineering, rfechanical engi-
neering, sanitary engineering, draft-
ing skilled labor, aviation, fine arts,
architecture, music, art.
Economics and social service corps
-Chief, Prof. I. L. Sharfman; gener-
al economics, foods and agriculture,
industry, finance, social service and
social organization, statistics, histor-
ical science.
Language corps--Chief, Prof. J. R.
Effinger; English, Germanic, romance,
French, Spanish, Italian, Rumanian,
slavonic, other languages.
Military training corps-Chief, Prof.
L. M. Gram; reserve officers' training
corps, army; reserve officers' train-
ing corps, navy.
Publicity corps--Chief, Mr. Lyman
L. Bryson.
Information bureau-Prof. Philip E.
Bursley.
STUDENTS' SOCIETY RESUME
SUNDAY NIGHT MEETINGS
Sunday night lectures will be re-
sumed by the Students' society of the
Unitarian church, beginning next Sun-
day evening, when three senior mem-
bers of the society will talk of "The
Rulation of Students to War."' These
speakers will be Ralph Jennings, '17E,
Jacob Stern, '17, and Max Blumer,
'17M. The meeting will be held in
the church parlors at the corner of
Huron and State streets, and the pub-
lic is cordially invited.
Regular assembly at Armory Satur-
day night.-Adv. 19-20

TWIN.E ARRIAY OF AINI'lsT
SPONSIBLE FOR IN'II?-
E Sr

RE-

The twenty-fourth annual May Fes-
tival is close at hand and in two
weeks it will have become part of the
musical history of Ann Arbor. From
the interesting program announced
the Festival promises to be extremely
entertaining.
The seat sale this year is the largest
it has ever been. This, however, is
not surprising when it is recalled that
in previous years it has been the cus-
tom to provide one star and to make
the rest of the solo parts from music-
ians of a lower standing, while this
year it has become possible to provide
a cast of a dozen of the foremost art-
ists of the musical world.
Such artists as 11iomer, Calli-Curci,
Matzenauer, Hinshaw, De Luca, Alaud
Fay, Martinelli, Kinston, Christine
Miller, Leginska, Imig, and Holmquist,
with the Chicago Symphony orchestra
of 70 men, the University Choral union
and the children's chorus of 400 voices,
are the best which the world affords.
Dr. A. . Stanley, in arranging the
program, has kept in mind the diver-
sified desires of the audiences. The
Choral union will give "The Dream of
Gerontius," long looked upon as one of
the most important 'of modern com-
positions, Thursday evening, the solo
parts being taken by Christine Miller,
contralto, Morgan Kingston, tenor, and
Gustaf Hohquist, bass. On Satur-
day evening the Choral union will
render Ve rdi's opera, "Aida," which
will be interpred by a cast made up
of the leading artists of the Metropol-
itan Opera company.
On Friday afternoon a varied pro-
gram will be given. The children will
offer as their contribution, Fletcher's
"Walrus and the Carpenter," which
was given at the 1913 Festival. Since
that time this work has been given by
choral societies all over the country
and there have been many demands
for its repetition in Ann Arbor. On
this same program will be Ethel Leg-
inska, the sensational Russian pianist,
who will perform with the Chicago
Symphony orchestra, her contribution
being Rubenstein's "D minor Concer-
to."
Friday evening, Gali-Curci, the
Spanish-Italian soprano, whose career
this season has been spectacular, will
appear. Coming to this country last
fall an unknown singer, she has, in the
course of one season, made herself1
probably the best known soprano of'
the country..
At the opening concert Wednesday
evening Madame Louise homer, will
sing several of the operatic arias for
which she has become famous.
On Saturday afternoon the famous
organ in Hill auditorium will be play-
ed by one of the leading American
organists, Richard Keys Biggs. Ie is
a graduate of the University School of
Music, was a student in the University
for several years, and has a host of
friends in this city and in Detroit.
where he occupied several of the large
church positions before going to New
York. During the San Francisco and
San Diego expositions he wvdn great
distinction for the recitals he gave in
both cities.
The organ program will be varied
by several numbers sung by Anna
Schram-Imig of Sheboygan, Wisconsin.
a student for the past two years under
Theodore Harrison at the School of

FESTIVL SEAT SALE
BREAKS ALL RECORDS

MAIN AND LIBERTY
TYPEWRITERS
For Rent or Sale

Come in and see our new line of Spring Hats and
Furnishings.
We make Suits to your measure from $16.50 up,
NEXT ro ORPHEUM
FOR ELECTRIC REPAIRS
OF ALL KiNDS CALL
Washtenaw Electric Shop
The Shop o Quality
It its not Rigft we make It Right
Phone 273 200 East Washington St.
CULTIVATING THE CLOTHES SENSE-
No way to do it but to see as many clothes as pos-
sible that are excellently made-of well-combined
colors-and of graceful lines.
Coming to the Hutzel Shop often will show you
what to wear and how to wear it.
Hutzel 's

m

SPRING

Typewriting
MAlu1igraphing

Hats & Caps

I

Hamilton P" s College
State an .lai

In new Shades and

on

Shapes

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
System

TYRONE-W/ in.
ARROW
.form-fit
COLLAR
TOPS AND BANDS ARE CURVE CUT
TO FIT THE SHOULDERS' 2 for 30c
CLUETT,PEABODY&CO.fiZCMAKERS

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Co.

27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

Music, this year having served as a
member of the teaching faculty. H1er
appearances in Chicago and elsewhere
have attracted favorable commenda-
tion.
ciy News
City health Officer J. A. Wessinger
reported two new cases of scarlet
fever yesterday. They are Melvin
Camps, 110 North Ingalls street, and
liss Melmar Mooney, 326 Catherine
street. Both were taken to the contag..
ious hospital yesterday.
Ann Arbor merchants may close.
their stores one afternoon each week
during July and August, according to
reports circulating .in the city yester-
day. Trho committee appointed by
John Theurer, lpresidlent of the Merch-
ants' Credit association, met Wednes-
day to consider the advisability of
such a iplan. it was decided at this
meeting that a. referendum vote will
be taken among citizens regarding
this closing and those opinions will
be read at the next meeting of the 'as-
sociation which is to be held on May
3. The question of closing all stores
at 9 o'clock Saturday night during the
year, except through the holiday sea-
son, and at 8 o'clock during July and
August will also be considered.
'I'AI IIANY DELEGATION QUITS
LIQUOR PROHIBITION FIGHT
Washington, April 19.-After a fight
during which the Tammany delegation
walked out, house Democrats in caucus
late this afternoon rescinded a previ-
ous caucus vote by which they had
agreed to consider immediately a bill
by Representative Howard of Georgia
to prohibit the manufacture or sale of
liquor during the war.
Purdue Seniors Aid in Consert'ation
Lafayette, Ind., April 19.- Twenty-
two seniors of the Purdue agricultural
deartment, have been sent out by the
university to aid in the conser-vation of
food resources in the state.
They have been sent to counties
which have no agricultural advisor
and will organize the work for betterj
efiiciency in farming. More will be i
sent out later.
F. Way, '17, anno-unees Engagement
Frances A. Way, '17, announced her
engagement to William F. Newton,
ex-'17, at a dinner party given in her
honor during spring vacation at the
home of her aunt, Mrs. George Con-
nor, of Battle Creek. The wedding will
probably take place in October. Mr.
Newton was a member of The Michi-!
gan Daily staff during 1914-15-16.
Special discount to class baseball
teams. Cushing's Pharmacy.-Adv.

II -

THE

Varsity Toggery

SHOP

1107 So. Univ. 1107 So. Univ.

1('OLL,,1e,( Es

l" YRM NEWS SERVICE

'N I

DEBATE COMPULSORY TRAINING
IN ALPIIA NU ROOMS TONIGHT
Adelphi and Alpha Nu freshman de-
bating teams will debate compulsory
military training at 7:30 o'clock to-'
night in the Alpha Nu rooms, U-hall.
The debate is for the possession of
the all-campus fresh cup for the con-

ing year.
The winner of the cup for three con-
secutive years obtains permane t pos-
session of it, Adelphi has won it for
thf past two years.
Have your shoes full-soled in leath-
er or Neolin. We specialise in this
work. O. G. Andres. 220 So. State. 13-6

S111ILAR TO ASSOCIATED PRESS
Colfax, Iowa, April 19.-Representa-
tives of 16 college newspapers met at
the convention of the new Iowa College
press which will now exchange news
between the colleges of the state.
A representative of the press will
be appointed by the editor of each
paper in the service and he will be
responsible for all news which orig-
inates at his college. The Associated
Press system has been followed in
the organization of the new service.
Colleges now members are: Ames,
Central, Iowa Wesleyan, Cedar Falls,
l Upper Iowa, Drake, Coe, Penn, Grin-
nell, Leander Clark, Des Moines, Iowa,
university, Iighland Park, Buena Vis-
ta, Eldlswortb, and Cornell.
AD11INLSTRATION TO REMOVE
SPY BILL PRESS CENSORShIP
Washington, April 19.-That the ob-
jectionable features of the newspaper
censorship laws in the administration's
spy bill will be withdrawn and the
censorship made much less strict than
provided for in the original measure
seemed certain this afternoon.
The administration, it was said, has
agreed to radical changes as to what
newspapers shall be permitted to pub-
lish. During debate this afternoon
Senator Johnson of California 'moved
to strike out the entire newspaper
clause in the bill.
JEWIS1 .STDENTS 10 NOT
x1O1D MEETING ON SUNDAY
The Jewish Student Congregation of
the University of Michigan will not
1hold its regular weekly services next
Sunday because of the annual student
service to be held at Temple -Beth
El, Detroit. This service is given
primarily for Jewish students of the
University, and is under the auspices
of the Young People's: society of
Temple Beth El.
iollrualisuc Sorority Abandons Meet
Lawrence, Kan., April 19.- Theta
Sigma Phi, national honorary journal-
ism sororhy, has postponed its conven-
tion from 1917 to 1918 because of the
present war crisis. The conclave was
to have been held on May 2, 3, and 4,
at the University of Kansas.

Leave Copy Leave Copy
at at
Quarry's and Students'
sThe Dita Supply Store
ADVERTISI.NG

WANTED
WANTED - Four ladies, preferably
with teaching experience, to work in
Dunkirk, New York. Good salary
for summer. Phone 359-M. 19-20-21
WANTED -Lady to woflin Kalam-
azoo for the summer. $80 j per
month. Phone 359-M. 19-20-21
LOS'S

FOR SALE
FOR SALE---War bargain--$100 type-
writer, almost' new, $24.50. Owner
leaving for front. School of Short-
hand, 711 N. University. 20-21-22
FOR SALE-A seventeen-foot Morris
Canoe in first class condition. Equip-
ment complete with locker space.
Call 1780. 18-19-20
.MISCELLANEOUS
PRIVATE BOARD-$5.00 weekly. 410
Church St. Phone 450-R. 4-22-in.

'i

Do You Know
THAT GRINNELL BROS. CAN SAVE YOU MONEY ON ANYTHING
In the Realm of Music!
ASK TO SEE THE NEW "RECOIRD LITE"
FOR VICTROLAS
Phone 1707 116 SO. MAIN ST. Phone 1707
Try our Record Approval Service

LOST--Dietzgen slide rule.
Piease call Rogers, 355.

No case.
20-21-22

'ST-Round-up pin. Please call 383

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan