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April 19, 1917 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


VI I III IvuuI
HITS AND SCORES
Reseri es and First String Men Play
0 to 0, Six-inning
tie
PARKS ALLOWS NO HITS;
GLENN LETS TWVO CONNECT

AL TUROUT OF GRID
MEN DISPPONTS YOST

COACH WANTS MORE MEN
FOR PRACTICE
TODAY

OUTI

May Play Saturday Afternoon;
ups Show Several
Changes

Dine.-I

In the first post-vacation clash be-
tween the Varsity and the Reservest
yesterday afternoon, the latter heldI
their opponents to a scoreless tie ins
six innings of play, with the Varsityf
unable to score a hit.,
Parks and Glenn engaged in a
pitching duel, the former twirling for
the Reserves, and the latter for the1
headliners, with the result adding to as
grand total of zero for each hurler ini
the way of runs The odds were with
Parks, who faced the hardest hitters1
and allowed no' hits. On the other
hand, he walked five men. Glenn walk-
ed only one batter, but allowed two
hits, one a double by Parks and the
other a single by Morrison. Both
pitchers retired six men by the air
route.
Johns Nearly Scores
Oiily one man got near home, but
Mattson nailed him at the plate.
Glenn walked Johns, who traveled
around to third on passed balls and
sacrifices and after being tagged off
the third sack by Horwitz through an
assist by Haidler and after being al-
lowed to stay on account of Haidler's
failure to report to the umpire when
he went into left field, completed the
rond by getting called out at home.
With the exception of two clean hits,
Glenn was never in danger but once,
when Johns tried to come in ' from
third. The Varsity came nearest scor-
ng in the first of the fifth, when
through walks and wild heaves three
men were lined up around the bases.
Walterhouse, batting after Niemann,
slammed out a hard drive that looked
like a good hit, but Kifchgessner at
second stuck his glove up and nailed1
the nearest thing to a hit the Var-
sity could unearth all afternoon.
Changes in Line-Up
Several changes in the lineup werec
noticeable. Middleditch played second"
for the Varsity. Dancer has not re-
ported owing to an attack of tonsilitis,
while Guy Reem failed to appear in
left field, Haidler, a catcher, took his
position. Morrie Dunne's place at
home was filled by Mattson.
On the Reserves, Birmingham was
absent at first, his place being filled
by Cooper. Kirchgessner was moved
in from the outfield to take Middle-1
ditch's berth. Larson at short and
King at third completed the infield.
Gariepy in right field, Johns at center,1
and Martin at left made up the out-'
field.<
Coach Lundgren stated that theret
would probably be a game between
the Varsity and a picked team from the
ineligibles and others. The coach ex-
pects to put the best team he can find
in against his proteges and the dope
points to a fast game about 3 o'clockl
next Saturday afternoon.
The teams batted in the following
order:t
Varsity: Niemann, r.f.; Walter-1
house, c.f.; Brandell, s.s.; Horwitz, 3b;'
Mattson, c.; Newell, 1b.; Middleditch,
2b.; Haidler, U.f.; Glenn, p.
Reserves: Johns, c.f.; Cooper, lb.;
Martin, l.f.; Morrison, c.; Larson, s.s.;
King, 3b.; Gariepy, r.f.; Parks, p.
Score: Varsity 0, Reserves 0. '
Struck out by Parks, 6; by Glenn,'
6. Bases on balls: by Parks, 5; by
Glenn, 1. Hits: off Parks, none; off!
Glenn, 2. Two base hits: Parks.
Singles: Morrison.
Notre Dame Expects Strong Team
Notre Dame will be represented in
the Pennsylvania relay carnival by
one of the fastest two-mile teams that
ever represented the middle west.
Notre Dame won the two-mile relay
against the best, colleges of the west
in 8:09 3-5, and on an outdoortrack
expects to get well under 8 minutes.
McDonough and Meehan expect to run

their halves in 1:58, and every man on
thenteam is said to be able to shade 2
minutes.

But 23 men were out for spring foot-
ball practice last night when Yostk
made his first appearance of the year.
The small number was highly disap-
pointing to the coach, but it is very1
probable that the rain kept many awayx
who would have come out if it had
not been for the damp weather.
The men who reported were put
through a hard drill for an hour and a
half. The war spirit is making itself
so greatly felt on the gridiron that
football seems to have taken a back
seat for the time being.
"There is nothing definite to say,
only that there will be practice to-
morrow night, .if the weather permits
and I desire to see a large number outl
in suits, ready to go through practice,"
said Coach Yost, when asked about
plans for the future.
x 23~
SPARKS.t
WILSON.t
SCHIUMAKER.
HAELLS.r
CADIWELL.
TUTTLE.t
DAVIES.
GILLESPIE.t
EMERY.
KNOX.
CULVER. /
RYCHENER.
FUTCH.t
ZASTROW.
WILLARD.
CRESS.
GOODSELL.1
ERNST.
WILLIAMS.
MABLEY.
SUTTLE.
MACLAUGhLIN.t
SOPH AND JUNIOR UTS
BOWL FORFIRST PLCE
SECOND YEAR MEN ARE FAVORED
IN MATCH FOR ALLEY l
TITLE
After two months' play, the six
teams in the interclass bowling league
have finished their schedules and the
final match will be rolled Saturday
night with the literary juniors and
sophomores facing each other for the
high honors.<
All dope seems to favor the younger i
lits, as the team is well organized and
has scored high consistent totals dur-
ing the season. The juniors have a1
quintet which has rounded into form1
during the last few games and a spurt .
is not totally impossible.]
This season has not proved as much
of a success as the former series. The
reason for this can probably be traced
to the numerous other events which
have claimed the attention of all dur-
ing the past month. The. success of
the soph lits is due mainly to their
organization and consistency in using
the same men throughout the series.
COSTS HARVARD A DOLLAR A
DAY TO RUN HER ATHLETICS
Cambridge, Mass., April 18.-The
annual report of Fred W. Moore, grad-
uate treasurer of the Harvard athletic
association, shows that in 1915-16 it
cost the Crimson just a little more
than a dollar a day, to conduct its ma-
jor and minor sports. Harvard's to-
tal receipts for the year were about
$155,000, but the expenses were some-
what above that sum.
The five major sports furnished a
revenue of approximately $145,500,
and the net profit was $55,555. Foot-

ball was the great money maker, the
receipts being $117,000 and the ex-
penses $37,600, a profit of nearly $80,-
000, but the other major sports, except
baseball, which netted $4,000, were
conducted at a loss. The athletic as-
sociation spent $18,000 out of its
pocket for varsity rowing.
The net expense of conducting the
so-called minor sports was $12,000.

sports were slightly more than $150
while the cost was about $8,500. What
brought the year's expenditure to so
high a total, however, was the outlay
of nearly $20,000 on the Soldiers' field
athletic grounds, including mainte-
nance. For the year 1914-15 Harvard's
athletic department was able to show
a profit of approximately $4,500, then
the slump came.
It is expected, however, that next
year's report, in which the big foot-
ball receipts of last November will be
included, will show a balance larger
by several thousand dollars than any
report in recent years.
Rifle lMen Finish
Lou Score Season
Michigan Sharpshooters to Practice
on Outdoor Range in
the Future
Lack of interest and insufficient
practice are responsible for the poor
showing which Michigan's sharpshoot-
ers made in the National Rifle as-
sociation's tournament which came to
a close recently.
According to the rules of the tourna-
ment, all the teams entered shot off
their matches on the home range. The
totals for the five highest targets were
considered as the team total, all the
totals for the entire contest going to
make up the grand average. There
were 10 matches. The team showing
the highest mark will be awarded the
championship.
The Wolverines showed up badly in
the beginning, turning in totals of
844, 849, 841, 849, and 847 out of a
possible 1,000. Toward the end of the
season, however, they began to
strengthen their marks and showed
totals of 871, 878, and 885. Michigan's
grand total for all the matches is
8,568. No official announcement has
been made, but it is thought that the
Wolverines will finish somewhere
among the first 10 teams..
Numerals will be awarded to the
men on the team if they finish well
up in the group.
The season for outdoor shooting is
close at hand. As soon as arrange-
ments can be made the team will start
practice on the state milita's outdoor
range.
WOMEN'S TENNIS FINALS TO
BE PLAYED IN A FEW DAYS
Louise Irish, '18, and Lucy Hoffman,
'20, Contend for Title of Last
Fall
Finals in the women's tennis tourna-
ment of last fall which were never
played off because of the premature
approach of cold weather will take
place in a few days. Louise Irish, '18,
and Lucy Hoffman, '20, are contenders
for the title.
Work on the courts is now going
on and they should be in readiness
for use by the end of the week. The
Newberry courts are open at all times
to University women, while those on
Palmer field are open all day Wednes-
day and Saturday and on other days
when not in use by the regular class-
es.
Lists now posted at Barbour "gym
for the spring tournament should be
signed by tomorrow noon. Margaret
Atkinson, '19, is tennis manager of
the athletic board.
Regular assembly at Armory, Satur-
day night.-Adv. 19-20
For fine Watch Repairing, J. L.
Chapman, Jeweler, 113 Main St.-Adv.
Tues. e.o.d.

COMPETITION BETWEEN
CLASSES

Track witnessed a formal resuscita-
tion yesterday when more than 20,
athletes hied themselves to Ferry field
for the first unlimbering process since
vacation. Nearly all those out were
freshmen.
The track was soggy from recent
rains, and the going was rather slow
as a consequence.
Coach Farrell wishes it understood
that the work is to begin in earnest
today, and looks for a big turnout of
both Varsity and freshmen. Although
the schedule for the rest of the' sea-
son is still in doubt, the coach wishes
the men to work in order that they
may keep in shape for whatever hap-
pens. If the suspension on all ath-
letics is not removed it is almost cer-
tain that track meets among the sev-
eral divisions of students in the Uni-
versity will be held.
Class meets will furnish the keen-
est sort of competition, and there is a
popular feeling that the freshmen
could give the older men the hottest
sort of run for honors in more than
one event. The number of seconds
and thirds the yearlings could gather
in events in which tlfey could not
score victories, might enable them to
leave the result in doubt up to the
last.
Captain Johnson should dispose of
the hurdles and broad jump to the
great satisfaction of the 1920 class,
while the half milers and 440-yard
men on the fresnmen would hold their
own without great difficulty. Other
events would find the yearlings amass-
ing some counters with either second
or third places.

FARRELL

HOPES TO

ARR;ANGE

TRACK MEN PRACTICE
ON SLOW, SOGGY PATH

oxing Club Will
Spar for Faculty
Instructors to be Entertained with
Four Bouts' on May
10
Provided the mailed fist does not
completely overshadow the padded
boxing glove at that time, May 10 will
see an exhibition of artistic fisticuffing
in honor of the faculty Faculty night
should rival the first exhibition of U.
B. C. in success.
As yet the boxers for this event have
not been selected. Four bouts of three
rounds each are planned. The desire
is not to infringe upon the instructors'
sleep, but to furnish much motion in
a limited time. Speed, action, and
footwork are promised.
Preliminary to the real business of
the evening, Mr. John Edmunds will
give an exhibition of shadow boxing in
multi-colored tights. Floyd A. Rowe
will be announcer, and every effort
will be made to give the guests of hon-
or an entertaining evening. A limited
number of seats will be placed on sale
to help defray the expenses of the
evening.
There is opportunity in The Michi-
gan Daily Ads. Read them.

A

Physical Examinations Postponed
Physical examinations for freshn
will be postponed until next week <
ing to the forced absence of Dr. Geo:
A. May, who has been called out
town on account of the death of
sister. Doctor May will not return
Ann Arbor before Monday.

-4 7

Y

I

I_

Make it Two!
Coca-Cola is always a mighty welcome sugges-
tion, whether the crowd's hot and "dry' or
just wanting a glass of delicious refresh-
ment. It's the favorite call of millions daily.
Demand the genuine by full name-
nicknames encourage substitution A
A ,. f,'TA f'!'1 A -rTy A 'TA-'A

540

IDartmouth Men Drop Work to Train
Hanover, N. H., April 18.-Under-
graduates enrolled in Dartmouth's mil-
itary training squads may drop any
three hours of work and receive full
credit for the study they drop. Actual
drill was started Monday afternoon
and two hours a day will be devoted
to the work from now on.

THE(.OCAc: t../ .11 .ANr, s.,

Correct Gradluatior
Fr ont, side and back vieuw
fashion number 295 "The I
= You may COnfidently look to us for We are sho
Sauthentic fashions; perfect fit; "classy" ful and exci
Sclothes. We make a business not only approved fa
Sof knowing what's correct, but of hay- rich; the wc
~ ng it ready for you for your selection. can fit and s
FRED W. GROS
Local dealers for Ed.V. Price & Co. Merch ant

4,.

I

Clothes

EARL Y.4 I WSAN .,1d1i

us of our
Mid-belt"

The nlta-1917 tennis balls.-Adv. The gross receipts from freshman

...

ff .

wing more than Soo beauti-
usive patterns and all the
.shions. The materials are
orkmanship perfect; and we
satisfy any man who comes.

Tickets at Busy Bee

Dancing 9 to 1

FRIDAY, APR. 20

D N CE
AT ARMORY
Fisher's "Jazz" Band

s

309
S. Main St.

Tailors

Chicago, U.S.A.

Admission $1.00

7. haljrdtrir--- ----M---gan---

70

Ta a'h; In dtnn street

Mich gan.men.

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