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April 19, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-19

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THE WEATHE
PROBABLY RAIN-
F N)WRE
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Ar Ar
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tr t 11 jDatt

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL, XXVIL No. 137 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRL 19, 1917. PRICE FIVE C

FIRST 500 MAN
LEVY MAY BE SENT
TO CAMPBY AUG.1
WAR DEPARTMENT PREPARES
PLANS EXPECTING QUICK
MOVE BY CONGRESS
7,000,000 BETWEEN
AGES OF 19 - 25 YEARS
Lot Will Decide Men Chosen; Wilson
May Employ Draft at Any Time
House Committee Votes
By Carl D.Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, April 18.-In anticipa-
tion of speedy action by congress on
the draft bill, the war department this
afternoon had nearly completed plans
to have the first levy of 500,000 men
in training camps before Aug. 1. The
first levy will be elected by lot.
Figures compiled by the department
show there are about 7,000,000 men
between the ages of 19 and 25 in the
country, of whom about 60 per cent
would be available for servive. From
this, by lot, the first levy would be
picked. It is planned to set the same
registration day throughout the na-
tion. Precincts will be made the places
of registration.
Later this afternoon the house mili-
tary committee instead of formulating
a substitute measure formally adopted
by 13 to 8 the amendment to the ad-
ministration bill, authorizing the
president to use the volunteer system
to get 500,000 men, but giving him ad-
ditional authority to employ the draft
system at any time.
The amendment is so worded that
the president could go ahead with the
selective conscription system without
recourse to the volunteer system pro-
vision. Some members said that if the
president should decide to put into ef-
feet the volunteer system first, and
then the selective conscription plan,
it would permit the raising of such
volunteer forces as Colonel Roose-
velt desires to organize. The house
committee this afternoon agreed to
change the eligible ages in the army
bill both for volunteers and conscripts
from 19 to 25 to from 21 to 40 years.
LAW STUDENTS MEET
Will Make Change in Drill Companies'
Organization Today
There will be a meeting of all the
students of the Law school at 4 o'clock
this afternoon in front of the Law
building for the purpose of making a
change in the organization of the drill
compnies.
According to plans made at a meet-
ing of the captains of the three com-
panies yesterday afternoon, the pres-
ent organization will be discontinued
and the law companies merged as
much as possible with those companies
which were formed during vacation.
Those men who have had one year's
training or its equivalent will be
eligible to go into these companies.
Those who have had only slight train-
ing or none at all will be formed into
a company by themselves.
Fly Union Jack and Stars and Stripes
London, April 18.-For the first time
in history a foreign flag will fly with
the union jack of England over West
minster on Friday. The British com-

missioner of work ordered that the
stars and stripes on that day fly with
the British ensign on all public' build-
ings as an extraordinary tribute to
America.
Son Born to Prof. and Mrs. Gleason
A son was born to. Prof. Henry A.
Gleason and Mrs. Gleason yesterday
morning. The boy weighs seven and
one-half pounds.

15,00 Rifles To
Arrive by Mlay

1

Dean Bates Returns to University Aft-
er :Faking Requisition for
- Equipment
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law
school, adjutant-general of the Univer-
sity, returned from Chicago yesterday
afternoon, after making a requisition
for 1,500 army riflesand other equip-
ment to be sent to the University and
completing the final arrangements for
detailing an army officer to fill the
chair of military science and tactics.
Dean Bates stated last evening that
the equipment will be sent as soon as
the necessary arrangements can be
made at the war office in Washington,
which probably will be in about two
weeks. He also stated that Major
Charles W. Castle, who is to come here
and take charge of the military activ-
ities, will come at once and is presum-
ably on his way.
DENY FIRING OFF OAT
FROM SEAENGAGEMENT
NAVAL OFFICIALS SAY NO BATTLE
TOOK PLACE NEAR CAPE
COD STATIONS
Boston, April 18. - Reports that
heavy firing heard off Princetown ear-
ly today was from a naval engage-
ment off the Massachusetts coast were
denied last night by naval officials.
The conjecture that the firing, which
was heard by three coast guard sta-
tions on Cape Cod, might be the re-
sult of the firing of salutes to some
foreign ship of war, was said to be un-
founded by the officials, who said that
no such salutes were fired. No defin-
ite explanation of the reports has
been made.
"It is improbable that any salute
was fired in that section at the time
the guns are reported to have been
heard by the coast guard on the cape,"
said Captain A. H. Robertson, chief of
staff of Commandant Rush.
No further fact regarding the firing
has been received in the navy yard
since the first telephone report this
morning. What action is being taken
to run down the report of the naval
engagement in the way of nava
movements cannot be stated because
of the strict censorship, of naval news.
That the reports were from a naval
battle is denied, however.
Washington, April 18.-The war de-
partment this afternoon announced
that all reserve officers are to report
at their respective camps between May
1 and May 8 next, training to begin
May 8.
Washington, April 18.- The house
this afternoon passed without a roll call
an administration bill permitting the
allies to recruit their subjects and
citizens in this country for European
service.
West Point, New York, April 18.-
The army's scheduled sporting events
will "stand unless something unfor-
seen develops, it was announced here
today.
ARGENTINE SEIZES ALL
GERMAN SHIPS IN PORT
Buenos Aires, April 18.-Argentine
formally took all German interned
ships "into custody" today. The of-
ficial explaation of the action was to
prevent German crews from damaging
their vessels.
Officially the government has not yet
announced its course as the result of
the torpedoing of the Monte Pro-
tegildo.

Prof. Bartlett Returns from Brooklyn
Prof. H. H. Bartlett of the botanical
department has returned from Brook-
lyn where he lectured Tuesday to the
Brooklyn Academy of Arts and Science
on "Plant Breeding."

MAY GIVE COUR SES
mTOfLITSTUDOENTS
Many from Literary College Turned
Away from Engineering
School
APPEARANCE OF MAJOR C. W.
CASTLE WILL ALTER SITUATION
Drill Should Be Continued; New Bat-
talions Now Being
Formed
By H. C. L. J.
Students of the literary college may
have military courses similar to those
now being gien in the engineering
college.
Enthusiasm marked the opportunity
afforded literary students to enroll in
the elements of military science
course under Prof. John R. Allen. At
least 200 men were turned away. In
view of this attitude it appears that
the courses would be well attended
on the other side of the campus.
Suggest Courses Be Given
Members of the engineering faculty
have suggested that such courses be
given, and it is believed that the lit-
erary faculty is considering the mat-
ter. Whether, in case such courses
were adopted, students would dr6p
several hours work to apply them-
selves to military matters, or whether
attendance would be entirely volun-
tary, has not been announced.
This situation will be affected by the
appearance of Major Charles W. Castle
in the near future. He is expected to
take over military matters generally
and will have the power to recom-
mend the introduction of particular
courses in the University.
In any case the appearance of the
major will spell greater opportunity
for drilling, and each step in advance
beforo he appears will be a true act
of preparedness. Under these condi-
tions it is expected that the companies
which drilled immediately before va-
cation may begin again.
Lit Students Should Drill
"Drill" seems to be the answer to
the question of what the lit students
should do next.
A new battalion was organized Wed-
nesday night at Waterman gymnasium.
It will drill again at 7 o'clock this
evening. The fresh lit battalion will
meet at 4 o'clock this afternoon at
the campus flag staff. There is stilli
a chance for a few men with experi-
ence to enter the ranks of the vaca-
tion battalion, which drills each day.
There will also be a drill each day
from 12:45 to 1:15 o'clock in front of
The Michigan Daily.
GIVE PLAY TONIGHT
"Felicia Finesses" to be Presented by
Junior Women for Last Time
Tonight is the last time the Junior
Girls' play, "Felicia Finesses," will
make its appearance before the wo-
men of the University in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall. At this performance
faculty men as well as women will be
admitted. The proceeds will be given
to the Red Cross.
WILSON VOICES APPROVAL OF
CONFERENCE FOR GOVERNORS
Columbus, April 18.-President Wil-
son may act on the suggestion made

by Governor Cox of Ohio that a con-
ference of governors be called at
Washington, where the president and
his cabinet may map out plans for
uniform co-operation by the states in
war.
"You may be sure this interesting
and fertile idea will remain rooted in
my mind. I am very much obliged to
you, indeed, for your telegram," reads
a letter from the White House to Cox,
made public here today.

Cryptic Handbills
Arouse Interest
Profusion of "Y's" and "7's" in Win-
dows of Stores Bring Forth
Many Inquiries
Two thousand recipients of myster-
ious handbills bearing the figure "7"
and numerous "Y's" in glaring black
ink were left to guess last night
whether they had intercepted the
cryptic correspondence of Teutonic
spies, or were the victims of some
practical joke. Many of the State
street store windows also bore the
same mystic insignia yesterday, but
to all the inquiries of "Why 7?" an
expression of ignorance was voiced by
the shop men. Some few there are
about the campus, however, who prom-
ise an explanation within a few days.
Meanwhile the strange symbols con-
tinue a matter for wonder.
LODGE RAPS ESPIONAGE
BILL. IN SENATE SPEECH
CLAIMS "IT ARMS ADMINISTRA-
TION WITH DANGEROUS
WEAPON"
Washington, April 18.-Declaring it
"arms the administration with dang-
erous power to suppress the freedom
of the press," Senator Lodge in senate
debate today bitterly attacked the
pending espionage bill, particularly the
censorship provision. Lodge defended
free comment and just criticism, and
said only news of value to the enemy
should be suppressed.
The bureau of public information
newly created to disseminate govern-
ment news also came in for opposition
by Lodge, who said it was "dangerous,
to place in the hands of those most
likely to receive the criticism, the
power to suppress it."
Hiram Johnson, concurring, said:
"We should be careful lest in our anx-
iety for democracy abroad we forget
our democracy at home. I think at-
tempts to deny the press legitimate
criticism either of congress or of the
executive is going very dangerously
far. If we are going to pass a bill
like this, I think it would not do to
deny the right of legitimate criticism."
GERMAN ALLIES STILL
COURTING PEACE, REPORT
London, April' 18.-Reports persist
here today that Austria, Bulgaria and
Turkey are all angling for separate
peace agreements with the entente
through secret emissaries. The move
is said to center in Swizerland. No
confirmation is obtainable here.
Amsterdam, April 18.-The Frank-
furter Zeitung, a copy of which has
been received here, says the German
people and the imperial government
desire peace.
"The people and the government,"
the newspaper adds, "also desire re-
formation in internal German condi-
tions, but we will not permit outsiders
to confuse the two questions to make
democratization of our state the price
of our attaining peace. We reject
such interference in our affairs."
Dispatch Says Tisza Has- Resigned
London, April 18.-An Amsterdam
dispatch to the Central News says
the Budapest socialist paper Nowes-
zavk announces the resignation of

Count Tisza, the Hungarian premier.
Issue Warning of Sub's Presence
Washington, April 18.-Warning of
the probable presence of a German
submarine off the Atlantic coast was
sent broadcast to all ships early to-
dady, following receipt at the navy
department of a report from the de-
stroyer Smith, on patrol duty, that a
torpedo had crossed her bows.

COMPLETE REGIMENT OF-]1.200 MEN
TO BE DRILLING ON FERRY FIELD
NEXT WEEK UNDER MAJOR WILS[

HELP MICHIGAN HERE
Michigan men are needed and
are urged to assist in classify-
ing and indexing the answers
from the 45,000 intelligence bur-
eau letters sent out to students,
faculty, and alumni, and now be
ing received daily at the Union.
All men willing to work, es-
pecially those unable to drill,
due to physical defects or any
other causes, are asked to report
at 7:30 o'clock tonight in the
Union dance hall.
In order not to waste money
and effort spent by the Universi-
ty in mailing the letters it is
necessary that the information
be fully recorded. To be valua-
able the cataloguing must be
done at once. Michigan men are
needed.
GREAT U. S. WAR
CREDIT IS PASSED
Measure Awaits Only House 0. K. to
Amendments and Wilson's
Signature
Washington, April 18.-The largest
single war credit in history will be
at the disposal of the administration
as soon as the house approves senate
amendments to the $7,000,000,000 war
revenue bill. This may be today. The
measure passed the senate Tuesday
night by unanimous vote.
The house was expected to accept
the few senate changes without send-
ing the measure to conference. The
senate, however, named conferees to
act should the house not approve tile
changes.
The bill will be submitted to Presi-
dent Wilson for his signature as soon
as the house approves the measure.
Treasury officials began today to
work out the policy to be employed
in issuing the bonds. Secretary Mc-
Adoo has invited suggestions ,from
members of the advisory council of
the federal reserve board.
The measure, which provides for a
loan to the allies of $3,000,000,000, was
approved affer seven hours' discus-
sion in the senate.
LAYING OF UNION CORNER-
STONE TO BE INFORMAL
No formal ceremony will be held at
the laying of the cornerstone of the
new Michigan Union which will be
laid sometime between May 10 and
Commencement day.
At the meeting of the Union board
yesterday, in view\of the present sit-
uation, it was decided to do away with
all unnecessary social events.
The Union membership dinner,
which was to be held next Thursday,
was postponed indefinitely. Co-opera-
ing with the Red Cross society, com-
mittees will be appointed by the Union
to assist in the ticket sale for the
Red Cross ball to be held April 27
in Barbour and Water gymnasiums.
Lightning Strikes Interurban Car
Interurban traffic between Jackson
and Detroit was held up for over an
hour last night when the eastbound
car, leaving Detroit at 6 o'clock, was
struck by lightning and delayed for
more than an hour. Fire broke out in
three places on the roof of the car, but
was quickly extinguished by the crew
of the car assisted by the passengers.

ALL ENGINEERING CLASSES TO
TRAIN TUESDAYS AND
THURSDAYS
TAKE OFFICERS FROM
VACATION ARMY RANKS
Eight Courses in Military Engineering
Now Being Given in Uni-
versity
A complete regiment of 1,200 men,
consisting of freshman, sophomore,
junior, and senior students of the Col-
lege of Engineering under the com-
mand of Major C. E. Wilson, will be
drilling on Ferry field next week be-
tween the hours of 4 and 6 o'clock
on Tuesday and Friday afternoons.
Officers for the regiment will be
taken from engineers in the ranks of
the vacation battalion that was called
back yesterday into the departmental
corps by the action of the military
committee of the engineering college.
A full fife and drum corps with an
enrollment of 22 men will be a part
of the complement of the regiment.
The regiment will be made up of
three companies of seniors, two com-
panies of juniors, and three companies
each of sophomores and freshmen. The
junior and senior companies are al-
ready organized. The sophomores and
freshmen will organize immediately.
Organize Following Resolution
Organization of the regiment fol-
lows the passing of a resolution by
members of the military committee of
the College of Engineering, consisting
of Prof. John R. Allen, chairman;
Prof. A. E. White, Prof. J. C. Parker,
Prof. C. T. Johnston, Prof. W. T.
Fishleigh, Prof. L. M. Gram, and Major
C. E. Wilson, which provides that any
student in the college may substitute
drill under proper military authorities
on Tuesday and Friday afternoons be-
tween the hours of 4 and 6 o'clock for
any conflicting University exercise.
Such drill under the provisions of
the resolution shall be entirely at the
option of the student, but a student
electing the drill must subject himself
to military discipline. These two drill
periods shall constitute the official
drill for students in the course in ele-
ments of military engineering.
The military committee took further
action yesterday afternoon that will
result in the holding of a series of lec-
tures on aviation, machine gun, and
artillery operation, and camp sanita-
tion. The lectures probably will be
held in Hill auditorium within the
next few weeks. The lecture on camp
sanitation will be given by an army
officer that visited the Canadian mili-
tary camps and took several reels of
motion pictures. The lectures will be
a part of the course given in ele-
mentary military engineering, but will
be open to the public.
Give Eight Courses
Starting this week on their plan to
put the engineering college on a mili-
tary basis, members of the faculty are
now conducting eight courses in mili-
tary engineering. There are at pres-
ent 225 students enrolled in the course
given in elements of military engineer-
ing. The majority of students in the
course are senior engineers, with a
sprinkling of senior literary students.
Two special courses for men pre-
pared are being offered. One of the
courses consists in the study of muni-
tion making. The other is a course
in metallurgy, which takes up wor
of inspecting all sorts of steel. These
courses are only open to students in
the chemical department or men hav-
ing special work along chemical lines
Prof. Fishleigh Giving Course
Prof. W. T. Fishleigh of the me-
chanical engineering department is
, (Continued on Page Six)

A _

THE SPIDER SOON WILL SPIN

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