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April 18, 1917 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-18

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1 JTiL. iV11L.U.ri 3tAP4 -L LI,'

iESPLAN TO
NCRH ASE CROPS

T

Members of Civic Clubs Start Cam-
paign to Make Every Vacant
Lot Produce
PETITION TO ALLOW SCHOOL
STUDENTS TO LEAVE WORK
Ward Committees Will Have Charge
of Property Listing and Names
of Prospective Farmers
Another step in the nation-wide
movement to increase the food supply
of the country has been made by the
city of Ann Arbor. A campaign has
been started by representatives of the
Ann Arbor Civic association, Women's
club, Collegiate alumnae, and other or-
ganizations of the city to have every
vacant lot in the city and suburbs
firmed this year.
At the head of this work will be the
\ publicity committee, composed of Dr.
H. S. Gleason, Mr. W. E. Underdown,
and Ray Bassett which in the next
three lays will endeavor to make a
complete list of all the vacant prop-
erty in the city, and also a list of all
those people who would care to make
use of anyof these lots.
The publicity committee will be
aided in their work' by ward commit-
tees which will have charge of the
property listing in their own vicinities.
All residents of the different wards
are urged to report to these commit-
tees not only any' vacant lots which
they may have, but also the names of
any who would care to cultivate this
ground. This information will be
handed to the general committee at
the meeting to be held on Friday night
and will be on file at the city hall.
A petition to allow all the under-
graduates of the high school to leave
school the first of May and to give
the seniors of the school their di-
pggs af that time providing that the
students work on farms will be sent
to the city board of education by the
representatives.
The members of the ward commit-
tees are as follows: First ward, Mr.
C. W. Alexander and Mrs. M. J. Taft;
Second ward, Mr. A. S. Lutz and Mr.
R. C. Killins; Third ward, Mr. S.
Birchfield and Mr. G. J. Bischoff;
Fourth ward, Mr. E. Warner and Mr
G. Burke; Fifth ward, Mr. and Mrs.
F. P. Ward and Mr. E. B. Manwaring;
sixth ward, Mr. L. Waterman, Mr. C.
C. Freeman, and Mrs. E. H. Krauss;
Seventh ward, Mr. L. D. Carr, Mr. C.
L. Brookes, and Mrs. J. R. Miner.
MAJOR RUKKE TO LECTURE TO
MEDICAL STUDENTS THIS WEEK
Major Guy B. Rukke, who is sta-
tioned at Fort Snelling, Minnesota,
will be in Ann Arbor Wednesday,
Thursday, and Friday of this week to
deliver the first of his course of lec-
tures before the Medical school. The
subject of his lectures will be "Mili-
tary Medicine and Camp Sanitation."
Major Rukke is a graduate of the
University of Michigan Medical school,
having graduated in 1904. The major
will spend half of his time in Ann
Arbor and the other half at the Uni-
verslty of Minnesota, where he will
deliver the same course of lectures.
CUBA RAPIDLY GETTING ON
WAR FOOTING; WOMEN HELP
Washington, April 17.-Cuba, the
youngest republic in the western
world, is rapidly getting on a war foot-
ing. Following the example set by
the United States, the women of Cuba
are rallying to the support of the
American Red Cross and the spirit of
economy in living. The agriculture,
labor, and commerce departments are
taking steps to cope with the food

shortage problem. A sweeping patrol
of the Cuban coast has been e'stab-
lished by the Cuban navy.
W. W. ELLSWOR'H TO SPEAK ON
EXPERIENCE OF PUBISHER
W. W. Ellsworth, ex-president of the
Century Publishing company, will lec-
ture at 4 o'clock next Friday after-
noon on some phases of his wide ex-
perience as publisher. The place where
the meeting will be held has not
been determined as yet, but will be
announced at an early date. Although
the talk is to be given under the
auspices of the journalism department,
all students interested in the subject
are invited to attend.
Dr. Northey to Talk to Prescott Club
Dr. F. 0. Northey of the Parke,
Davis Co. of Detroit will speak before
the Prescott club on "Antiseptic Con-
ditions" at 3:30 o'clock today in room
165 Chemistry building. The lecture
will be illustrated by stereoptican

:..ae.., ..o . .

SCENE FROM "PEG.O' MY HEART''

TO BE PLAYED AT WHITNEY

THEATER SATURDAY, APRIL 21.

Cabinet Considers
Safety Legislation
To Insure Government Power of Ac-
tion If Co-operation
Fails
Washington, April 17.-Legislation
to insure the government power of ac-
tion in event of failure by the rail-
roads, manufacturers,middle men, or
merchants to co-operate was ,discussed
at today's brief cabinet session.
The same subject has been made the
basis of ,a long conference by the
counsel of national defense just be-
fore the cabinet meeting, and it was
stated that the legislation in question
would be ready shortly for submis-
sion to congress.
Official reports to the navy depart-
ment on the attack by a submarine
on the American torpedo destroyer
Smith were read, the reports stating
that the submarine was. apparently
German.,
It was stated by cabinet members
after the conference that the president
and Secretary of War Baker are de-
termined to stand pat on the con-
scription army bill. They will not
modify it and expect it to pass.
NATIONAL DEFENSE COUNSEL
DISCUSSES FOOD SITUATION
Washington, April 17.-After a
meeting of the counsel of national de-
fense at which the question of food
regulation and distribution was the
parmount" subject under discussion,
Secretary Houston said he was rapidly
compiling dain upon which he would
request iegislation from the congress
authorizing the government to fix
minimum and maximum prices on food
stuffs. He said the government would
take no action in the case unless the
middle men made it necessary.
LEAGUE COMMITTEE MEETS
TO CONSIDER FOOD SUPPLY
A meeting of the executive commit-
tee of the National Security league
was held at 5 o'clock yesterday after-
noon in the geology lecture room, to
discuss plans whereby the faculty and
student body could help in the culti-
vation of food crops. The question of
food supplies is steadily assuming
more importance and it is hoped that
the University can be of some assist-
ance in meeting it.
f. E. COOPER, GRAD., ELECTED
INSTRUCTOR AT WASHINGTON
Clyde E. Cooper, graduate assistant
in geography, has been elected in-
siuctor in geography in the Washing-
ton State Normal college located at
Cheney. Mr. Cooper will leave to
take up his duties June 1.
Vlectrical Engineering Professor Weds
Porter H. Evans, '14E, instructor in
the electrical engineering department,
and Miss Laura Spencer of Erie, Pa.,
were married at Erie Monday, April
10. Mr. and Mrs. Evans will make
their home at 510 Lawrence street in
this city. Mr. Evans recently made ap-
plication for examination for a com-
mission in the engineering officers' re-
serve corps.
"Y" Agency Gives Out 300 Odd Jobs
Over three hundred jobs were given
out by the "Y" employment agency
during vacation. The jobs ranged in
character from waxing floors to tak-
ing care of backward children.

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* * * * * * * * * * *
AT THE THEATERS
TODAY
Majestic-Giw, Cohan in
"Broadway also an
"Educational
Arcade-Anita Stewart : le
Girl Philippa.'
Orpheum - Douglas Fairbanks
in "The Lamb" and Keystone
comedy.
Rae-Bertha Kalich in "Love
and Hate." Charlie Chaplin
in "The Rink."

*
* :
*

*

AT THE WHITNEY

After a half a year at the Belasco
and George M. Cohan theaters, New
York, "Seven Chances" will come to
the Whitney theater Thursday, April
19.
The story treats of the predicament
of a confirmed woman hater, a young
bachelor, who is obliged to marry in
24 hours to inherit the large fortune
of his grandfather. For this reason
he proposes to seven different girls,
hence the name of the show.'
Frank Craven plays the role of the
bachelor, while Carroll McComas is
well cast as the girl he eventually
marries.

ALSO AT WHITNEY

"Peg O' My Heart," Oliver Moros-
co's success which recently concluded
a two years' run at the Cort theater,
New York, will be seen at the Whitney
theater April 21, afternoon and even-
ing.
' This play was written by J. Hartley
Manners for his wife, Laurette Taylor,
who was the original star of the pro-
duction.
In the production to be seen at the
Whitney, Marion Dentler will appear
as Peg and will be supported by an
English cast.
The story of "Peg O' My Heart" has
to do with the experiences of an im-
pulsive Irish girl who goes to live
with an exceedingly snobbish haughty
British family.

Under the Sea" will be the next at-
traction at the Majestic, three days be-
ginning Thursday.
This wonderful photo drama with
its marvelous scenes under the ocean
and telling the story of the imagina-
tive Captain Neme with hissubmarine
Nautilus is the greatest achievement
in motion pictures as the mysteries of
the deep are unfolded by means of the
camera.
PLAN RED CROSS BALL
Dance Friday in Benefit of Ann Arbor
Chapter
At a meeting Monday evening at-
tended by 30 prominent citizens and
members of the University, details
were arranged for a ball to be given
for the benefit of the Ann Arbor
chapter of the Red Cross society from
9 to 1 o'clock, Friday, April 27, in
Waterman and Barbour gymnasiums.
Membership in the Red Cross is not
necessary for admission, everyone is
invited.
The gymnasium is to be handsomely
deWgated and the affair will be in-
teresting to spectators who do not
dance. Company I of the national
guard is invited, and it is hoped that
the naval reserves will be able to at-
tend. Two orchestras will play and
refreshments will be sold.
One thousand tickets at 50 cents
each are now on sale. Miss Edith
Russell and Miss Dorothy MVillen will
distribute them among the sororities.
They will be sent to all the frater-
nities also.
Hospital Notes
No new cases of german measles
have been reported in the last few
days. The epidemic that seemed so
prevalent before vacation is now un-
der control and no outbreak is ex-
pected from that source
The following men have been admit-
ted to the surgical ward: D. W. Ed-
wards. '18; Carrol Davenport, '20; W.
D. Stinson, '20M; Clarence L. Rasmus-
sen, '19, and Ralph M. Vincent, '17M.
THIRD PERFORMANCE OF GIRLS'
PLAY TO BE GIVEN THURSDAY
"Felicia Finesses," the annual Jun-
ior Girls' play, will make its third ap-
pearance at 8 o'clock tomorrow night
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
This performance will differ in two
respects from the previous ones. Fac-
ulty men will be admitted and the pro-
ceeds of the play will be turned over
to the Red Cross.
Catholic Club to Give Fourth Party
The fourth of a series of dancing
parties held this year by the Catholic
Students' club will be given from 2:30
to 5:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon in
the Packard academy.
Graduate Club to Give First Dance
The first dance of the year of the
Graduate club will be held Saturday
evening from 8 to 12 o'clock in Bar-
bour gymnasium.
Students Act to Benefit Belgians
Champaign, Ill., April 17. - The
"Players' club" of the University of
Illinois, is to present a play for the
benefit of the Belgian relief work. All
profits are to be turned over to those
in charge of the relief of Belgian suf-
fering.
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad. i

MERICAN HERO RETURNS
FROMCANADIANTRENCHES
CALT'AT i MCBRIDE OF INIIANA,
WINS ThREE )DC(RhATONS
FOR GALLANTRY
New York, April 17.-Catain Herb-
ert McBride of Annapolis, Indiana,
three tinie:; decorated fur gallantry ini
action with the Canadian forces on
the western front, arrived at an Am-
erican port today on another armed
American liner He is here on a fur-
lough, his first visit home since early
in 115 when he left on active ser-
vice as a member of the 21st Canadian
infantry. At that time he was an en-
listed soldier.
Since then he has won a captaincy
and three decorations for gallantry.
His most notable achievement was
when every one else in his machine
gun squad was killed by the Germans,
and Captain McBride managed to
keep his machine gun going, holding
the position until relief came. Captain
McBride, it is understood, arranged
with the British government for an
honorable discharge, and the raising
of a company of his Indiana friends
whom he will drill in trench fighting.
McBride was made a sergeant when
he led a dozen men on a raid in which
every man in a German outpost posi-
tion was killed and a machine gun
captured. His later feats as com-
mander of machine gun squads lead
to his appointment as a captain with-
out ever having been a lieutenant.
CityNews
Following an illness of several
months, Jonathan Stanger, a resident
of Ann Arbor for the past 38 years,
died at his home, 417 South Fourth
avenue, yesterday. He was 49 years
old and came to Ann Arbor in 1879
from Brazil where he was born. Fun-
eral services will be held at 2 o'clock
tomorrow afternoon at the late resi-
dence
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs.
Ernest Lohr died Monday night of
scarlet fever. Burial was held at 3
o'clock yesterday afternoon.
Miss Nora Boyle died Monday after-
noon at her residence, 513 North Di-
vision street, following a short illness.
Funeral services will be held at 9
o'clock tomorrow morning at St.
Thomas church. Burial will be made
in St. Patrick cemetery at Northfield.
EdwardNowak, 826 Spring street, a
life resident of this city, died yester-
day morning at his home after an ill-
ness of two years. The Rev. Mr. Brau-
er will officiate at the funeral services
which will be held at 3:30 o'clock to-
morrow afternoon at the late resi-
dence.
Richard Caplin, Ypsilanti, was fined
$3.45 for driving with no tail lamp
lighted. He was arraigned last night.
Dorrance Goddard paid a fine of $18.45
for driving 50 miles an hour on Church
street. R. Puffer of Detroit, paid
$13.45 for driving too fast. Three tax-
icab drivers are arraigned for parking
their cars across sidewalks.
PARLIAMENT WORK BLOCKED
THROUGH IRISH NATIONALISTS
Organized Group Against All Meas-
ures Except Those Relating
to Present War

London, April 17.-Faced with or-
ganized efforts by Irish nationalists
to force, a general election by defeat-
ing the bill for prolongation of parila-
ment, Chancellor of the Exchequer
Bonar Law announced in the house of
commons this afternoon that Premier
Lloyd-George would make a statement
next week outlining the government's
attitude on Irish home rule.
By law parliament must pass a
measure prolonging its own life prior
to April 30.r
All nationalists have adopted an at-
titude of obstruction to all govern-
ment measures except those relating
to the war since failure of their re-
cent renewed attempt to force settle-
ment of the Irish home rule question.
Since that time it has been known
that Lloyd-George and other govern-
ment heads have been constantly seek-
ing some solution.
UTAH STUDENTS GIVE UP $240
FEED FOR BENEFIT RED CROSS
Salt Lake City, April 17.-Utah stu-
dents are sacrificing a $200 feed for
the benefit of the Red Cross. The an-
nual "U" day banquet,- a feature of
Utah life, has been given up as a
means of aiding the country. The $200
appropriated for the banquet will be
used to aid the Red Cross in its ap-
peals for funds.

NEW MILITARY TRAINING
COURSE STARTS TODAY
SPECIAL STUDIE B 1V 1 BEEN
ADDED TO EACH ENGL-
NEERING SCHOOL
A course in elementary iniiitary
training will start in the engineering
college this morning. Nearly all of the
seniors and a large number of juniors
have enrolled for the courses.
Special courses have been added to
the curriculum of each department,
and seniors and juniors permitted to
drop the branches they have been pur-
suing thus far this semester and take
military engineering.
Prof. A. H. White of the chemical
engineering department, -announced
yesterday that no munitions would be
manufactured in the Chemical-build-
ing, and that there would be no labor-
atory work in munitions making. This
was advised by Major O'Hearn of the
bureau of mines munitions laboratory
at Pittsburg.
Prof. A. H. White, Instructor Clair
Upthegrove, R. S. Archer, grad., and
H. J. Smith, grad., visited munitions
plants in Detroit, Toledo, and Windsor,
last week in order to familiarize them-
selves with the practical side of the
work.
In the electrical engineering de-
partment all the seniors but three are
taking military work. Three hours
credit is given for the course, which
requires five hours laboratory and
four hours field work a week. The
field work includes telegraph, tele-
phone, and wireless telegraph operat-
ing.
About 70 senior civil engineers have
enrolled for the special courses in
their department.
Tennis Schedule
Is Called Off
Along with other sports which have
been called off because of the war, ten-
nis has been cancelled.
Captain Codd had arranged matches
with many of the big eastern colleges.
After the action taken by the board in
control of Athletics, all games were
cancelled by mutual consent.
No definite plans have been made
for the team in the future as many
of the men on the squad expect to en-
list or have already left for service.
BASEBALL LEADERS DO NOT
WANT SOHEDULES CANCELLED
Johnstown, Pa., April 17.-Amateurs
and semi-professional baseball lead-
ers in all parts of the country have
entered strong objections to the exe-
cutive committee of the national base-
ball federation at Detroit on April 21
taking any action toward calling off
its annual inter-city championship on
account of the war.
They claim that government and
military authorities recommend the
continuance of the game, that the
sport will be a welcome diversion to
the general public, and that the con-
tests will tend to improve the physical
condition of the men and boys left be-
hind on the first call.
Baseball Managers to Discuss Plans
Intramural Athletic Director Rowe
will meet all class baseball managers
at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon in the
athletic officers for the purpose of dis-
cussing plans for interclass games.
All managers are urged to be present.

PRE-MEDICS FORM COMPANY
Hold Regular Drills; Students to Act
as Officers for the Present
Pre-medic students in the literary
college have formed an organization
for voluntary military drilling to be
officered temporarily by students. A
number of men have already signed
up for regular training with this com-
pany and will be notified of the hours
when they will be expected to drill.
There will be two division, one meet-
ing on Monday and Thursday at 4 and
5 o'clock and the other on Tuesday
and Friday at the same hours. Any
pre-Amedic students who have not yet
joined the organization and wish to
do so can report to the commanding
officer at 4 or 5 o'clock.
The officers of the First division
will be Captain J. N. Nichols and Lieu-
tenants Gillette and Esteves. The
Second division will be officered for
the present by Captain J. R. Long and
Lieutenants Douglas and Aten. The
men will assemble in front of the
Medical building.
Naval Reserves to Dance at Packard
Members of the Seventh division
Michigan naval reserves will hold a
dance at the Packard academy next
Friday evening.
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

AT TH GARRICK

"His Little Widows" described as a
1917 model of a musical comedy, is at
the Garrick theater, Detroit, this
week. It was written by Rida John-
son Young, author of "Naughty Mari-
etta," "Brown of Harvard," 'Captain
Kidd, Jr.," Her Soldier Boy," and
other recent successes. The lyrics are
by William Cary Duncan, and the
music by William Schroeder.

AT THE MAJESTIC

Marguerite Snow, the well known
screen favorite, is George M. Cohan's
leading lady in his first photoplay,
"Broadway Jones," in which she por-I
trays the - role of Josie Richards, the
pretty stenographer at the Jones' gum
factory, who shows the wild youth thej
right path. Following a notable stage
career, she achieved wide prominence'
in motion pictures, her characteriza-
tion of the Countess Zudora in "The
Million Dollar Mystery" being well re-
membered. Miss Snow makes an ideal
"Josie" in "Broadway Jones," which
is now playing at the Majestic.
The photoplay version of Jules
Verne's "Twenty Thousand Leagues

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