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April 17, 1917 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-17

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HE WEATHER
WARN WINDS
TODAY

1, 00 APO
AW Awi4t

~~Ait

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

f---

VOL. XXVII. No. 135.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TIUE SDAY, APRIL 17, 1917.

PRICE FIVE G

COMMITTE TES
AGAINST ELECTIVE
DRAFT PRINCIPLE
HOUSE MILITARY GROUP IN TEST
VOTE DEFEAT MEASURE
BY 9-8 COUNT
SENTIMENT FAVORS
VOLUNTEER SYSTEM
Introduce Two Amendments to Gen-
eral Staff Bill; Borland De-
fends Draft Policy
Washington, April 16.-On a test
vote the principle of the elective draft
incorporated in the general staff army
bill was defeated in the house mili-
tary committee this afternoon by a
nine to eight vote.
One member present, Field of Ken-
tacky, did not vote. The vote indicated
that unless sentiment in the commit-
tee changes the committee will recom-
mend the volunteer system be given
a try-out before conscription is re-
sorted to to raise an army of 500,000
for service in Europe.
Submit Two Amendments
Two important amendments to the
general staff bill were introduced in
the committee today. They will be
acted on tomorrow. One amendment
by Chairman Dent would give the vol-
unteer system a trial, but would give
President Wilson authority at the
same time to declare the volunteer
system a failure and demand con-
scription. Another amendment by
Representative Anthony of Kansas
provides for raising the army by a
volunteer system. However, a mili-
tary census of all eligible males would
be started at once. If within five
months the number of troops required
have not volunteered conscription
should begin immediately.
Borland Defends Draft System
The elective draft was described to-'
day by Borland as the fairest, \safest,
and most democratic national defense
system. Borland's speech was the first
formal address in the house on con-
scription. "The very suggestion of
universal liability to military service
as applied to our country seems to
have caused a shock to the minds of
many gentlemen in this house. It is
infinitely superior to a mercenary
force or a system of voluntary enlist-
ment. It contains an element of Jus-
tice and equality which should appeal
to all Americans. Say what you will,
in the last analysis it is the sole re-
source for national defense. It will
not be amiss, therefore, even this
early in the contest, to consider it
seriously, and to contrast it with other
possible methods of creating a mili-
tary force."
PREDICTS WAR'S END
Prof. E. Kraus Says Germany Lacks
Necessary Supplies
The war must end within the next
few months because of the lack of
minerals necessary in the manufact-
ure of munitions, and of petroleum,
rubber, wool, cotton, and foodstuffs,
according to the statement of Prof. Ed-
ward Kraus of the mineralogy depart-
ment.
Professor Kraus says that Germany

will have a repetition of her crop
failures of last year owing to the
fact that no fertilizer is available.
Prior to the war, the United States
furnished phospate rock in large
quantites for Germany, but this sup-
ply has been entirely cut off.
Because of this shortage Professor
Kraus says, the central powers are
doomed to crumble within the next
few' months.
VERNE BURNETT,'17, AND LAURA
NURDOCK, '18, RECENTLY MARRY
Verne E. Burnett, '17, and Laura M.
Murdock, '18, were married in this
city recently, shortly before the spring
vacation. Burnett, who has been
working on the Detroit Free Press
since his graduation, is at present en-
gaged in work for the war department
in Detroit. He retains his connection
with the Free Press.
Burnett was editor of last summer's
Wolverine, and associate editor of the
Michigan Daily for one semester.

URGE MEDICS FINISH
President Hutchins has re-
ceived from the Council of Na-
tional Defense a letter in which
it is suggested that to avoid
any shortage in the nation's
supply of prospective medical
officers, it is the patriotic duty
of young men, who are looking
forward to medicine as a career,
to continue their studies and en-
roll in the medical school of
their choice. It is further sug-
gested that "no medical student
who has not completed three
years of medical work should be
permitted to give up his course
as his country needs his train-
ed andcnothis untrained ser-
vice."
LENS AND STI.QUENTIN
N EARLY TAKEN - LONDON

NO OFFICIAL

REPORT AS YET;

TROOPS IN OUTSKIRTS
OF CITIES
Bulletin
London, April 16.-Latest re-
ports from thedBritish and French
armies engaged in General Haig's
great drive upon Lens and SL
Quentin announce the capture of
a great number of German troops
outside the cities. The fighting is
,being hotly contested on both
sides near Lens, but the thunder-
ous assault of General Haig's army
is slowly pressing back the stub-
born resistance of the enemy.
London, April 16.-Unofficial reports
here today indicated that the great
British drive against the Hindenburg
wall is still steadily advancing. Re-
ports assert that troops are located in
the outskirts of both Lens and St.
Quentin. No official news of the cap-
ture of the two towns has been re-
ceived.
The "Haig plan" of bombardment of
the famous Hindenburg line is being
put into practice all along the Ger-
man line from Loos to the north of
St. Quentin. The artillery has suf-
fered the heavy burden of fighting
around Lens owing to the natural de-
fenses of waste dumps around the
mines in that vicinity.
News of the fall of both St. Quentin
and Lens was rumored throughout the
day, but nothing definite could be ob-
tained from military officials. The
fall of the two cities is expected any
moment if Haig's method of attack
continues its successes.
GLENN M. COULTER CONFINED IN
HOSPITAL WITH SCARLET FEVER
Glenn M. Coulter, '18L, president of
the Michigan Unio, was taken sick-
with scarlet fever Saturday and con-
fined to his rooms at 422 East Kings-
ley street. Later he was removed to
the University hospital.
Homer Heath, '07, secretary of the
Union, will assist with some of the
president's work for the present.
SECRETARY OF THE NAVY
ORDERED WIRELESS REMOVED
The University wireless station has
been dismantled by direction of the
secretary of the navy under the gen-
eral order to dismantle all wireless
stations not operated by the govern-
ment. The action was taken under
the executive order recently issued by
the president directing the navy de-
partment to take over all radio sta-
tions.
FOOD CURTAILMENT STARTS
GENERAL STRIKE IN BERLIN
Amsterdam, April 16.-A general
strike began in Berlin featured by
rioting, according to information re-
ceived here. Curtailment of the bread
ration was scheduled to go into ef-
fect yesterday throughout Germany,
and reports of the past few days have
indicated great dissatisfaction with a
hint of possible disorder if the curtail-
ment was persisted in.

3(10 MEN VEU
RECSSFOR DRILL
Five C(ompainies of Students Train
Under Captain Fowler
of Army
USE FERRY FIELD FOR WORK;
F UvTY 3iE-3MERS TAKE PART
Maneuvers Include Close and Extended
Crill rind 3Manual
of Arms
More than 350 men sacrificed the
pleasures of spring vacation to take
the intensive military drill which has
been given during the past week un-
der the command of Captain R. F.
Fowler of the United States corps of
engineers. Several members of the
faculty participated in the drills.
It was at first intended to limit the
number to 80 men, but this was ex-
tended to 125. As more than 350 men
reported ',r the first drill, however,
the limit -vas taken off and all of the
men reporting were allowed to drill.
Ferry Field Drill Ground
Ferry field was made the scene of
the war maneuvers. From 1:15 to
5:15 o'clock daily the men trained in
close and extended order formations.
This work included some skirmish
drill and work in staking out simple
trenches.
Owing to the fact that there were
only enough rifles for one company,
drill in the manual of arms was neces-
sarilyv limited. Each company, how-
ever, received 40 minutes of drill with
the rifles every afternoon.
Divide Into Companies
Th e battalion was divided into five
com:-anies of approximately 65 men
each. The men were given the "school
of te soldier," "the school of the
squa ," "the school of the company,"
and "the school of the battalion."
"The object of the drill," said Cap-
tain Fowler, "is to give the men the
fundanentals of military science, and
to get them started on a plan of disci-
pline ",hich would be considered prop-
er in the regular service."
Prof. J. Bursley in Charge
Prof. Joseph Bursley of the engi-
neering college, who was in charge of
the drill during vacation, reports that
the results of the week's work have
been encouraging, not only in the num-
ber of men reporting, but also in the
progress which the men have made
in learning the maneuvers.
The drill ended yesterday afternoon
with maneuvers by the entire battalion
under command of Captain Fowler.
MICHIGAN WOMEN
AID UNION WORK
b t®,. Qif Tioa in Getting Out

DETAIL ARMY OFFICER
War Department,
Washington, April 11, 1917.
By direction of the President,
Maj. Charles W. Castle, detach-
ed officers' list, is relieved from
further duty at the University
of Missouri, Columbia, Mo., and
is detailed under the provisions
of the act of congress, approved
June 3, 1916, as professor of
military science and tactics at
the University of Michigan, Ann
Arbor, Mich. Major Castle will
proceed to Ann Arbor and report
in person to the president, Uni-
versity of Michigan, for duty.
The travel directed is necessary
in the military service.
By order of the Secretary of
War:
H. L. SCOTT,
Major General, Chief of Staff.
ORDER N LRESERVES
READYFOR TRIING
COIPS SPENDS RECESS DRILLING
IN BARRACKS AT WATERMAN
GYMNASIUM
Severe? and eight divisions, of the
Michigan Naval reserves composed for
the most - part of University students,
have been barracked since the first
Tuesday of the spring recess in Water-
man gymnasium, awaiting government
orders to report to training ships at
one of the Great Lakes' training
schools, probably at Chicago.
Orders to mobilize came to Ann
Arbor the Friday night school was
dismissed after most/ of the men en-
rolled in the two units had left Ann
Arbor for their homes. By the fol-
lowing Tuesday practically all of the
reserves had reported at their com-
mands. As yet it is purely a matter of
speculation as to the exact time when
the reserves will be sent to the train-
ing stations, government orders being
to the effect that the divisions should
go as soon as there is room to accom-
modate them on the training ships.
Enroll 150 Men
The two divisions have at present
a total enrollment of 150 men with a
long string of names on the waiting
list. During the week the two units
under the command of Lieutenants
McNiel and Hayden, have been spend-
ing six hours daily in practicing all
manners of drills, in learning the man-
ual of arms and attending lectures on
first aid, marlin spike seamanship,
sanitation, and the care of fractures.
The "black faced gang," engineers
of the division, spent several after-
noons hardening themselves for their
future work by working out in front
of some of the largest boilers in the
city.
Stand Guard
The deck and line men of the divis-
ion have ben spending their spare
moments in practicing knot tieing,
sweeping off the gym steps and stand-
ing guard around the barracks.
Yesterday afternoon Captain Lewis
and Assistant Paymaster Moore of De-
troit, reviewed the two units on Fer-
ry field. After the review, Captain
Lewis stated that the divisions were in
fine condition, having developed in an
unusually short time.
BATTALION 'REPORT

Meeting to Decide Important Issue
Regarding Training
All men who at any time during
the past week of vacation have been
drilling in the voluntary University
battalion will report in the usual
places, and their respective companies
at 5 o'clock today.
The meeting will be held to deter-
mine an important issue which has
arisen concerning the announcement
that a major of the United States army
has been assigned to train the men at
the University.
What the action taken at the meet-
ing will result in is not definitely set-
tled but prospects are that a perma-
nent battalion of students may be
formed to drill and train pending the
arrival of the detailed officer.

Balfour 's Arrival
Veiled in Secrecy
Various Departments of Government
Conceal News of Committee's
Coming
Washington, April 16. - Admiral
Fletcher and several other officials
have left to meet British Foreign Min-
ister Balfour, Secretary of the Navy
Daniels announced this afternoon.
Late thisafternoon the White House
and the state. war, and navy depart-
ment clamped down the secrecy lid as
to the time and place of arrival of
Foreign Minister Balfour.
It was intimated there had been a
change of program since earlier in-
formation to the effect that Balfour
would reach New York at 5:30 o'clock
this afternoon. Pressed for details one
official said this afternoon that "the
committee would arrive somewhere
within at least 36 hours of Washing-
ton this evening."
Welcome Committee in Boston
Boston, April 16.-It was reported
that the committee of welcome ap-
pointed to receive the Franco-British
commission in the United States was
in Boston. Their arrival was kept
very quiet and absolutely no informa-
tion- concerning their movements was
given out.
The committee consists of Third
Assistant SecretarycLong, represent-
ing the State department; Read Ad-
miral Fletcher and Commander Sel-
lers, representing the nvy, and
Colonel Robert Michie, Lieutenant-
Colonel Cosby, and Captain Queke-
meyer, representing the army.
FIRE CAUSES $2,000 e
LOSS TO SORORITY
Alpha Epsilon Iota Is Forced to Move
Following Destructive
Blaze
After a loss of perhaps $2,000 by fire,
the home of Alpha Epsilon Iota was
rendered untenable yesterday noon. It
is thought to have been caused by a
defective flue. The third floor and
roof were completely demolished by
fire, while the other two floors were
ruined considerably by water and
smoke. Most of the members' trunks
which were stored in the garret were
badly destroyed by fire, along with a
considerable amount of clothing. On
account of the damage done the so-
ciety is forced to move and in the
future will be located at 1027 East
Huron street.
SUBMIT ESTIMATE FOR LAND
FOR FLEET OPERATING BASE
Washington, April 16.-An estimate
of $3,000,000 for an appropriation to
acquire land equipment for a fleet op-
erating base off Hampton Roads, Vir-
ginia, to be immediately available, was
submitted to congress today by Sec-
retary Daniels through Secretary of
the Treasury McAdoo.
The site recommended is the old
Jamestown exposition ground and ad-
joining tracts which can be purchased
for $1,400,000. It is estimated that
$1;600,000 will be required for de-
velopment. The base will include a
training station for 8,000 men, a sub-
marine base for 20 submarines, an
aviation base, accommodations for oil
fuel storage, mine and torpedo stor-
age, medical storage, fleet storage, and
coal piers, and large drill grounds
ashore.

BRAZILIANS CHEER PRO-WAR
SPEECH BY POPULAR SENATOR
Rio de Janiero, April 16.-Fifty
thousand Brazilians today cheered en-
thusiastically an inflammatory pro-
war speech by Brazil's idol of the
people, Senator Rui Barbosa, declar-
ing that war with Germany was in-
evitable, and that "the situation in
Brazil and in the United States is
identical."
Barbosa declared President Wilson's
war message to congress was a tri-
umph of the people over government
intrigue and German diblomacy. Meet-
ings in towns and villages all over
Brazil are an indication of the war de-
mand to which the government will be
forced to yield. It was announced to-
day that a number of prominent
Brazilians had agreed to meet with
representative Argentine leaders at
Buenos Aires to discuss the German-
South American situation.-

FUTURE TRAININ
DISCUSSED ATDBIG
MILITARYSMOKER
ANNOUNCEMENT DETAILING ARMY
OFFICER MEETS HEARTY
APPROVAL
EMPHASIZE NEED OF
TRAINING IN TRENCHES
Sergeant Ball, Fresh from Europe,
Describes Army Life at
Front
What Michigan will do now that an
army officer has been detailed to the
University, was the chief topic dis-
cussed by the speakers at the battalion
smoker held at theUniversity of
Michigan Union last night.
"Michigan men have always done
their duty, and I know that they will
not fail their country in the present
crisis," was the introduction given by
President Harry B. Hutchins to a
reading of two letters, one announc-
ing that a military officer had been de-
tailed to the University, and the other
requesting medical students to con-
tinue their training in the Medical
school. The reading was greeted with
hearty response.
Emiphasizes Need of Practice
Captain Fowler, who has had charge
of the military tactics given during
spring vacation, emphasized the need
of practice in digging trenches and
trench fighting. He outlined the prac-
tical side of military training and
stated that army life was not all dress
parade, but was an exacting routine
of hard labor under conditions that
exhausted the men. "More shovels
have been worn out in Europe during
the present war than guns," he stated
in concluding his speech.
Tells of Difficulties
Prof. W. H. Hobbs spoke of the dif-
ficulty experienced by the University
authorities in securing the services of
an army officer at Michigan to take
charge of the training. He appealed
to the students' patriotism to support
the movement and to give the officer
their co-operation in every way pos-
sible.
Sergeant Ball, fresh from the
trenches in Europe, was given a rous-
ing reception by the student army as-
sembled. A vivid description of life
in the French trenches was presented
by Sergeant Ball. He stated that of
the honor ribbons passed out to Can-
adian troops 75 per cent had gone to
American men.
At the close of the smoker Captain
Fowler was presented with agold
watch by the battalion.
UNION OPERA MAKES
BIG HIT IN CITIES

Npen !sprng vacato 11n 4V1r
Questionnaires to
Alumni

"lit, I

During vacation most of the work of
getting out the questionnaires and in-
dexing the replies has been done by
University women in town over the
holidays, and it is planned to have,
them continue the work. The Wom-
en's league will have charge of the
work and Helen Bates, '18, is general
chairman.
The intelligence bureau here is to
co-operate with the intercollegiate in-
telligence bureau recently established
by the University of Pennsylvania.
FIRST MICHIGAN WOMAN TO
OFFER SERVICES TO U. S.
Dorothy Hall, '18E, is the first Uni-
versity of Michigan woman to offer
her services to the government in the
present war, having sent in her ap-
plication for a position in organic or
analytical research work in the United
States bureau of mines at Washing-
ton.
Dean Lloyd to Represent University
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd of the Gradu-
ate school has been appointed by
President Harry B. Hutchins to rep-
resent the University of Michigan at
the inauguration of Dr. W. A. Jessup
as president of the University of Iowa.
Registrar Hall to Attend Convention
Registrar Arthur G. Hall will leave
next Tuesday, April 24, for Lexing-
ton, Ky., to attend the eighth annual
meeting of the American Association
of Collegiate Registrars to be held at
the University of Kentucky from
April 25 to 27.

for

Royal Entertainment Provided
"Fools' Paradise" Troupe
During Trip

Playing before capacity houses in
each of the 'six cities visited, "Pools'
Paradise" scored the biggest hit of
any opera to be presented outside of
Ann Arbor. The performances were
all given with a smoothness and finish
rarely to be found in college. produc-
tions, the dancing of the chorus com-
ing in for especial praise.
Detroit, Toledo, Battle Creek, Grand
Rapids, Chicago, and Saginaw were
the cities visited, royal entertain-
ment being provided by the alumni in
each of these cities. The largest num-
ber witnessing any one performance
was in Chicago at the Auditorium the-
ater where over 5,000 people were
present. Dances were given in honor
of the troupe in each of the cities ex-
cept Toledo.
Symphonic League to Hold Banquet
The Symphonic league of the Uni-
versity School of Music will hold its
,fourth annual banquet in the parlors
of the Congregational church Wednes-
day evening. Miss Edna Toland, '17,
will be the toastmaster. Banquet tick-
ets are on sale at the School of Music
.and at the Annex.
To Mobilize Poster Pasters' Regiment
Chicago, April 16.-Director Eggers
of the Arch Institute plans to mobilize
2,800 students to paste posters urging
enlistment and boosting the back to
the farm movement.

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