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April 05, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-05

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN;
CONTINJED WARM

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VOL. XXVII. No. 133 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 1917 PRICE FIVE CE]

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THLETIC BOARD
CANCELS GAMES
O1F 1VARS5ITY TEAM
COACHES TO REMAIN EMPLOYED
IN INTRAMURAL DE-
PARTMENT
INTERCLASS CONTESTS
WILL BE ENCOURAGED
Men Are Asked to Continue to Report
in Order to Keep in Good
Physical Shape
War's grim actuality penetrated to
Michigan yesterday, when the board
in control of athletics, inpursuance of
the resolutions of the Regents, put a
ban on intercollegiate athletics.
All scheduled games for the track,
baseball, and tennis teams were can-
celled late yesterday by wire.
Although there will be no intercol-
legiate 'contests this spring, efforts
will be redoubled in the intramural
department to provide employment for
the men now trying out for Varsity
teais. Coaches of the various teams
will remain at their posts, and men
are urged to continue to report, in
order that they may keep in good
physical shape for teams when the ban
is lifted, or active service.
In regard to the present situation,
Athletic Director P. G. Bartelme gave
out the following statement:
Pursuant to the resolution of
the board of regents March 30
that in the event of actual hos-
tilities between this country and a
foreign power, all intercollegiate
athletic contests scheduled for this
University should be suspended,
the executive committee of the
board in control of athletics con-
cluded, that the track, tennis, and
baseball schedules should be at
once suspended.
In the meantime, interclass con-
tests and activities will be encour-
aged and fostered to the fullest ex-
tent possible in the belief that
they will afford suitable and de-
sirable exercises conducive to the
proper physical conditioning of
the young men of the University.
The committee stated further that
the athletic association would heartily
co-operate in whatever action may
be taken in furtherance of authorized
military training.
The spring training trip of the base-
ball team has been abandoned. Coach
Carl Lundgren, however, will continue
to instruct his men. Coach Steve Far-
rell intends to keep his men in phys-
ical trim throughout the season wheth-
er there be any meets or not.
HOLD ALUMNI MIXER
Port Huron Students Have Party to
Bring Men to University
} Port Huron students of the Univer-1
sity will held a Michigan mixer Thurs-
day, April 12, at the Masonic temple
in Port Huron.
More than 300 invitations have been
issued to alumni, students, and pros-
pective students, so the attendance
promises to be large. The party is
to be a Michigan extension affair for,
the purpose of getting more people to'

enroll in the University, especially
athletes and others who would espe-
cially be an aid to Michigan. The
alumni of Port Huron have endorsed
the plan and are co-operating with
the students to make it a big success.
Fresh Lits Meet Today for First Drill.
Organized at their class meeting
yesterday into drill companies all
fresh lits will assemble at 4 o'clock
this afternoon in front of the Library;
for a military drill lasting from 4 to
5:30 o'clock. Everyone is expected to
turn out.1

NLI.T. Students
[hurn LaliFollette
One Lone Pacifist Pleads Cause of
Effgy But Later Becomes
Belligerent
Boston, April 4.--Senator Robert
LaFollette, Wisconsin pacifist and
filibusterer, was burned in effigy last
night.
Students at Massachusetts institute
of technology made a dummy LaFol-
letth, tagged it that all might know it
was LaFollette, and then set it on fire.
Long lines of students executed an
Indian war dance singing and jeer-
ing. A lone. pacifist, the only one in
the dormitory, pleaded the burning
man's cause. The students gathered
about him and endeavored to change
his views by argument. The en-
deavor failed, and the pacifist was held
under a cold shower bath until he be-
came belligerent.
M. LNSON TO LECTURE
IN FRENCH AT 4 O'CLOCK
"CHARACTERISTICS OF FRENCH
MIND" TO BE SUBJECT
OF ADDRESS

I t

1200 MEN RESPOND TO
WEDNESDAYNIGHT DRILL
GYMNASIUMS AND ENGINEERING
BlUILDING OVER-CROWDED
BY LARGE ATTENDANCE
Michigan men are getting ready for
action. More than 1,200 students re-
ported for drill last night in the gym-
nasiums or the Engineering building.
Like all previous turn-outs during the
last few weeks the attendance showed
the regular increase and was easily
the largest of the year.
Every floor in the Engineering build-
ing was in use. Nearly one-third of
the entire number drilling were eng-
ineering students who received their
first instruction at the hands of class-
mates last night. The privilege of us-
ing the Engineering building greatly
relieved the congestion at the gym-
nasiums and made possible more effic-
ient work. Two companies were fore-
ed to drill out of doors in spite of
the additional sheltered space.
Draft New Officers
The great number of new men ne-
cessitated the drafting of new officers
as instructors of men who are still
new at the army game. Everyone last
night was busy learning the "school
of the soldier" and the "school of the
squad." The plan of the officers in
charge is to limit the work as far as
possible to these departments for the
present and then begin work in the
"school of the company" simultane-
ously. This will make it possible to

BY VOTE OF 82 TO 6 UPPER HOUSE OF CONG RESS
SUPPORTS WILSON RESOLUTiON, GIVING POWER Of"
DECLARING WAR INTO HAINDS OF REPRESENTATIVES

Detroit Officer
To Direct Drill,

SENATOR IHTCIICO-K LEADS DIS CuSSION
INC ENTIRE A BPIRO A-3L O
TRATION WTION

OF MEASURE I}Y VOIC
ADI3INIS-

Army Man to Train Men
Spring Vacation in New
ficers' Company

During
Of-

M. Gustave Lanson will lecture on
"Characteristics of the French Mind
as It Appears in Literature" at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in the Naturall

Science lecture room. Besides hold- keep the instructors uniform in meth-
ing the chair of French literature in ods.
the University of Paris, M. Lanson is More faculty men were out last
one of the advisors of the French gov- night than have yet reported at any
ernment in educational affairs and the drill. A large number of instructors
leading man of the country'in French ! in every department were drilling

literature.-
M. Lanson has receivedmany honors
from his country. He is a personal
friend of President Poincare and an
officer in the Legion of Honor. He is
professor of French literature at Co-
lumbia university.
The lecture this afternoon will be
given in French and students and fac-
ulty are invited.

PRE-TRIP

IS SUCCESSI

New Men Impressed in Chorus and
Cast; Sing National Hymn
From the time that the Spirit of
Folly starts forth from the fleecy
clouds of the kingdom of Fools until
the grand finale where the misunder-
standings of Dick and Daisy are solved
forever, the pre-trip performance of
"Fools' Paradise" was a rollicking
success.
New men in the chorus and cast
made the grain of some of the scenes
rather rough, but the small audience
seemed pleased to judge from the
number of encores.
When the end of "King Ragtime
Rules the World" came the orchestra
played the strains of "The Star
Spangled Banner"' and the song was
finished with the audience standing.
The rendition of "La Perjura" by
Carlos Zanelli in the second act
brought forth much applause.
HARVARD TO CANCEL TRACK
SCHEDULES IN CASE OF WAR
(Special to The Daily.)
Cambridge, Mass., April 4.-With
the declaration of war, the Harvard
track schedule will be canceled fol-
lowing the action of the graduate
track committee today.
All intramural and informal meets
will be encouraged so long as such
meets do not interfere with military
training. The coaches are to be re-
tained.
ADELPII 1)EFE A TS WEBSTER
SOCIETY IN FIRST DEBATE
Adelphi house of representatives de-
feated Webster Debating society last
night in the first preliminary of the
intersociety cup debates on the ques-
tion of compulsory military training.

along with the "rookies" and taking
orders from their own students. The
department of electrical engineering
was represented by Prof. John C.
Parker, Prof. Harry S. Sheppard, Mr.
Porter H_ Evans and Mr. George A.
Pomeroy.
Laws Join Drillers
Prof. Horace L. Wilgus of the Law
school, is taking an active part in the
organization of the law students.
They will form a company and drillI
regularly. Professor Wilgus will in-
augurate as soon as possible a short
course in military law which all stu-
dents interested may attend provided
it is possible to accommodate them.
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA MAKES
LAST APPEARANCE OF YEAR
The University Symphony orchestra
made its fourth and last appearance
of the year in Hill auditorium yester-
day afternoon.. The program was
opened by Beethoven's "Turkist
March," which was played in true
martial style, and the climax was
marked by the performance of Men-
delssohn's Symphony in A major,
which was unusually well played.
To Halt Americanization of Germans

Arrangements have been made to
carry on military training during
spring vacation. Captain Fowler of
the United States engineering corps
in Detroit, has been secured to train
the company and drill will be held
each day beginning next Saturday and
ending Monday, April 16.
The plan to 'continue training dur-
ing vacation was started by Prof. J.
A. Bursley of the mechanical engineer-
ing department and chairman of the
Military Training Camps' association
of the University and all questions
concerning the proposed new com-
pany will be answered by him.
Enlistments in the corps may be
mnade tomorrow and Friday at his of-
f ce in room 241 Engineering building
or in Dean John R. Effinger's office in
University hall. Only a limited num-
about 80, W2 be allowed to en-
The purpose of the company is to
train men to be able to become offi-
cers for the different corps when the
other students return from spring va-
cation. Drills will be held four hours
each day, from 1:45 to 5:45 o'clock.
Offer New Course
For '17 Engineers
Elementary Military Work to Be Given
Immediately After Spring
Vacation
Courses in elements of military en-
gineering will be offered to all senior
engineers for the rest of the semester
beginning immediately after spring re-
cess, according to a set of resolutions
adopted at a meeting of the engineer-
ing faculty yesterday afternoon.
The course will be open to qualified
students of the engineering college,
three hours credit toward graduation
being given. Provisions were made in.
the resolutions authorizing changes in
the present classification of seniors
wishing to take the new work. Stu-
dents dropping courses will be allowed
one-half credit for their work.
If iecessary present courses are
recom3 fended changed or even dis-
contined so as to give instructors
time for the new work. Control of
the course will be vested in a com-
mittee appointed by the dean of the
engineering college.

LAFOLLETTE UPHOLDS PAU fiSM IN IERY THREE HOUR SPEECH
Decision of Matter Now Up to Lowe r I l lere Committee Reports
"Accept Germany's Gage of B ' F ie e Vote by Friday
Night; Congress Conv cues vt 1 0'clok Today
Washington, April 4.-(Special)-The senate ite tonight passed the
war resolution by a vote of 82 to 6.
Only after Senator LaFollette had strugg 2e the side of further
consideration, Senator Hitchcock had anniouced his hearty support of
the administration motion, and Senator Wil a- hi scourged the Wis-
cosin member, Aid the watter coiO t a vote. ' as taken during a
portentious silence in the crowded aleries, where people had waited all
day for the climax.
The six senators who did not approve the mnot'on were: Lane of
Oregon, Grouna of North Dakota, Ltioleite of Wisconsin, Norris of Ne
braska, Stone of Missouri, and Bartan cf Mississippi.
With the resolution demanding war passed by the senate, it will next
come before the house. It is expec; d that it will pass there by an over-
wvheluming majority bef are Friday mii f.
Stormy scenes marked the lasi hours of Wedniesay in thie senate.
LaFollette spoke r three ho is against the war resolutions. At
times he shook his fiat ittader the n ' es 'nearby senators and at the
spectators in the galleries.
LaFollette declared Germany h in b "patien with vs and that she
should have told us to maintain oiuir neutrality."
John Sharp Williams followed ai referring to ILuFollette's speech
said
"Too bad he didn't defend the i n a 4c n of Beigin . Ills speech was
pro-German, pro-Goth, and pro-VanlaL"
Williams continued and asked:
"Which should we rather do, fight ermany now with England,
France, and Russia helping, or later alone? You've got to do one or the
other."

Bulletin
Washington, April 4.-The house
foreign affairs committee in a re-
port late tonight on the Martin'
war bill, which they presented to
the house, declared no course was
open to the government 4ut to
accept Germany's "gage of battle
and deelare that a state of war
exists"
By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, April 4. - Pacifism
noted intermittently during a historic
day, broke out in the senate late this
afternoon in full blast, when Senator
LaFollette, one of those branded as
the "willful 12" by President Wilson,
started his expected speech against
the passage of the state of war reso-
lution.
At that time it was predicted by
leaders of both parties that the senate
would pass the measure by 8 or 9
o'clock tonight at the latest. If so,
the house is ready for it. That body
is expected to pass it in a few hours
after it receives it. The house meets
at 10 o'clock tomorrow morning.
LaFollette's speech followed shortly
after a sensational clash in which a
dozen solons denounced Norris of Ne-
braska for a speech the latter made.
The clash was as bitter as any that
have marked senate debate. Reed of
Missouri branded some of Norris' re-
marks as "giving aid and comfoto
the enemy."
Senator LaFollette enered the up-
per chamber for the first time today
shortly before 4 o'clock, and began
speaking. There was an air of ex-
pectancy as.LaFollette rose slowly to
is feet. Senators who had absented
themselves, quickly returned to their
seats; and the galleries stirred-nerv-
ously.
LaFollette Reads Letter

country bears a prayer that there will
be no war."
After reading a number of letters
demanding a vote against the war, La-
' ollette Lunched into a defense of his
action in opposing the armed neu-
trality bill.
^ made an investigation and came
to the cowclusion that it was futile
s lead our men into peril," he said.
"The representatives of the president
upon the floor sought by means I do
not care to characterize, to prevent
me from speaking. I regret to say
that the president, according to the
press, and it has not been denied, saw
fit to characterize the senators who
opposed the armed neutrality bill as
';illful.' I know of no graver charge
that could be made against public of-
ficials than that they were willful,
that is, perverse."
Talks of Letters of Praise
LaFollette then spoke of the thou-
sands of letters and telegrams he had
received since his opposition to the
bill. Ile declared they were from 44
states of the Union, and when assorted
were in the proportion of about eight
(Continued on Page Eight.)
UNION MAILS OUT
QUESTIONNAIRES
Students Asked to Give Information
Which Will Be Indexed for
Only in Time of Need
Every student in the University will
receive a letter today. Co-operating
with the intercollegiate intelligence
bureau the Michigan Union mailed
more than 5,900 letters to Ann Arbor

Washington, April 4.-Natives of v
Germany shall not be admitted to Deutscher Verein to Elect Members
citizenship after the state of war reso- Deutscher Verein will meet at 8
lution passes, Mr. Raymond Crisp, o'clock tonight in the Verein rooms
naturalization commissioner, ruled to- for the purpose of electing new mem-
day. bers into the organization.
Resolutions Passed by Senate
The administration resolution reads:
"Joint resolution, declaring that a state of war exists between the
imperial German government and the government and people of the
United States, and making provisions to prosecute the same, whercas
the recent act of the imperial German government is an ac ': war
against the government and the people of the Un .
"Be it resolved by the senate and the house o representatives of
the United States of America in congress assemb d, That the state of
war between the United States and the imperia, German government,
which has thus been thrust upon the United Stales, is hereby formally
declared, and that the president be, and he is hereby authorized and di-
rected to take immediate steps not only to put the country in a
thorough state of defense, but also to exert all of its power and em-
ploy all of its resources to carry on war against the imperial Ger-
man government to bring the conflict to a successful termination."

I

students last night.
The letters are in the form of a
questionnaire, covering every Ocupa-

"I hold a letter sent to me by Rep- tion and 'experience in any line the
resentative Helgeson of North Da- men or women of the University may
kota, who lies ill in a hospital in this have had. No one is put under any-
city," LaFollette began. "He sent obligations by giving the requested In-
word that every message and tele- formation, which is for index purposes
gram sent to him from out in the to be used. only in time of need.

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