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April 01, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I CLOUDY AND COOL

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UNITED PF
DAY AND NO
WIRE SERY]

1 r/lY . 'Y[YTTt 1TT XT.. H Afi ".:

I

\!UL .XXVII. iNo. 1.0

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 1917.

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_ - - -- u _ I - - -- --

MASS MIETING ON
Henry L. Sthnson, Taft's Secretary of
War, to Discuss Cham-
berlain Bill
REGENTS, PRESIDENT, .AND
FACULTY WILL BE ON STAGE
Naial Militia Will Attend, Headed in
March by University
Band ..
Classes will be dismissed; the band
will be there; the platform will be
decorated with flags and colors. The
board of regents, President Harry B.
Hutchins, and members of the faculty
will sit on the stage at the mass meet-
ing to be held at 3:30 o'clock tomor-
row afternoon in Hill auditorium, at
which Hon. Henry L. Stimson, form-
erly secretary of war during the Taft
administration, and Dr. Frederick R.
Coudert of the New York bar will dis-

Quit Jaseball To
Commence Drill

[Y WEDGES PRESS
TOWARDGERMAN BASE
ARRIVAL OF SPRING WEATHER
INCREASES INTENSITY OF
FIGHTING

I

I

E

WAR SPIRIT PREAIL'S
IN NA1TION'S CAPITAL

One hundred and fifty members of
seven State street fraternities aban-
doned their baseball games yesterday
afternoon to learn -military tactics,
and spent an hour in marching up and
down State street.
These are men who have already
joined the University corps. The drills,
which are expected to take place every
noon, are meant only' as a supplement
to the regular training that they get
in the gymnasium. The fraternities
from which the men came are the Chi
Psi, Psi Upsilon, Alpha Delta Phi,
Sigma Chi, Delta Kappa Epsilon,
Beta Theta Pi, and Acacia house.
Drill was under the supervision of
men who have had previous training.
Those in charge were: H. E. Montelius
'18, P. S. Lowe, '18E, Paul Moore, '20,
and D. U. Bathrick, '18, all of whom
have attended Culver Military acad-
emy; also C. K. Patterson, '17, and J.
A. West, '20A. Patterson learned mili-
tary ethics at the Western Military
academy, and West at St. Johns.
At the conclusion of the drill the
men marched down to Ferry field and
back. Two or three members of the
faculty were in line.

By Ed. L. Keen
London, March 31. - Two wedges
driven into the German lines close to
the famous "Hindenburg 'front" by
British and French troops appeared
tonight likely to force the Germans
from the important base city of St.
Quentin.
The city is menaced by a vigorous
forward sweep of Field Marshal
Haig's troopssouth from Peronne, and
an equally determined French advance
upward from Ham and Guiscard. The
rate of speed which these two armies
have shown in the past few days ser-
iously threatens St.Quentinaon three
sides. The British swept along more
than a mile over a seven mile front
toward the city, while the French were
battling along toward the same goal.
The British took five villages and
towns, including the important city
of Vermand.
An improvement in the weather
with the arrival of spring has resulted
in a tremendous increase in the in-
tensity of the fighting all along the
line. The repulse of two German at-
tacks northwest of Cregney directed
against positions wrested earlier in'
the day from the retreating enemy was
reported in tonight's official statement.
The German attacks were thrown back'
before the French fire. The statement
also reported an aerial bombing raid
by German forces over the Dunkirk
region in which two civilians were
killed and three wounded.{

"AMERICAN INTERESTS DEM
THAT GERMANY BE
BEATEN"
By Robert J. Bender
Washington, March 31.-Real
spirit prevailed in the nation'sc
ital today.
Government departments mo
rapidly forward in the completion
plans to enter the world struggle
a gigantic scale. Twelve additio
militia organizations were called
the colors, adding about 6,000 m
making the total now doing po
duty throughout the country more t
50,000.

ALNJ
war
cap-
ved
of
on
anal
to
aen,
lice
khan

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MASS MEETING
In order to give all students
an opportunity to attend the
mass meeting to be held in Hill
auditorium in the interest of
nation'al defense at 3:30 o'clock
Monday afternoon, April 2, all
regular exercises of the Univer
sity will be suspended fronm 3
to 5 o'clock.
H. B. HUTCHINS,
President.
Members of thq military units
and the naval reserves will meet
at Waterman gymnasium at 3
o'clock and march from there to
the auditorium.
Members of the band willmeet
with the military units at 3
o'clock.
The President of the Univer-
sity, members of the board of
regents, speakers, and invited
guests will assemble at 3:15
o'clock in the room on the first
floor, west of the stage, of the
auditorium, entering the build-
ing by the rear door.
Members of the faculties are
invited to sit on the stage
and will assemble at 3:15
o'clock in the second floor room,
west of the stage of the auditor-
ium, entering the building by
the rear door.
The meeting will begin at
3:30 o'clock..

ALL MEDICS AG
ON pERORI
VOLUNTARY

1;

cuss universal military training as
embodied in the Chamberlain bill now
before congress.
Prof. William. H. Hobbs will preside
at the meeting which is given under
the auspices of the Ann Arbor branch
of the National Security league of
which Professor Hobbs is president.
Ex-Secretary Stimson and Dr.
Coudert are making an extensive tour
of the middle west where they are
lecturing in the leading cities under
the auspices of the chambers of com-
merce on the national crisis and the
country's need for universal service.
Both men speak in Detroit tomorrow
night and were obtained by the local
league to address the student body'
and the citizens of Ann Arbor tomor-
row afternoon.
Students and the public are invited
to attend. A section in the auditor-
ium will be reserved for members of
the National Security league and their
wives.
An important feature of the meet-
ing will be the parade of the Seventh
and Eighth divisions of the First bat-t
talion of Michigan naval militia and
the volunteer military battalion,l
headed by the University band, whichI
will march to the auditorium and oc-
cupy a section reserved for it.1
The committees in charge of the
meeting are the committee on seat-
ing, headed by Prof. C. W. Cook; the
committee on marching, headed byf
Major C. E. Wilson, and the commit-t
tee in charge of invitations and tick-f
,ets headed by Prof. S. L. Bigelow. c

JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY
FOLLOWS LUNCHEON

"Kaiser Cave Man"
A determined note of hostility and
bitter invective was sounded by con-
gressional leaders as the law making
body of the country prepared to as-
semble in its session of next week.
"The interests of America demand
that Germany be beaten," declared
Senator Simmons, one of the foremost
Democratic leaders in congress. "The
kaiser is a cave man with murder in
his heart," said Representative Eagle
of Texas. "He must be put down or
the democracies of the world are
doomed."
But, with all, there is no excitement,
no flurry. Congressmen, as well as
administration heads of the govern-
ment, are going about their work in
a calm, deliberate manner. The fed-
eral farm loan board announced that
more than $200,000,000 will be loaned
out by the federal land bankers dur-
ing the coming year to intensify the
farming industry in the country as a
"back of the trenches" preparedness

Queen of the Campus Is Involved in
Love Affair With Fresh-
man
"Felicia Finesses," the annual
Junior Girls' play, passed through a
second performance following the
Michigan women's luncheon yesterday
afternoon.
The lead role of Felicia Blythe, the
University woman who has all the
mnen in Michigan at her beck and tall,
is realistically, portrayed by Louise
Hatch. Girl friends plot to have her
fall in love with a good looking fresh-
man. The queen of the campus be-
comes interested in the wearer of the
gray cap, but her guardian objects.
The freshman consoles himself by
wedding the chief of the plotters. The
clever acting of Winifred Corcoran
and Beatrice Fales aid the production,
while the'clogging specialty of Mabel
Hall in the second act brought ap-
plause.
CREASE DANCE FOR SENIOR
LAWS WILL BE APRIL 27
The annual senior law Crease 'in-
formal dance will be held from 8:30
to 1 o'clock Friday evening, April7
27, at the Union. Shook's J-hop or-
chestra has been engaged to furnish

I

OPERA SCENARIO
CONTEST REOPENS

Lenten Meetings Held in Lane Hall
A series of Lenten meetings will be
conducted' every evening from 5 to
5:20 o'clock in Lane hall beginning to-
morrow evening and ending Friday.
These meetings will be led either by
students or student pastors and are
open to all University men.
Patients Tax Capacity of Hospital
All available space in the Univer-
sity hospital has been taken up for
the first time in the history of the
institution. There are over 350
patients confined in the - different
wards. Only in cases of emergency
are new patients admitted.
Martin Feinstein Addresses Menorah
"Early Biblical Reminiscences of
Ancient Babylonia," will be the sub-
ject of an address to be given by Mr.
Martin Feinstein of the rhetoric de-
partment before the Menorah society
at 8 o'clock this evening in Newberry
hall.
Art Exhibit Is Open This Afternoon
The Ann Arbor Art association ex-
hibit in Alumni Memorial hall will be
open this afternoon from 2:30 to 5
o'clock. It will be open to the pub-
lic until April 6.

1F

Work Toward Cash Prizes Will be
Outlined in Meeting Tues-
day

measure.

i

American Lives Lost
The national defense counsel drew
plans for co-ordinating all the na-
tional preparedness measures except
purely military steps for submission
to President Wilson. Even while the
active steps were being taken for the
vigorous entrance of the United States
into the war against Germany the lat-
est act of the imperial government
against the United States was report-
ed at the state department, the killing
of two Americans aboard the tor-
pedoed Britisher Cristin. Eighteen
more persons are missing. The news
caused no material reaction here.
Since it Chas been determined that the
country is to meet Germany with the
sword, the only effect of added insults
is to strengthen the determination of
government officials. This determina-
tion is also strengthened by hundreds
of telegrams to President Wilson that
the country is ready to back him in
whatever steps he deems necessary.
Thousands of men and women, di-
vided in their views on peace or war,
promise to invade the capital Monday
and carry their respective messages
to the nation's war making body.

Because of the cash prizes now to
be awarded, the scenario contest for

t
r

next year's opera book will be reopen-
ed. A special meeting will be held at
4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the
Union, at which time Arthur Schupp,
'17E, general chairman of "Fools' Par-
adise," will outline the work and tell
the form in which the scenarios
should be presented. Everyone inter-
ested in writing either the scenario or
dialogue for next year's opera is urged
to attend.
No limitations as to local color will
be made this year, the best scenario
presented being the one that will be
selected regardless of setting. The
scenarios are to be presented some
time before the end of May, the exact
time to be decided later, so that the
successful one may be chosen and then
turned over to the dialogue writers.
In this way it is hoped to have the
work well under way before the end
of this school year.
THREE UNARMED AMERICAN
SHIPS RUN GERMAN BLOCKADE

ENROLL IN TRAINING I:6P
E DER WAR ORDES
NO. 49
OFFICERS COME AS
SOON AS "POSSI
Senior Pharmics and Chemistry
dents Agree to Give Profes,
sional Services
"Officers will be furnished Jusi
quickly and as fully as the pi
ent condition of the governm
will permit under general i
orders No. 49," said Major C.
Wilson yesterday when questioi
regarding the effect of the 2
gents' vote upon the supplying
officers for military training in
University. "Our chance, howei
because of the present situati
depends upon the number of s
dents enrolling under the yolu
tary training."
All Medics Volunteer
With a unanimous enrollment
voluntary military training s
every student of the Medical s
will drill under war orders No.
Following up their stand I
Thursday, when only eight ad
ballots were cast on military tra
in the entire school, the men o
four classes organized companies
terday and choose student officers
have had previous experience in
tary tactics.-
Marching in a body, five me
companies will attend the mass i
ing to be held at 3:30 o'clock to
row in Hill auditorium.
In speaking of the movement,'
Paul H. De Kruif of the bacteric
department, who served on the 9
can border last summer and has.
sisted in organizing the medical c
said, "The promptness of actio'
the part of the medical students w
indicate that they are not intendlil
wish service upon others, as cei
pacifists, instructors, and individ
would have us believe. It migh'
pointed out that shells and bullet
not exercise a selective action or
feet, but hit medical men as wel
others."
Fresh Medics Drill
The freshman class, largest in i
ber, formed two companies of 60
each, and started drilling yestei
afternoon in front of the Me
building. Only five of the 120
absent. Qfficers for Company A
Captain, P. M. Ireland, '18; first i
tenant, W. D. Stinson, '20, and se
lieutenant, G. F. Moore,.'20. Offi
for Company B are: Captain, H.
Smith, '19L; first lieutenant, C.
Hickey, '20M; second lieutenant, I
Barnes, '20M.
. A company has been organized
each of the other three classes,
ficers of the senior company =
Captain, J. W. Jones, '17M; first
second lieutenants, T. M. Marks, ':
and J. R. Poppen, '17M; fr
juniors: Captain, J. R. Darnall, '1
first and second, lieutenants, H
Spaulding, '18M, and Parker He
'18M; and for the sphomores:
tain, R. L. Novy, '19M; first and
ond lieutenants, J. M. McKinney,
and H. F. Becker, '19M.
Senior Pharmies Sign
Out of 32 senior pharmis, 27 hi
signed the petition which has b
circulating, stating that i case of
the signers will offer their professi4
services to Secretary A. B. stev
to be used as he sees fit.
Practically all of the two ul
classes of the chemistry departn
have also signed a petition to the
feet that 'they will aid the governn
along professional lines in 'case
need.

ARRANGE SOPH PROM
Appoint Committees for Dance of Sec-
ond Year Men
Plans have been formulated for the
soph prom to be given at the Armory,
Friday night, May 11. E. N. Miller,
head of the social committee, has ap-
pointed'the following men to serve on
the various committees: Music, D. M.
Springer and C. T. Van Dusen; pro-
grams, 'tickets, and invitations, F. C.
Bell, R. S. Bridge, and A. E. Zigler;
refreshments, D. P. Yerkes; arrange-
3nents, J.I. McClintock; publicity, H.
J. Mack.
Tickets will go on sale immediately
after spring vacation. The music will
be furnished by the Wright orchestra
from Columbus.
"TOASTMASTERS DINE TUESDAY
WITH ANNIVERSARY BANQUET

the music.
"The Crease" will be distributed
during the intermission. This maga-
zine sets forth the humorous side of
the lawyers' last year in the Univer-
sity. William L. Owen, '17L, is the
editor-in-chief.
The chaperons will be Dean Henry
M. Bates and Mrs. Bates, and Prof.'
John R. Rood and Mrs. Rood. Tickets
will be limited to 100 and will go on
sale to the members of the senior law
class next Tuesday morning. They
will cost $1.50 each and may be ob-
tained from the 'following members of
the social committee: A. P. Kelley,
chairman; H. i. Johnson, H. N. Pritz-
ker, and C. R. Lokker.
PROF. C. L. MEADER TO TALK
ON THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION
Prof. Clarence L. Meader of the
Latin department will address the
Students' society of the Unitarian
church on "Russia and the Revolu-
tion," at 6:30 o'clock this evening.
The meeting will be held in the church
parlors at the corner of State and
Huron streets, and the public is in-
vited to attend.
Prof. Robert W. Hegner of the Zool-
ogy department will give an illus-
trated talk on "Preservation of Bird
Life" at 11:45 o'clock this morning.

President George B. Stewart
Speaks to YOU
Presbyterian Church
Tonight, 7:30 P. M.
12 M., University Bible Class
6:30 P. M, Young Peoples Service
l First Methodist Church+

ow,

New York, March 31.-Three Ameri-
can ships, unarmed, arrived in Ameri-
can waters today, having made the
European trip through Germany's
barred zone established about England
and France. They were the tanker
Gold Shell, New Orleans, which, with
the freighter Rochester, was the first
to sail from N York, and' the Mon-
golia;
* Members May i4re Tickets *
*

'The Toastmasters will hold their,
.anniversary banquet at 6 o'clock next
Tuesday evening at the Catalpa Inn.
A special program with several fac-
-ulty speakers has been arranged, and
toasts will be given by a number of
the members after the dinner.

A. W. Stalker, D. D., Minister
10:30--Palm Sunday
7:30--"Volunteer or Conscript"

*
*
*
*
*

Members of the N onal S ur-
ity league and their wives can'ase-.
cure a limited number of tickets
entitling them to reserved seats
at the. mass meeting t, be held
Monday, April 2, at 3: 3o'clock in
Hill auditorium, by applying in
person at acheoffice of tbg Alumni
association, in'*AJ.umni Memorial
hall, between the hours of 9 and
12' o'clock, and .1 and 2:30o'clock,
Monday.

.

* * * * * * ~ * * 7

U. need.

I I

DON'T

t

MISS
THIS
TALK!

THE LAST TALK OF THE SERIES
"BUSINESS AS A PROFESSION"
WILL -E GIVEN BY
PROF. I. L. SHARFMAN

SOME
REAL
IDEAS!

GET

TU-MGHT

LANE HALL

6:30-7:30,

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