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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 30, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

Just Arrived

C & K

C.& K.

SOCIETY BRAND

SUITS

Spring Showing
of the

and Top Coats for Spring

A Large Shipment of
Stetson Hats

Crofut & Knapp Hats
$3.50 and $4.00
See Our Windows for
Shapes and Colors
TINKER & COMPANY
Cor. S. State and William Sts.

Come in and see our new line of Spring Hats and
Furnishings.
We make Suits to your measure from $16.50 up.
NEXT TO ORPHEUM

In the Latest Designs

m

C. & K.

C. & K.

Wadhams & Co.
State Street Main Street

Your Floral Needs--
Are BEST SATISFIED By Us
PHONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION

-=COUSINS & ALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Men's Real LEATHER Belts $ 00 to $1.50
With Silver Belt Buckles $1
Buying one of these belts is buying a belt "once for always."
The buckles are made in patent designs that make them last for
years. In novel effects-hand hammered silver, hand engraved
silver, engine turned silver and plain polished silver. One of
these belts with the owner's initials engraved on the buckle, makes
a useful and inexpensive gift.
H ALLER & FULLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS

f

kBlackmer' Positive Pump
Stock Subscriptions
Will Be Discontinued
IN A FEW DAYS.
Persons who wish to subscribe or those who wish to in-
crease their subscriptions, should
Notify Us Immediately
Not another subscription will be received when the allot-
ment is taken. Subscriptions may be signed at our store, 221
East Liberty street, or our representative will call on you if re-
quested. Appointment can be made by telephone. No. 1321-F2.
SPRAGUE-BLACKMER.
ENGINEERING CO.

CONGRESSMAN SMITH
IN FAVOROF TRINING
DOES NOT THINK WAR WILL
MEAN SENDING ARMIES
TO EUROPE
"I believe that there should be com-
pulsory military training in every high
school and college in the United
States," said Congressman J. M. C.
Smith of the third district, when in-
terviewed yesterday afternoon.
"Of course," said Congressman
Smith, "credit should be given for
hours spent in training and drill the
same as for any other course. And,
since many are denied the privilege of
attending high school or college, I be-
lieve that some provision should be
made for instructing this class of peo-
ple."
When asked about the Chamberlain
bill he said, "I do not know whether
the Chamberlain bill will pass con-
gress or not. That is a question
which it is impossible to answer at
the present time. If the bill is passed
it will mean that 4,000,000 young men
less than 20 years of age and perhaps
10,000,000 men more than 20 years
old will be set in motion immediately.
This may at first seem extravagant
and unnecessary, but something must
be done to awaken our sensibilities to
the necessity of preparation. When
we consider that, until the last few
weeks, more men were leaving the
army- than were enlisting, we see at
once the necessity of conscription.
"I firmly believe," continued Con-
gressman Smith, "that congress is
called together next week for the pur-
pose of declaring war. I think that
President Wilson, in his message, will
show that every resource has been
exhausted in an effort to prevent war,
but since these have failed there is
but one thing to do if we are to pre-
serve our national honor."
Congressman Smith went on to show
that a declaration of war is necessary
at the present time if we are to make
clear our status as a nation. Under
our present status we cannot prevent
intrigue, stop spying, or seize Ger-
man ships in our ports. Neither can
we open our ports to the ships of the
allies under present conditions.
"I do not believe that it will mean
the sending of large armies to Eu-
rope," said Congressman Smith, "al-
though we can do it if necessary. I
think that the war will end as soon
as we master the submarine situation,
and American ingenuity has never
been wanting in time of need. Now,
as we stand on the border of a great
conflict, let every man determine to
uphold the flag, and have for his
watchword, 'once in, everything for
victory,' and there will be no doubt of
our success."
Congressman Smith has a son, W.
P. Smith, '19, attending the University
at the present time.
William F. Strecker, Ann Arbor
Jeweler, died yesterday morning at his
home, 529 Sixth street, after a linger-
ing illness. The Rev. A. L. Nicklas
will officiate at the private funeral
services which will be held at 1:30
o'clock Friday afternoon at the home.
Alumni to Banquet in Grand Rapids
The University of Michigan Alumni
association of western Michigan will
hold its annual banquet tomorrow
evening at the Peninsular club in

MANY ATTEND CIVIC
ASSOCIATION EXHIBIT
DIRECTOR OF DAYTON MUNICIP-
AL EXHIBIT PLEASED WITH
LOCAL AFFAIR
Containing many exhibits of inter-
est to Michigan students, the Civic as-
sociation exhibit at the City hall is at-
tracting an/unexpected number of vis-
itors this week. The attendance yes-
terday was above the 700 mark. Many
men interested in civic affairs have
come to Ann Arbor for the exhibit.
Dr. Upton of Detroit, who managed
the exhibit at Dayton, expressed yes-
terday his surprise at the splendid
features and completeness of the ex-
hibit.
Exhibitions In the administration
department are instructive to students
of economics and sociology. The In-
hoff tank for sewage disposal, the
samples of sewers, the charts on city
planning, and the exhibit of the Detroit
Edison company afford sources of in-
struction for the engineering students.
A collection of weapons from the
police department, each with the story
of some crime back of it, are also on
exhibition.
TO RAISE $5,000 FOR
BUSRAH RELIEF WORK
Three Hundred Men to Campaign for
Arabian Fund Second Week
After Vacation
Three hundred men will constitute
the campaigning force with which the
University "Y" expects to raise $5,000
for Busrah the second week after
spring vacation. The sum of $5,000
is sufficient to send another doctor
and nurse to Arabia.
Interest of the University "Y" first
turned to Busrah in 1910 when Charles
E. Shaw, '10E, offered $10,000 and his
life devotion to engineering work in
Busrah if the Students' Christian as-
sociation would send a doctor. The
Bennetts happened to be already sta-
tioned at Busrah and Mr. H. G. Van
Vlack, 'OM, and Miss Minnie Holz-
hauser, '13, sailed in 1913 for Arabia.
This was the nucleus for the little
colony of Michigan m.en and women
who have done work among the na-
tives in medical and missionary lines.
Two years ago the war compelled
Mr. Shaw and Mr. Haynes, '10E, to
withdraw. Four of the colony are at
Busrah now. Miss Holzhauser reached
the city in time to be of valuable serv-
ice during the fighting between the
Turks and the British at Busrah.
Lately the friendship of the most pow-
erful sheik in Arabia has been se-
cured. This will prove of value in
the work contemplated at Busrah.
TO USE BARBOUR GYMNASIUM
FOR RED CROSS HEADQUARTERS
The parlors in Barbour gymnasium
have been turned over to the Ameri-
can Red Cross for the headquarters
of the local chapter recently organ-
ized here; This action was taken at
a special meeting of the board of di-
rectors held Wednesday afternoon to
determine what immediate activities
are open to the women of the Univer-
sity by which they can meet the pres-
ent national crisis.
The war 'relief work which the
Women's league has been doing once
a week will be greatly increased, and
plans are now under way to have this

FOR ELECTRIC REPAIRS
OF ALL KINDS CALL
Washtenaw Electric Shop
The Shop of Qualty
11Jits net Right we make it Right
Phone 273 200 East Washington St.
CULTIVATING THE CLOTHES SENSE-
No way to do it but to see as many clothes as pos-
sible that are excellently made-of well-combined
colors-and of graceful lines.
Coming to the Hutzel Shop often will show you
what to wear and how to wear it.

MAIN AND LIBERTY

-I

TYPEWRITERS
For Rent or Sale
Typewriting
Multigraphing
MAmeopBaphing
Hamilton S. College
State and Minan

I

Easter
Suits/
N (OW is th time to place
your order f o r that
Spring Suit.
We offer port styles and
business styles in all wool
fabrics.

I

U.

Hutzel 's

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
System

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Bo,
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

TALBOT
rmWCOLLARS
are Curve cu to ft th
shoulde
Shirts made to measure. G. H. Wild
Co., Leading Merchant Tailors. State
St. ti
There is opportunity in The Michi-
gan Daily Ads. Read them.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.

Hospital Notes
Two more victims of the scarlet fev-
er epidemic have been added to the
list of student patients. Albert A.
Clark, '19, came down with the disease
Wednesday morning at the Alpha Del-
ta Phi fraternity on State street.
Clark was immediately removed to
the contagious ward of the University
hospital and the fraternity placed un-
der quarantine. Four hours later, the
house was fumigated and the quaran-
tine lifted.
V. J. Husted, '19E, is the other stu-
dent who has been removed to the con-
tagious hospital for scarlet fever.
Husted has a slight case and will prob-
ably be discharged in a few weks.
Phillips B. Preston, '17, who came
down with the fever at Chi Psi fra-
ternity, has just passed the crisis and
is on the road to recovery. Preston's
mother has been with him during the
past week. James P. Adams, '19, an-
other victim, is now recovering and
will be discharged next week.
According to Dr. H. H. Cummings
of the University health service, the
epidemic is being successfully check-
ed.
Andrew D. Althouse, '19, has been
removed to the University hospital be-
cause of an attack of pericarditis.
The epidemic of German measles is
still prevalent among the students. So
many cases of the fever have been re-
ported that it is impossible to place
the patients in the contagious ward of
the University hospital, and they are
quarantined in their rooms. Henry
L. Smith, '20, is the latest victim.
PROF. W. L. SCHURZ TO LECTURE
BEFORE COSMOPOLITAN CLUB
Novel motion pictures showing the
life in modern Chili accompanied by
a lecture concerning some phase of
the history of that republic by Prof.
William L. Schurz will be given un-
der the auspices of the Cosmopolitan
club in the Natural Science auditor-
ium at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon.
No admission fee will be charged.
-The pictures will exhibit activities
in the principal cities, apropos of the
business districts, the residential sec-
tions, and the public squares and gar-
dens. The capitol at Santiago will
be shown with all its stateliness and
fineness. The Chilian army, which
is the most nearly complete and best
equipped in Latin-America, will be
seen on parade and in practice.
Place Exhibit in Science Building
Over 20 glass wall cases of various
sizes are now stationed in the corridor
on the second floor in the New Science

NOTICE

Fools' Paradise, Official Scores, and
Sheet Music for sale at Schaeberle &
Son's Music House.-Adv. tf
If $6.00 a day .for next summer in-
terests you, call 433-M.-Adv. 28-30-1
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

THE
Varsity Toggery
SHOP
1107 So. Univ.
building which will be filled for the
spring exhibit with specimens of gen-
eral interest from the departments of
geology, zoology, and forestry.
Landscapers to Work at Martha Cook
The landscape design department is
only waiting for the return of suitable
weather to begin contemplated im-
provements on the campus. The east
side of Martha Cook dormitory will
be one of the places to which the land-
scape men will turn their attention.

I

*At its April meeting, the Board in
Control of Student Publications will
choose a business manager and manag-
ing editor for the Students Directory.
It is the policy of the board in filling
the positions on the publications un-
der its control, to award them on the
basis of merit to those who have serv-
ed in minor positions on the publica-
tions to which the positions pertain.
It sometimes happens, however, that
no one who has served on the publica-
tions during the year is eligible or
capable of filling one of the leading
positions for the ensuing year. When
such circumstances arise, the board
finds it necessary to consider outside
candidates. This notice should not be
considered as an intimation that these
circumstances will arise this year.
All applications for these positions
should be in the hands of Professor F.
N. Scott, on or before April 2, in order
to be considered. Each application
should contain a statement of the ex-
perience of the applicant and should
be accompanied by the applicant's
eligibility card and any letters of rec-
ommendation which he may have.
BOARD IN CONTROL OF
- STUDENT PUBLICATIONS.
23, 27, 29, 30.
Get your shoes fixed at Paul's Place,
511 E. William St. 5tf
"The Price She Paid", the latest
Clara Kimball Young picture, and said
to be one of her best, will be shown at
The Arcade next Monday and Tuesday.
The admirers of Miss Young and
moving picture fans generally are sure
to go into ecstacies over this photo-
play. Matinee, 15c; evening, 25.-
Adv.

WANTED

LOST

I

Grand Rapids. President Harry B. work done every afternoon, and every
Hutchins has been invited to attend. morning.

WANTED- By married couple-stu-
dents, light housekeeping rooms
near New Engineering building. Box
15, Michigan Daily. 29-3
WANTED-Lady for educational work
in Grand Rapids this summer, $240.
Phone 359-M. 30-31-1
WANTED -Furnished room for lady
and little girl (7 years) for a few
weeks. Prefer north of the cam-
pus. References exchanged. Phoney
Mrs. Watson, 1892. 29-30

LOST-Gamma Phi Beta sorority pin
with G. A. Miller, '99, written on
back. Finder please return to

Daily.

27-81

MISCELLANEOUS
BARGAIN- Typewriter. Paid $100,
will sell for $30. Machine in excel-
lent condition. 711 N. University.
29-30-31
USE Daily Want-Ads.

11

We will mail

FOOLS' PARADISE
To any address for you.
Call us up, and open up an account.

Score

and Music

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Main St.

Phone 1707

1l

I, 'I

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