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March 30, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

April 8th

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ANNOUNCEMENT

SAM BURCHFIELD

& CO.

Official newspaper at the University of
Mrgan. Published every morning except
M_-nday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
'Jifice t Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub
+criptions; by carrier $2.o; by mail, $ggoo
Want ad. stations: (5uarrys; Student' Sup-
p1y Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Pyones: Bsiness, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 380 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lshed in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Bnsiness Manager
Conrad N. Church.............News Editor
Iee X. Joslyn........City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald.....Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jaeksn.....Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson.............Women's Editor
Leonard W. Nieter.. ..Ass't Telegraph Editor
DeForrest S. Rood.........Exchange Editor
J. E. Cam ,bll...Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Smery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert . Horn..,Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau... Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter .Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
C. M. Jickling H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney J. L. Stadeker
L. S. Thompson E. L. Zeigler
H. C. Garrison
wi Reporters
C. S. Clark James Schermerhorn, Jr.
R. H. Fricken G. O. Brophy
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighel
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood F. A. Taber
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
C. C. Andrews R. T. McDonald
C. L. Goldstein
Business Staff
Paul E. CholettesHarry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
Bernard WVohl
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1917.
Night Editor-G. O. Brophy
"MICHIGAN FOR AMERICA"
"Michigan for America," the words
emblazoned on the banner, typified the
spirit of the parade last night which
if headed. "Michigan for America"
typified the spirit of the all-campus
vote yesterday which endorsed by a
majority of more than four to one com-
pulsory military training to apply at
once to all students of the University.
Michigan is one of the last large
universities to take definite steps to
aid the country in the present grave
crisis, but the decisiveness of our ac-
tion yesterday proves that Michigan
will be in the front rank if war comes.
In one tense the vote yesterday
was taken hurriedly, but it represents
an expression of opinion which has
been maturing in the minds of Michi-
gan students since the critical situa-
tion of the country became apparent.
We want to call the attention of those
few who cry that the vote was "rail-
roaded" through and does not fairly
represent Michigan sentiment to the
parade organized spontaneously and
participated in by more than 2,000 stu-
dents who were not "crying for war,"
but who wanted to show that they
stood behind their country on .the eve
of war.
The crisis has united Michigan just
as it is uniting the country. Michigan
is prepared to do its duty, but it is
not prepared for war. The adoption
by the Regents today of general or-
ders No. 49 would provide us with the
officers and equipment necessary to
train.
Michigan is for America-a prepar-
ed America.

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the sod is soft you can do much to-
ward beautifying the campus.
It appears from the vote that there
are mighty few of us who are "too
proud to fight."
CRITICIZES YOTE METHODS
SAYS SPIRIT OF MILITARY TRAIN.
INC RESOLUTIONS NOT CARRIED
OUT IN DISCUSSION
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
University of Michigan students
have always stood for an honest and
intelligent vote and I am sure this
was desired"on the question of mili-
tary training.
To secure such a ballot we should
have had plenty of time for Daily dis-
cussion and we should have held a
mass meeting at which free discus-
sion by the students was permitted.
The committee which requested the
taking of the vote recognized this.
Part of their resolution read: "Re-
solved, That a thorough and careful
discussion of the situation be stimu-
lated through the columns of The
Michigan Daily, that a mass meeting
be called at an early date for serious
discussion of the situation and what
part the University of Michigan
should play."
However, only two issues of The
Daily were available for the "thor-
ough and careful discussion" recom-
mended, and no mass meeting was
held "at an early date."
Dean Effinger said at yesterday's
meeting in Hill auditorium, "I take
it that we are met after deliberate
thought." If such was the case, why
were *e twice requested by Mr. Muzzy
not to mark our ballots until after the
meeting?
Perfect impartiality was claimed by
the men in charge of the program, be-
cause while arranging only for speak-
ers to present one side they permitted
a student to speak on the other side
of the issue. But was it just to have
one view advanced by men prepared
and the other side only by amen speak-
ing extemporaneously?
It is claimed that we must immedi-
ately install compulsory military
training because six months would be
required to train the men. If so long
is necessary why should not a few
more days have been given for dis-
cussion and a mass meeting?
President Harry B. Hutchins at the
committee meeting said, "Do not let
enthusiasm throw you off your feet.
Avoid all undue haste." And yet a
number of men prominent in the man-
agement of the balloting admitted to
me Wednesday that they believed the
voting was being done too hurriedly.
And so because time was not given
for a "thorough" discussion in The
Daily, and because a mass meeting for
discussion was not held "at an early
date," and because only one view of
the question was presented in Hill
auditorium by prepared speakers, I
claim that the spirit of the resolution
was not carried out and that an hon-
est and intelligent vote has not been
secured.
Let us value the results of the bal-
loting accordingly.
H. G. KING, '18.
WOMAN WANTS TRAINING
E. D. A. SAYS THERE ARE MANY
WHO WOULD BE WILLING TO
JOIN PREPAREDNESS MOVE
Editor, The Michigan Daily:

Now that the uestion of military
training is up be ore the University,
I wish to make a suggestion. There is
no reason on earth why women, young
unmarried women, should not be drill-
ed as well as the men, and I am sure
there are many who would be eager
for the training. Perhaps it is neces-
sary to train the men first, since they
are more useful, but let the women
have a chance, too. They ought to be
prepared as well as the men.
E. D. A.

Take your Amateur Finishing
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PETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run onX Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
in., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. M., 9:1e
p. M
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. 'a' and
arvy *"hour to 6:4 p. in.; to Lansing,
s*:4* *.**n.
Jackson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-g :48 a. m. and every two hours
o 7-:48 p. m.
Local Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. In., 6:40 a
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a. m. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6o a. .., 7:50 a
n., re:o p. m.. 12:20 a. n.
I Takes Pictures
Develops Films
makes Prints
S 13 6.and Enlarge-
ments.
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IL T Tailor
Clothes designed and made
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and Ann Sts.

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WL~omen I

wear cape and gowns to the Michigan
women's luncheon tomorrow.
Tickets to the Women's luncheon
will be on sale today at Wahr's book
store, De Fries' art store, University{
hall and the general library. They
must bepurchased by tonight.
Reading Room Not Near Completion
Library authorities have announced
that the reading room of the new
building is nowhere near completion.
It was thought, some time ago, that
the books would be moved into the
room during the spring holidays, but
this cannot be done before school is
closed in June.
Prof. . M. Wenley to Speak in Detroit
Prof. Robert M. Wenley will lec-
ture tomorrow morning at Detroit
Central high school on "The History
of Religion." -
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. tlt
Rugs perfectly cleaned, washed, and
sized without injury. Koch & Henne. ft
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

THE REGENTS AND THE
CONFERENCE
While the primacy of the military
training question rests upon the Re-
gents at their meeting today, we must
remember that another matter of su-
preme importance calls their consid-
eration.
What will they decide concerning
the return to the conference?
On Feb. 22 the board in control of
athletics voted for a resumption of
relations with the big nine by a bal-
lot of eight to one. The Regents
failed to act on this matter at their
February meeting.
Despite military training and its
significance, the conference question
demands action, if for no other reason
than the interest it aroused on the
campus and among the alumni as-
sociations, where overwhelming votes
urged a return.
What move will the board of regents
make?
There were no anarchist flags dis-
played in the student parade last even-
ing. Nor was it a tea party.
How can you best serve your coun-
try in the event of war? Take stock
of yourself now.
Wonder if that Gargoyle editorial
had any influence on the Inlander be-
ing delayed. They both have offices
in our basement.
By sticking to the sidewalks while<

for advertising and who gets the
money spent?"
The greatest problem of the day,
made still harder by horrible world
social conditions, is the problem of a
more equitable distribution of the so-
cial dividend. The advantages of sup-
plementary economic reading is that
it brings one nearer the knowledge of
production and distribution. To spread
such knowledge beyond the campus
there has recently been placed on file
in the engineering library "The New
York Journal of Commerce," an ex-
pounder of sound economic doctrine in
popular form. To prepare themselves
as propagandists of applied economics
persons would do well if they would
read that journal.
If wealth is composed of things
which have value and our greatest ac-
tivity is centered in the economic
struggle, our worthiest aim in life
should be to inform ourselves on the
process of wealth production and how
it can be distributed with economic
justice.
MICHAEL SULLIVAN.
WOMAN ENTERS PROTEST
SAYS RIGHT OF FREE SPEECH
AND THOUGHT REFUSED IN
WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
This protest is entered in behalf of
those students who are still patriotic
enough to champion the right of free
speech and thought, for which our
forefathers died. These rights were
denied Thursday morning in the wom-
en's assembly when the advocates of
compulsory military training present-
ed their side of the question, and re-
fused their opponents the -exercise of
the same right.
The committee in charge absolutely
refused to let any one speak against
military training. They said the meet-
ing was to be non-controversial, but it
was controversial with one side of the
controversy suppressed. They said the
meeting concerned only students of
the University and consequently a
woman whose husband is on the fac-
ulty could not speak in our behalf,
but another woman whose husband
is on the faculty spoke for them.
Furthermore, the committee said
there would be no discussion of the
question, and one of their speakers
argued for the '15 minutes urging
women to adopt compulsory military
training so they may learn how to sa-
lute an officer. In a monarchy such
training might be valuable, but in a
democracy there should be no use
for it.
In presenting the question one
speaker repeatedly asserted that com-
pulsory military training would in-._
volve no moral or legal obligation to
fight in case of war. How long since;
training has relieved one from obliga-
'tion. Straight through college we are

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taught that we owe our country more
because we are trained. Always it
has been maintained that the most
civilized nation owes most to the
world. The possession of wealth in-
volves the obligation to use it. Hence
the trained man is =bound to be more
liable for service than the untrained.
Public opinion would compel the
trained man to fight sooner than those
who are untrained.
RUTH E. HUSTON, 18.
MR. LYMAN L. BRYSON WILL
/ SPEAK ON "MODERN POETRY"
Mr. Lyman Bryson will read a pa-
per on "Modern Poetry" before the
English conference of the Michigan
Schoolmasters' club today.
The program for this division of the
convention has been arranged by Mr.
Frank G. Tompkins, formerly of the
rhetoric faculty of the University.
Other subjects to be discussed at the
meeting are "Producing the High
School Play" and "Examinations."
LAST TWILIGHT RECITAL OF
YEAR TO BE HELD WEDNESDAY
The last twilight recital of the year
will be presented at 4:15 o'clock on
Wednesday afternoon, April 4, in Hill
auditorium.
At this time the University ,Sym-
phony orchestra, conducted by Mr. S.
P. Lockwood, will appear, and Mr. 0.
0. Patton, tenor, will be the soloist.
This concert will be complimentary
to the public.
Oregon Girls Take/ Military Courses
Eugene, Oregon, March 29.-Military
instruction for girls =has been put in
force at the University of Oregon.
Several corps of girls have been form-
ed, which are being taught first aid,
swimming, automobile driving, me-
chanics, and drilling.
Flunk Contest for Aero Club Prize
Seattle, Wash., March 28.-Students
have failed to take part in the literary
contest beirig held at the University
of Washington by the Aero Club of
America.
Medals were to have been presented
to those writing the best themes on
aeronautics but no one entered the
contest.
"WID" SAYS-
Moving picture experts swear by
"Wid's" decidedly honest criticisms.
Here is what "Wid" says about "The
Price She Paid," with Clara Kimball
Young: "Certainly this is the best
production in which Clara Kimball
Young has ever appeared.' Arcade
next Monday and Tuesday.-Adv.

ls' Glee club will rehearse at 5'
k this afternoon in Sarah Cas-
Angell hall.
men wishing employment during
g vacation should see Dean Myra
rdan.
kets for the Junior Girls' play
>e on sale from 9 to 12 o'clock and
1 to 3 o'clock today in the Lib-
e senior girls are requested to

URGES ECONOMIC READING,
WANTS ALL TO BE INFORMED OF]
PROCESS OF WEALTH PRODUC-
TION AND HOW DISTRIBUTED
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
To the woman at the cupboard, the
man in the street, and the ultimate
consumer, the foremost motives to
urgent ends is the science which has
for its object "The study of mankind
in the ordinary business of life's
economics." Take the one item of the
economic waste of advertising. To
apply the laboratory method for every
dollar spent on the campus, $1.70 is
spent for publicity. The sons and
daughters of advertising tradesmen
might well ask the question, "What
doth it profit papa for the money paid

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