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March 27, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-27

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t

THE WEATHER
COLDER; POBABLY
F Ali1

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UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

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No. 12i.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 1917.

PRICFI~ PVE 4"ET'

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SPRING FOOTBALL
PRACTICE BEGINS
THIS AFTERNOON
CAPTAIN SMIT ISSUES CALL FOR
ALL CANiDIDATES TO
REPORT
YOST HERE IN APRIL
TO SUPERVISE WORK
Will Take Charge of Squad Aided by
Assistant Coach
Pontius
Captain Smith of the 1917 Varsity
eleven, announced yesterday that the
annual spring practice would start at
3:15 o'clock today on Ferry field.
Every man in the University who
has any ambition to play on a Michi-
gan Varsity football team is urged
personally by the captain to come out
and begin training immediately. With
only 39 men who have had experi-
ence in Michigan football on the regu-
lar roster of available material, the
chanCes for landing a berth on the
next team are exceptionally good and
every Michigan man who can play
football is urged to report today.
Coach Yost and Assistant Coach
Pontius will take charge of the squad
immediately following spring vaca-
tion. In the meantime Captain Smith
will have charge, while Mac McGinnis
and Buzz Catlett will assist in train-
ing the candidates.
The Varsity leader stated that those
men who came out after the first call
and who worked during the two weeks
before vacation would be given spe-
cial consideration and will have the
advantage over those who await
Coach Yost's arrival before doing any
work.
Conference teams have been work-
ing for the last three weeks, while
eastern institutions such as Cornell,
Princeton, and Yale have been out
two weeks. Nearly all of these uni-
versities have had from 50 to 85 men
out on the first day, while the best
that Michigan boasted last year on any
day was about 45, and only a few more
than a dozen reported on the first day.
It is hoped by those in charge that
this record will not recur this year.
Equipment may be obtained after
3:15 o'clock at the clubhouse on Ferry
field this afternoon. Regular work
will be started at once, with two
squads to practice on alternate days.
FRESH MANDOLIN CLUB HOLD
MEETING THURSDAY EVENING
The net meeting of the Freshman,
Mandolin club will be held on Thurs-
day night instead of on Wednesday.
The club has been recently organ-
ized and h1arry Sunley elected man-
ager and G. Carrington Dinwiddie, li-
brarian.
On account of the rules regarding
freshman activities, the club will give
no concerts except at class functions£
but will confine their efforts to train-
ing themselves for the Varsity club.
Raymond H. St.Clair, '17, is the or-
ganizer of the club.
MARINE ENGINEERS AND NAVAL
ARCHITECTS OFFER SERVICESt
A letter has been sent by Prof. Her-
bert C. Sadler of the naval architecture
and marine engineering department
to the United States navy department
stating that he and the 12 men ofI
the senior class in marine engineer-t

ing will be available, if needed, fort
work in the government ship yards.
If the offer is accepted the men will
probably be used for work on the1
plans for the new naval craft which
the government is planning to build.,

Osborne Tells of
League in Prison
Reformed Prisoner Relates Experi.
ences in Unreformed Prisons
and Urges Change
Thomas Mott Osborne, famed as th
"golden rule warden" of Sing Sing
spoke on "Common Sense in Prison
Management" in the Methodist church
Sunday evening.
During his address Mr. Osborne out
lined the work of the Mutual Welfare
league made up of prisoners in Sing
Sing prison and the efficient work i
is doing in preparing men in the pris
ons to "go straight" when they leave
the penitentiary.
Mr. Osborne spoke of Michigan as a
"civilized state" because it had no
criminal grand juries nor capital pun-
ishment. His lecture was supple-
mented by a talk from a young man
who had been reformed by Mr. Os-
borne, and who told of the bad con-
ditions in the prisons and of the good
which the league was accomplishing.
MARINE CORPS TO GET
1,400 TOTALIT ONCE
PRESIDENT URGES NEWSPAPERS
TO AROUSE INTEREST IN
RECRUITING
Washington, March 26.- President
Wilson, in an executive order late to-
day, authorized the immediate in-
crease of the United States marine
corps to 17,400. Accompanying the
authoriziation the president issued an
appeal to the press of the country to
awaken interest in recruiting, and de-
clared that "over 4,000 more men are
needed in the marine corps, and need-
ed now." The present strength of
the marine corps is 14,981 men and
596 officers. The appeal issued with
the executive order read:
"The president has signed an ex-
ecutive order directing that the au-
thorized strength of the marine corps
be increased to 17,400 men. He was
authorized by congress in case of em-
ergency to direct such increase in en-
listment. The United States marine
corps is the soldier's branch of our
'first line of defense.'
"Marines serve boats ashore and
afloat, and are trained as infantry,
heavy and light artillery, and machine
gun companies. They form the land-
ing parties from ships of the navy,
and are the first men detailed for ex
peditionary duty. Tbey defend all
naval bases. Each capital ship of the
navy carries one company of marines.
"The marine corps offers exception-
al opportunities to young men of grit
and ambition to serve their country in
the first line of defense."
Professor Magoffin to Speak on Rome
Prof. Ralph V. D. Magoffin, '02, now
of Johns Hopkins university, will give
a course of four lectures in Ann Ar-
bor during this week.
At 11 o'clock this morning in the
smallVlecture room of Alumni Me-
morial hall, Professor Magoffin will
deliver a lecture with illustrated stere-
opticon slides on "Rome as Mistress
of the World." This afternoon at 4:15
o'clock pictures of contemporary ar-
tists on the subject of "Roman Life
and Death" will be shown in the upper
hall of Alumni Memorial hall.
Aristolochites to Initiate Tonight
The Aristolochites, an honory phar-
macy socity, will hold their initiation
at 6:45 o'clock tonight. Election into

this society is based on scholarship,
the initiates generally being recom-
mended by the faculty. -
Seven neophytes are to be initiated:
E. H. Wirth, '18P, Alfred Black, '18P,
G. R. Byrnes, '17P, H. B. McWilliams,
18P, W. E.Kirchgessner, '19P, R. B.
Fast, '19P, and F. E. Marsh, '17P.
Yoelker Speaks Before Tryads Tonight
Charles M. Voelker of the Voelker-
Schorfemberg company of Detroit, will
lecture on advertising art in room 162
Natural Science building tonight at
7:30 o'clock, speaking under the au-
spices of the Tryads.
The lecture was planned for mem-
bers of the student body 'that expect
to enter the field of advertising art,
but is open to the public.

PREDICTS ABRUPT
WIAR DECLARATION
House Foreign Affairs Committeeman
Expects Congress to Waste
Little Time

HOLD FIRST CLASS
IN CHINESE TODAY

Free

Instruction to Be
Chinese Students'
Club

Given by

BEGIN SERIES OF MEETINGS
CONCERNING NATIONAL DEFENS
e Plan to Cover Espionage Legislation,
Newspaper Censorship and
t Other Affairs
e Washington, March 26.-No fur-
ther national guard mobilization
a is under contemplation for the Im-
mediate future, Secretary of War
Baker announced this afternoon.
Washington March 26.-Representa-
tive Harrison of the house foreign af-
fairs committee, who held a confer-
ence with Secretary of State Lansing,
Chairman Flood, and Representative
Ragsdale today, believes congress will
pass a flat declaration of war against
Germany.
The meeting was the first of a series
of "national defense conferences" held
at the call of the house foreign affairs
committee, and the secretary of war.
It is understood the conference cov-
ered in a general way espionage leg-
islation, newspaper censorship, and
the form of the resolution which con-
gress is expected to pass declaring
a state of war exists with Germany.
Because the extraordinary session
will find little on the statute books
which deals with the situation, admin-
istration heads and leaders in con-
gress are being impressed with the
necessity for speed on the work.
There must be provisions for deten-
tion of suspected enemies of the re-
public, rigid laws governing citizens
of Teutonic powers, punishment of
spies, protection, and the necessity for
perhaps billions of dollars in cash.
In connection with defense legisla-
tion the counsel of national defense
announced today it would convene its
advisory board on April 2 to be ready
with the vast amount of data it has
collected.
INLANDER DELAYED
Magazine to Appear Tomorrow with
Poems, Essays, Sketches and
Campus Comment
Owing to an unavoidable delay, the'
March number of the Inlander will
not appear until noon tomorrow. Dif-
ficulties have beset the publication of
the present issue, but members of the
staff promise that the result will
amply reward readers of the maga-
zine for the tardines of its appearance.
The issue is devoted to essays,
sketches, and poems for the most
part, and in the editorials is comment
on campus affairs.
JUDGE LANE SAYS LAW HAS
OPENING FOR HUMANITARIAN
"If you want to help mankind, then
law has an opening for you," said
Judge Victor H. Lane Sunday night in
his lecture on "Law as a Profession"
at Lane hall.
"Law offers an opportunity to make
ones self felt," said the speaker. "In
fact there is probably no other body
of men of equal numbers whose in-
fluence has been equaled or who have
so controlled public opinion in the
history of our country as the bar."
The last of a series of lectures on
the professions will be given by Prof.
. Leo Sharfman next Sunday night
on the subject, "Business as a Pro-
fession."
BOTANICAL JOURNAL CLUB TO
HOLD MEETING THIS EVENING
Prof. H.'H. Bartlett and W. J. Broth-
erton, grad., will be the princip1al
speakers at the meeting of the Bot-

anical Journal club to be held tonight
at 7:30 o'clock in room 173 Natural
Science building. Other brief reports
will be given by members of the club.-
Gen. Wood Takes Transfer Laconically
New York, March 26.-"I am a sol-
dier, and I go where I am sent," was
the only comment Major General Leon-
ard Wood made today on his transfer
from the command of the department
of the East to the department of the
Southeast.

The initial meeting of the class in
Chinese will be held at 7 o'clock this
evening in the Cosmopolitan club
rooms in University hall. The course
will be in charge of the Chinese Stu-
dents' club and will be taught by F.
C. Liu, '18.
There will be two one-hour recita-
tions each week at 7 o'clock on Tues-
day and Friday evenings. The course
will be an elementary one and all per-
sons interested in the Chinese lan-
guage are urged to enroll at once.
The lessions will be given free.
INTEREST GROWING IN
MUiCiPAL EXHIBITS

ISTEPS TAKEN BY COMBINED ASSEMBLY
TO PLACE MICHIGAN IN POSITIODN TO
AID COUNTRY IN PREPARING FOR, wAI
PlWSIDEVNT HUTCHNS AND DEANS OF COLLEGES CALL UPON STU-
DENTS TO CONSIDER SOME PLAN OF IMMEDIATE
ACTION
COUNCIL WILL HOLD CAMPUS VOTE ON QUESTION THURSDAI
Action of Other Colleges ani Universities Throughout the Country In Ad-
opting Compulsor Training Act as Welding Power for
Au. cates of Defense

ANN ARBOR DEMONSTRATION
CITY ACTIVITIES HELD
THIS WEEK

OF

The municipal exhibit that is being
held in the city hall this week will
no doubt be the forerunner of city
municipal exhibits in the state and in
the country, as the local exhibit is one
of the first of its kind to be given,
and reports from a number of Michi-
gan towns reveal the fact that the
movement is being taken up through-
out the state.
Every city office will be open to the
public and city officials will be pres-
ent to answer any questions about how
the city government is carried on.
Every department and nearly every
industry of the city will have some
form of representation at the exhibit.
The work of the children in man-
ual training has been classified ac-
cording to grades.
A model of the proposed new Broad-
way bridge has been set up. The ap-
propriation for the new bridge will be
voted on at the spring election, April
2.. The idea of the whole exhibit is to
show exactly what is being done with
the taxes that are being paid into the
city funds and what the functions of
the various departments of the city
are.
MEMBERS SHOULD REGISTER
EARLY FOR SCIENCE MEETING
Members of the Michigan Academy
of Science are urged to register at the
office of the secretary in room Z-231
Natural Science building as soon as
possible. Nominations for member-
ship should be turned in early in the
session.
The social program of the academy
during its session in Ann Arbor will
consist of a smoker given at 9 o'clock
Wednesday evening in Alumni Me-
morial hall by the Research club; a
luncheon for biologists at noon on Fri-
day in room B-100 Natural Science
building, and an informal dinner at 6
o'clock on Friday at the Michigan
Union for the political economists.
BERLIN REPORTS FOOD RIOTS
IN MIDDLE SECTIONS OF ITALY
Berlin, March 26.-The official Ger-
man press bureau today issued the
following statement regarding riots in
Italy:
"Vienna newspapers report fromi
Italy that a furious riot occurred, noti
only in Milan, but in other towns in
the upper and middle sections of Italy.
There have been disorders almost
everywhere caused by starvation.
"Also, there have been manifestoes1
against war and in favor of peace. In
numerous places soldiers were forced
to interfere."
School Superintendents Leave Tonight
With the end of the session at 7:30;
o'clock tonight in the Natural Science
lecture room, the Michigan Association
of Superintendents and School Boards1
will leave Ann Arbor to make way for1
the Classical institute conference, thec
short term state institute, and the
Academy of Science meeting. Thec
time and place of all lectures will be
found under the What's Going on Col-c
umn.c
German Attacks Repulsed at Postavy
Petrograd, March 26.-An attempt3
by German forces in the region of
Postavy to advance a'fter four suc-
cessive gas attacks was repulsed byr
Russian forces. The enemy was thrownf
back.

I

Resoluns of Committee
Whereas, the United States is at the present time confronted
with a very serious crisis, and
Whereas, we believe that the part played by the colleges and uni-
versities is of vital importance to the country in preparing for war,
and
Whereas, we believe that the University of Michigan should co
operate with the other universities of the country who have already
taken steps in placing their resources at the disposal of the national
government,
Be it therefore resolved: That military, training as provided in
general war orders No. 49 be put into effect at .Michigan as soon as
possible and that the Regents of the University make such drill com-
pulsory on the freshman and sophomores of the literary and engi-
neering schools, such training to be optional with upperclassmen of
all departments.
That the Student council of the University of Michigan shall on
Thursday, March 29, 1917, conduct an all-campus vote from 8 o'clock
to 6 o'clock to determine whether Michigan students favor the adop-
tion of compulsory drill for freshmen and sophomores in the literary
and engineering colleges, such training to be optional with upperclass-
men of all departments, and
That the University of Michigan Union be empowered, in co-opera-
tin with the University, to secure definite information in regard to
all resources of the University, including the various services which'
ihe faculty, students and alumni of this institution could render in
ease of war, in order to have sash information available "for the na-
tional government, and
That a mass meeting of faculty and students be called at an early
date for a serious and dispassionate discussion of ,the situation, and
what part the University of Michigan could play in the impending
conflict, and
That a thorough and careful discussion of the situation be stimu-
lated through the columns of The -Michigan Daily.

Studi
Undi
Students
Than1

, s to 77 -ain Michigan will take immediate sty
to aid the federal government in p
er War Order paring for wr

No More Subject to Call
Citizens Not Enrolled in
Military Drill

Under general orders No. 49 under1
the act of June 3, 1916, the United
States war department is enabled to
organize, train, and maintain a reserve
officers' training corps composed of
one or more units in all civil educa-
tional institutions, without expense
to the students, but under the direct
supervision of the secretary of war,
with all uniforms, arms, equipment
and detailed officers furnished by the
war department. The principal pro-
visions of order No. 49 are in brief as
follows:
The object of the training corps is
to train men efficiently with the least
practical interference in their civil
occupation.
The corps shall consist of units es-
tablished by the presidents of such in-
stitutions as apply for membership,
but must be under the regulations pre-
scribed by the secretary of war.
Organization shall be in two divis-
ions. A senior corps in such uni-
versities requiring four years of col-
legiate work toward a degree, and a
junior division in all other institu-
tions.
Eligibility requires all applicants to
be able-bodied men, citizens of the
United States and not under 14 years
of age.
Direct control shall be in the hands
of the war department but the uni-
versity authorities "will retain their
oridinary powers of supervision and
control."
Uniforms, arms, and equipments
will be furnished by the war depart-
ment without expense to the student.
Students in the corps Are no more
subject to call into active service than
citizens not in training. At the-end of
four years they may be commissioned
into second lieutenants.

At a meeting of an emergency com-
mittee held last night, and composed
of the president of the University, the
deans, the heads of the various cam-
pus organizations, and the entire Stu-
dent council, resolutions were adopted
leading to the co-operation of the
University of Michigan with other uni-
versities throughout the country in
placing all their available resources
at the disposal of the government. .
A set of resolutions drawn up and
presented to the committee by Glenn
M. Coulter, '16-'18L, president of the
Michigan Union; A. S. Hart, '17, presi-
dent of the Student council, and John
C. B. Parker, '17, managing editor of
The Daily, providing that a student
vote be taken upon the question of
adopting compulsory military training
under war orders 49, that a mass meet-
ing be held, and that the Michigan
Union be empowered to take definite
steps to catalogue the resources of the
University for government use, was
passed almost unanimously by the
committee.
After a short introductory talk by
President Hart of the Student council,
President Hutchins took charge of the
meeting.
Time to Prepare for the Worst
"It is the duty of every student to
take stock of himself and discover in
what capacity he is best fitted to serve
his country in the event of war," said
the president. "I am confident that
every Michigan man will do his duty,"
he continued. "It is time that we
should prepare for the worst and con-
sider the matter in a most serious
light. Don't let enthusiasm throw you
off your feet. Avoid all undue haste
and excitement, but remember that
Michigan men have always done their
duty in the past," he said in con-
clusion.
Dean Vaughan Speaks
Dean Vaughan spoke first for the
faculty. "I hope that'the students
will ask for immediate compulsory
(Continued on Page Six.)

Adelphi to Discuss Pece After War
Projects for permanent peace after
the war will be discussed at tonight's
meeting of the Adelphi house of rep-
resentatives. The talks will center
about a resolution introduced advo-
cating a league to enforce peace, with
Republican and Democratic repre-
sentatives upholding their respective
sides of the argument.
A report of the committee in charge
of the collection of funds for the re-
decorating of the -Adeiphi rooms has
been prepared and the actual work of
refurnishing will probably be done
during the present semester, accord-
ing to those in charge of the fund.

Engineering Directories on Sale
Sophomore class directories will be
on sale at the class assembly Thurs-
day for 15 cents.

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