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March 25, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE Ml

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THEM H [

kTRIOTIC SUPPORT
QED CROSS SOCIETY
UNT AND UNIVERSITY
S EXPRESS APPROVAL
OF ORGAMIZATION

Since the European war the Na-
onal Red Cross society has proved
te most effective organization to al-
viate the suffering of the wounded
; the front. As this nation is rapidly
;proaching a war, the American
ational Red Cross is exerting every,
iluence to complete its organization
r immediate service.
President Wilson, ex-Presidents
aft, and Roosevelt, President Harry
Hutchins of the University and
eans Bates, Cooley, Effinger, Hins-
ale, Lloyd, Vaughan, and Ward have
.1 expressed their approval and com-
.ented favorably on the work of the
ed Cross and what it stands for.
Patriotic and Humne-Wilson
President Wilson says: "A large,
ell organized, and efficient Red Cross
-essential. It is both a patriotic
ad humane service that is rendered
y every citizen who becomes a mem-
er of the American Red Cross."
Taft Commends Plan
Ex-President Taft said: "I hereby
>mmend the plan of our Red Cross
secure a large membership in this
>untry. I hope the American peo-
le will prove as patriotic in this re-
pect as are the people of other na-
ons, so that we may be as well pre-
ared as they to render relief in the
isfortune of war or to mitigate the
ifferings caused by pestilence, fam-
te, fire, floods, mine explosions, and
her great disasters."
All Should Aid-Roosevelt
Ex-President Roosevelt has said:
I hope that all of the patriotic and
umane men, women, and children of
ie United States, who are able to do
>, will give it (the Red Cross), their
apport by becoming members of our
ational organization."
President Hutchins Approves
"I need not say that I am heart
id soul with the Red Cross move-
.ent and that I am delighted to know
at extensive and effective work by
e Ann Arbor chapter is being
lanned. Its efforts should meet with
ie hearty and enthusiastic approval
our citizens.-H. B. Hutchins."
Dean Cooley in Favor
"Considering what the Red Cross
as done, and is doing, both in peace
nd war, and that it is a work which
tose at home can do for those who
re fighting for them at the front, it
ould seem that the opportunity to
in was all that should be necessary.
he fact that in war it is a recognized
art of the machinery of combat will
ake every member of the Red Cross
el that he or she is doing something
help. The only wars that; can be
on to stay won are those in which
e family joins, fathers, sons, broth-
s, and husbands to engage the
Lemy, mothers, daughters, sisters
id wives to back them up.-M. E.
>olev."

ditional arm of defense and so makes
its appeal to patriotism as well as to
philanthropy.-Alfred H. Lloyd."
All Should Unite-Dean Vaughan
"The Red Cross is a humanitarian
movement. It had its birth in the
brain of Henri Dunant, who was deep-
ly impressed by the suffering of the
wounded on the battlefield of Solforipo
in 1859. Dunant gave his fortune, his
time and his energy to this great
work, and finally succeeded in the
Geneva conference in 1863 in induc-
ing the great nations of the world- to
provide for humane treatment of the
wounded on battlefields. The activ-
ities of the Red Cross, however, are
not confined to war, and concern
themselves with pestilences, famine,
disaster, wherever these overwhelm
mankind. Work done by the Red
Cross is an evidence of the existence
of the high spirit of humanity. Its
aims are to instruct us in the intel-
ligent care of suffering man. All
should unite under its colors and
strive to fit themselves for any duty
for which they may be called.-V. C.
Vaughan."

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AT THE THEATERS

# f S * "I I S# *4# # *

TODAY
Majestic-Lois Meredith In
at Auction."
Orpheum-Marie Doro in
and Won." Also Holmes
els.

"Sold *
*

"Lost
traT-

Rae-"The Rights of
Mr. Jack comedy.
MONDAY'
Majestic-Vaudeville.

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Man." Also

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Silber and North have an act en-
titled "Bashfoolery." The Ross broth-
ers, champion hair weight boxers, will
present an offering called "A Day in
a Gymnasium."
Lambert Defeats
Loucks in JMinute
Michigan's heavyweight wrestling
championship .was won yesterday aft-
ernoon by Lambert, when he threw
Loucks in less than a minute.
The first bout of the day was the
semifinals in the middleweight divis-
ion, but this had to be postponed be-
cause of a dislocated elbow which
Crane received in the first minute of
the match. Planck, last year's run-
nerup was Crane's opponent.
The semifinals of the lightweight

class was won by Troub, champion
two years ago, from Howard, one of
the lightest men entered. The latter
put up a game scrap for five minutes
but was finally downed.
The bouts were held after the con-
clusion of the championship game of
the interscholastic basketball tourna-
mnent, a large crowd staying to see the
grappling.
Utah's Legislature Miserly in Grants
Salt Lake City, Utah, March 24.-
Utah's expectations for new buildings
have been disappointed by the state
legislature's act in cutting appropria-
tions. The university is to be allowed
less than $45,000 for the next two
years.

SCORES a n d
SHEET MUSIC

from

Arcade-Emmy Wehlem
ity." Also a Christie

in "Van-
comedy.

Orpheum?--arie Doro in "Lost *
and Won." Also Holmes travels. *
Rae--Hobort Bosworth in "Buck- *
shot John." Also Hearst news. *
*

Do your
repairing?
Co-Adv.

shades need renewing, or
Call 237. C. H. Major &
F-eod

POP. MAT.
WED.
BEST SEATS $z

GARRICK
DETROIT

WEEK
MARCH 26
NIGHTS
50C tO $2.00

Dean Ward Hopeful
"I am sincerely hopeful that the
people of this vicinity will not be re-
luctant to assume their share of the
present obligations of the Red Cross
occasioned by the greatest of calam-
ities. They have shown a fine spirit
toward such things before, and I have
confidence in their doing so now.-
Marcus L. Ward."
Briberg Wins 2 Straight from George
Another whole match has been play-
ed in the handball tournament. Bri-
berg beat George two straight games,
15 to 8 and 15 to 7. O'Connell with-
drew giving the match to Reilly. This
now makes four games finished in the
singles and two in the doubles.
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. tf

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
AT THE MAJESTIC
The feature of today's bill will be
Lois Meredith in "Sold at Auction."
Miss Meredith was formerly star in
. Peg O' My Heart," "Help Wanted,"
and "Everywoman." In the support-
ing cast are William Conklin, Frank
Mayo, and others. Max Linder will be
shown in a comedy film, and also in
an athletic carnival.
Monday
The opening bill at the Majestic
Monday is the Colour Gems, an act
in which living models portray famous
works of art on an elevated stage.
Sherman, Van, and Hyman give a
musical and comedy act. Madame
Marion portrays seven characters in
seven different dialects. The act is
a detective sketch.

THE MESSRS. SHUBERT Present

Fg
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7L
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ANNA HELD
In

FOLLOW ME

In the most regally gowned, opulently staged musical comedy ever
senit on tour.
Enormously clever cast of 'New York Casino favorites and
60 Anna Held girls.
Sylvia Jason, Louise Mink, Charles 131. Haughton, Edith Day, P. Paul
Porcasi, The Sykes Sisters, Wilmer Bently, Seabury and Shaw and

THE "NONSENSICAL NUT"
HENRY LEIS

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YOUR EYES
are valuable to you in proportion to your ability to use them to the
best advantage. Put the responsibility up to us and you will have full
eye efficiency.
We are experts in "Drugless" eye measurements-(by the way
ask the reason for drugs in fitting glasses) and the fitting and making
of comfort glasses.
The best service in the city.
EMIL H. ARNOLD
OPTOMETRIST-OPTICIAN
With ARNOLD AND CO. 220 S. MAIN ST.

I

Fashion Slaves should not fail to see the advanced styles which
adorn the Earth's most beautiful girls robed in the world's most mag.
nificent dresses.
THIS WEEK, "1S115MAJESTY, BUNKER BEAN"

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B ,uy

P
A
R
A

Chuck

S

~~000010[

OM LE

FIFTEEN CLOTHES
I want{ you to just look at what the
town's snappiest dressers are buying at
may shop for

All Must Support--Dean Bates
"The Red Cross society, by many
years of conspicuous service to the
nation and to humanity, has proved
its right to the approval and sup-
port of us all, at all times. Now in
the time of the nation's crisis it is
peculiarly well qualified and equipped
to undertake the work of relief, for
which unfortunately we are likely
soon to have urgent need. The local
branch is in loyal and efficient hands,
and we must all give it our sympa-
thetic and active support here and
now.-Henry M. bates."
Appeal Is Wide-Dean Effinger
"In sincerely hope that the effort
to organize an active branch of the
American Red Cross society will meet
with hearty response from students
and faculty, as well as from the citi-
zens of Ann Arbor. The annual' mem-
bership fee is so slight and the work
done by the organization makes so
wide an appeal that there should be
no hesitation. Especially in a com-
munity like Ann Arbor should the
Red Cross society receive generous
support.-John R. Effinger."
Dean Iiinsdale Praises Aims
"The humanitarian aims of the Red
Cross ought to appeal to every per-
son who has at heart the good of his
fellow men, or has any degree of
patriotism at this time when the pub-
lic is agitated about and quite liable
to be engaged in military activities.
This noble and nation-wide movement
will be one of the most valuable
agencies for making more comfort-
able, or relieving the discomfort of
those who may be exposed to the
dangers incident to military experi-
ence.-W. B. Hinsdale."
Arm of Defense-Dean Lloyd
"Of course I approve of the Red
Cross and of Ann Arbor taking her
full part. Aside from the common
humanity of it, for which no word
need be said, the Red Cross is an ad-

1857-Dry Goods, Furniture and Women's Fashions-1917

$15

One Price That
SAVES U-
$10

I

INTRODUCING TREO

GIRDLES FOR ATHLETIC

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,I

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YOUNG WOMEN

Suits, Top Coats

S
E

Made of cool, light weight elastic webbing with only sufficient
boning to support the fabric. A Treo Girdle provides the proper
foundation for Spring and Summer garments, and permits perfect
freedom for dancing riding, walking and athletics.

Here $15 Buy's
$25 Values

Chuck's
CLOTHES SHOP

lu~

PRICES
$2.25 for the 12 inch leng
$3.00 for the 14 inch leng
$3.50 for the 16 inch le'ng

An H. & W. light elastic girdle, 12 inches b
for as little as $1.50.

th
th
th
ong, can be obtained
OOR)

11

i

618 E. LIBERTY

i

Now On Sale'

II.

(COR
~ i

.SET SHOP-SECOND FL(

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ati

1h-

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, ..
. .

i25 Couples

A

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Friday, March 30

lfunic ?auii
Mrs. M. M. Root
601 E. William St.

at

Tickets at

Dancing 9-1

r-

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