100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 22, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HE WEATHER
AIER AD SHIFT-

I

j ~r #31kian at

UNITED F
DAY AND) N
WIRE S ER,

t

I-

JGITT
VICE

., .

VOL. XXVII. No. 21.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN.

THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1917.

PRICE FIVE C

I

amm

I

. ____ _

LIFE AND PATHOS
WITH ODD SCENES
MARK OPERA HIT
FIRST NIGHT PRODUCTION IS
GREN ITH SMOOTH PRE-
SENTATION
STORY IS PLEA FOR
DEMOCRATIC SPIRIT
Subtle Satire Grasped by Audience;
Songs Given Repeated Calls
for Encore
Signalized by its blended humor
and pathos, by its quaint allegorical
setting, and by a smoothness unusual
in a first night production, the "Fools'
Paradise," Michigan's 1917 opera, last
night received the entire approval of
the audience that crowded the Whit-
ney theater.
The story itself was simple, but
contained a vein of subtle satire and
a plea for broad-mindedness and de-
mocracy at Michigan, by no means
lost upon the spectators. From the
rise of the first curtain to the last note
of the finale, it was evident that the
wrk of E. E. Pardee, '17, was far
above the average annual opera. No
quip in the dialogue passed unnoticed
by the audience. No song was allowed
to go without repeated calls for an
encore.
W. V. Casgrain, '18, as Tontagini,
spirit of Michigan, appeared in the
significant' prologue to ask the King
of Fools that Folly be sent to Michi-
gan that in his magic mirror they
might see the error of their ways.
The King himself resolves to go, and
from time to time appears in the
ensuing scenes where narrowness of
view and selfishness runs rife. It is
this that disturbs the love affair of
Dick and Daisy and prevents a happy
culmination at the start.
Roles Well Played
R. J. McCaughey, '19, as Dick, played
his role in admirable fashion, while
the audience promptly fell in love
with F. J. Wurster's Daisy at her first
entrance. The high-brow type of
"co-ed," and her opposite, the girl who
"came to Michigan for a man," 'al-
lowed C. W. Clark, '18, and L. J.
Donahue, '19, the opportunity for some
clever bits of satire. Strains of com-
edy weie ably furnished by Tubby, the
would-be athlete; by Hiram, the frosh;
by Professor Bookery, and by the
negro maid and porter. H. W. Gold-
stick, '17D, as Sherman, the porter,
.deserves special commendation, for
the part, though not difficult, is easily
overplayed. E. E. Hawkes, '17, in the
character of Daisy's father and Dick's
guardian, portrayed the returned
alumnus in pleasing fashion.
Songs Effective
Poignant epigrams and allusions to
local conditions won applause, but it
was the songs that drew forth the full
appreciation of the spectators. The
"Evening Song" of C. S. Lawton, '18E,
which occurs .in the first act, with the
library chimes sounding solemn and
slow, with the lowered lights and the
moon-faced clock in the tower, con-
tained a depth of sentiment which
will make the scene linger long in
the memory. "My Fairy Princess,"
and "If I Had an Army of Men" are
to be 'ranked as valuable acquisitions
to Michigan music. Act two contained
"Winter Bells" and "In Spite of All,"
the first merry with its suggestions
of tingling cold and swift gliding over

smooth ice; the second, tender and ap-
pealing.,
With the first wonder caused by
the richness of elaborate costuming
comes the wave of surprise at the evo-
lutions of the chorus moving through
the intricate figures with a grace and
ease that only faintly hints at the
many drills and rehearsals spent upon
their working out. With almost no
exception, the voices of the principals
were excellent, while Carlos Zanelli,
(Continued on Page Six.)

Plan to Commandeer Shipping;
Not to Injure Over-Sea Trade
Washington, March 21.-Plans to commandeer shipping have been
made by the navy department and the federal shipping board.
This was made known in the following announcement: "Chair-
man Denman of the shipping board states that, while he cannot give
accurate details of the naval program for commandeering merchant
tonnage, he can assure the shipping public that the program is not
extensive and will create no considerable disturbance in oversea
commerce. It is not in the minds of the navy department at the pres-
ent time to commandeer any vessels engaged in the carrying of gen-
eral cargoes to foreign countries."

AD0lCES FROM GERMAN FOREIGN OFFICE WARN U.L S
BE A STATE OF WAR, NOT A DECLARATIOllN, IS OPINI

OPERA TO GIVE PRIZES
FOR BOOKSAND MUSIC
UNION DIRECTORS DECIDE TO
STIMULATE INTEREST
IN PLAYS
Instituting a new phase in the his-
tory of Michigan's operas the board
of directors of the Union decided yes-
terday to award a prize of $20 to the
writer, or writers, of the winning
scenario, $50 to the author of the se-
lected book, and $50 to the composers
of the music.
Given by the Union in order to
stimulate greater interest in the writ-
ing of the plays,.and to aid the Mimes,
the prizes will be apportioned by a
committee composed of the general
chairman of the opera, the musical di-
rectiyr, and tihe president of the
Union, among the competing men in
proportion to the work each has done.
The new rule holds for this year, the
writers of "Fools' Paradise" receiving
the benefit of it.
Adopts Resolution
In a formal resolution the Union
expressetl its gratitude to the Y.. M.
C. A. for the use of Lane hall for the
rehearsals of the cast and chorus.
The Senate council and the com-
mittee on student affairs extended to
the Union the explicit authority to
conduct in the future all special trains
at the time of football games, track
meets, or vacations. These trains will
be operated at cost, thereby saving
the traveling body a profit which
formerly went to private promoters.
To Give Football Banquets
The committee on student affairs
decided to place the "Spotlight Vaude-
ville" upon the calender of University
events for the coming year. Approv-
ing the action taken by the board, the
committee provided for a general foot-
ball- dinner to take the place of the
smokers of previous years. The ban-
quet will be served by the collegiate
alumni in Waterman gymnasium at
cost. In the past football dinners at
the end of the season have proved suc-
cessful, as many as 1,200 attending.
The change was deemed necessary as
the gymnasium is not longer avail-
able for smokers, and the coliseum
proved unsatisfactory last fall.
In conclusion, a committee of three
were appointed to investigate the ad-
visability of engaging the services of
a man to conduct the social activities

MILITARY CORPS GAI NS
FULL BATTALION FORCE

NEW COMPANY FORMED BY
"ROOKIES" PRESENT LAST
NIGHT

75

Michigan now has a full battalion of
voluntary military drillers. Last'
night's attendance at the regular
weekly drill totaled 175, the largest
number yet recorded.
The number of "rookies" signed up
last night was approximately 75. The
attendance would have exceeded 200
if the entire quota of "regulars" had
appeared. As a result of the increased;
number of fourth company was or-
ganied. This will be known as Com-
pany D. Major Wilson said last night
that he expects enough new men next
-Wednesday to form a fifth company.
The officers of the new company
are: Captain, Louis F. Dieterich, and
first lieutenant, Harry E. Montelius,
'18E. The officers of the next com-
pany to be formed will be selected
next Wednesday. Nearly 20 officers
from the faculty and student body,
who helped to drill volunteers last
spring reported tonight and will help
with the new movement.
Organize Officers' School
A school for officers was organized
last night and will have regular meet-
ings once each week on some night
other than Wednesday. The object
o the school will be to train the men
in branches of military science with
which they are not familiar. These
men are to apply for commissions in
the officers' reserve corps.
Last night's drill included instruc-
tion in the use of the rifle, and close
and extended order drills. During the
course of the drill the men were ad-
dressed by Major Verneau, a retired
officer of the regular army, and by
Colonel Pack, a retired major of in-
fantry in the 31st regiment of the
Michigan national guard, who was on
the Mexican border during the entire
time the Michigan troops were on
duty.
Retired Officers Address Men
Major Verneau discussed the mat-
ter of military discipline. , Colonel
Pack told the men about border duty
and his experiences this summer.
They expressed their appreciation of
the efforts the students are making

POSTPONE DATE OF
OPENING SHIP BIDS
Navy Department Orders Additional
Destroyers; To 'Co-ordinate
Air Services
Washington, March 21.-Secretary
of the Navy Daniels late today di-
rected that the date for opening all
bids on the 15 new destroyers be ad-
vanced 11 days to April 4, from March
24. The department announced also
that it would at once order additional
destroyers under the $115,000,000
naval emergency fund which Presi-
dent Wilson has liberated for use.
The shipyards were notified to send
representatives at once to Washington
to confer on the matter with naval
experts.
Immediately following Daniel's an-
nouncement a report from a joint
board of army and navy officers rec-
ommended the immediate co-ordina-
tion of the military and naval aero-
nautic services for maximum national
advantage in war. The report urged
also that aeronautic pilots and observ-
ers be trained together in joint sta-
tions near- the coast. Co-ordination
of the services, the board said, should
include a general standardization of
machines and motors.
The naval air service in time of war
would be charged with operations in
connection with the fleet oversea,
scouting for shore bases, and for pro-
tection of naval 'reserves. The army
section would be charged with the de-
fense of cities, fortifications, arsenals,
navy yards, shipbuilding plants, pow-
der works, and national utilities, with
control of coast defenses and opera-
tions in conjunction with the mobile
army.
L. H. WILSON, '19
DIES FROM FEVER

NAVY DEPARTMENT PLANS TO OBTAIN ADEQUATE SUPPLY OF
ITIONS; NEXT MOVE MY BE TO ASSUIE CON-
TROL OF COMMUNICATION LiNES

WILSON CALLS EXTRA SESSION OF CONGRESS ON

Amsterdam, March 2.1.-Germuany expects war with the United Stati
within 48 hours, according to private messages to the Bourse here.
From Berlin the adjices said that the Berlin foreign obice had warne
American newspapermen of the nearness O the formaml clash.
The general opinion seemed to be that the action to be assumed by ti
United States would result in the existetice of a state of war, and not
declaration of war.
Washington, Mlarch 21.- President Wilson called for an extra sessio
of congress today to convene on April 2.
The president stated that the purpose of the extra session is to conside
the "state of war that now exists between the United States and Ge
many."
The president's action was takeu following the strong pressure from hi
cabinet, members of congress and the dletiand froni the country at larg

I

Committee

of Counsel of National . efense Meets 'with Secretary Baker
Plan Imnn-ediate Co-opera t ion of oViermnent and Pri.
vate Munition aks ing Concerns

Student

Succumbs After
Ten Days; Mother
Bedside

Illness
at

of

John H. Wilson, '19, died at 2 o'clock
yesterday afternoon from complica-
tions caused by scarlet fever. Mrs. S
H. Wilson was at the bedside when her
son passed away. Samuel H. Wilson,
president of the Western Manufactur-
ing company at Leavenworth, Kan.,
arrived at 2:30 o'clock yesterday
afternoon.
The deceased was taken sick a week
ago Sunday afternoon and quarantined
at the Sigma Phi fraternity at ,426 N.
Ingalls street. Mrs. Wilson came to
Ann Arbor at once.
John Wilson was 22 years of age
and a member of the Sigma Phi fra-
ternity. He remained out of the Uni-
versity since thesecond semester of
1915, re-entering this year at the open-
ing of the second semester. He leaves
his father and mother, and a brother,
Percival L. Wilson, '19.
The remains will be accompanied
by his parents this afternoon to
Leavenworth, Kan., where the funeral
services will be held..
OSBORNE TO SPEAK
Former Sing Sing Warden to Talk at
Methodist Church Sunday
Thomas Mott Osborne, manufac-
turer, writer, traveler, reformer, and
ex-warden of Sing Sing state prison,!
will address the Wesleyan guild on
"Common Sense in Prison Manage-
ment" at 7:30 o'clock Sunday night in
the, First Methodist church.
Mr. Osborne was for several years
chairman. of both the national com-
mission on prison reform and the New
York commission on prison, labor.

PRESIDENT PANS NO
CHAgNGES IN CAINET
NO FORMAL RESIGNATIONS AS
VET SUBMITTED TO
EXECUTIVE
By J. P. Yoder
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)r
Washington, March 21.-Despite a
growing demand for a coalition cabi-
net in event of the expected open h s-
tilities between the United States and
Germany, President Wilson at this
time is not considering such a step it
was strongly intimated today. It was.
learned officially that the president is
considering no changes in his cabinet.
No Resignations Tendered
It was also learned positively that
no formal resignation of present cab-
inet members have been presented to
the president, although each member
has, in accordance with custom, in-
formally indicated to the president his
willingness to retire should the presi-
dent deem changes advisable.
The nearest approach to a coalition
cabinet it was stated would be a
broader authority for the national
counsel of defense, the membership of
which includes all the members of
President Wilson's cabinet.
The defense counsel authorized by
congress and a quasi-official body now
in charge of the important work of
mobilizing the nation's financial, in-
dustrial, social, and individual re-
sources, it seemed certain today, will
be made the president's war counsel.
Railroad Head Ready for Service
Daniel Willard, president of the
Baltimore and Ohio railroad, now in
charge of the transportation division
of the defense counsel, has made all
plans to quit his private duties and
take the post of head of this war
counsel's transportation portfolio
Samuel Gompers, president of the Am-
erican Federation of Labor, and head
of the defense counsel's labor division,
would probably be given the post of
head of a labor portfolio in the pro-
posed war counsel.
Nation's Leaders on Defense Counsel
The defense counsel, it was pointed
out today, is comprised of the na-
tion's biggest industrial, financial, and
manufacturing leaders of all political
faiths. It was also pointed out that
to create new cabinet posts would take'
action by congress.

By Robert J. Bender
(United Press Staff Corresponden
Washington, March 21.-The fi
apparently warlike step to be ta]
by the government following Pri
dent Wilson's call for an extra
dinary congress session for Apri
came late today when the munitio
standardization committee of
counsel of national defense met w
Secretary Baker behind closed doo
The object of the meeting is to p
inmuediate co-operation of the gove
mcn t and private munition mak
2oncerns.
While nothing official could
learned regarding the meeting, it
known that the defense counsel
weeks has been consulting with
nation's largest manufacturers
powder, explosives of other desc:
tions, and of rifles and all manned
guns with the intent of standardi2
of output with the least possible
lay and expense.
Department Opens Bids
Meantime other branches started
once to work on plans that have b
formulated by the national defe
counsel on other lines. The first
stallment of bids for the 200 or n
submarine chasers for the navy w
opened at the department this m
Nearly 100 additional boat build
concerns were requested to info
the government of their capacity
turrning out the chaser boats. Ke
for 60 are now being laid at the I
York navy yard, and four at the I
Orleans yard.
-ay Commandeer Plants
Plans for obtaining an instant
adequate supply of munitions are
der way. Munition firms which c
tinue to hold out for exorbitant pr
are expected to be summarily c
mandeered by the government. Na
architects were directed today to i
to completion plans for three n
42,000-ton superdreadnaughts, 15
stroyers, and three 8,800-ton sub
rines.
It is probable the next move of
department will be to assume con
over all radio apparatus in the co
try to prevent information of the g
ernment's defense measures from
ing abroad. The general staff- of
army has in its hands plans fo
complete and immediate co-ordina
of all telegraph and telephone
tems. Instantaneous communica
with distant points will be establis
from army and navy headquarters
expedite an anticipated mobiliza
(Continued on Page Six.)

of the Michigan Union when it moves and urged them to get more men to
into the new clubhouse, take advantage of the drills.
The officers in charge of the .drills
Seniors Debate on Yale Liquor Rule are anxious to increase the number
New Haven, March 21.--Liquor is of recruits. There is still ample room
again in the limelight on the Yale to handle a large additional number
campus as the seniors are trying to on Wednesday night. The only equip-
decide whether their class events shall ment necessary is a pair of gym
be wet or dry, shoes. Those already enrolled are
Members of the class will ballot to urged to bring other men with them.
R n fin wih or in th mA itf.

ascertain wnich are int ne majority,
prohibitionists or wets, and if beer
and other intoxicants served at class
banquets and alumni reunions shall
be paid for out of the class treasury.
Students Quarantined with Measles
Frederick L. King, '19, 514 Cheever
court and James H. Galloway, '18, 620
Monroe street, are quarantined in
their rooms with German measles.

EX-GOVERNOR FERRIS WILL
ADDRESS INSTITUTE STUDENTS
The Hon. Woodbridge N. Ferris will
be the principal speaker at the eighth
annual banquet of the Ferris insti-
tute students to be held at 8 o'clock
tomorrow night in the city Y. M. C. A.
Prof. R. D. Hollister of the oratorical
department will respond to a toast.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan