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March 21, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-21

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11-IL WLA1-K1C'
FAIR AND WARNER
TODAY

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Lit I!3Uf

mill

UNITED PRES
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

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I-

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 1917.

PRICE FIVE C

"VOL. XXVII. No. 120.

CABINET SESSION
BRINGS NO CHANGE
IN WARSTUTO
IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT EX-
:" ~ PECTED SOON ON
CRISIS
MEMBERS BOUND TO
KEEP UTTER SECRECY
No Additional Orders to Navy Depart-
ment Given; Extra Session
Question UnsolvedĀ£
Washington, March 20.-Shortly
after today's cabinet meeting
broke up the following statement
was authorized by the White
House: "The president and his
cabinet discussed every detail of
the situation fully. Beyond that
there is nothing to say."
There was no indication that
this statement would be ampli-
fled before morning at least.
By Robert J. Bend'er
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, March 20.-There has
been no change in the international
situation since Sunday. This was one
of two known facts that could be
learned following a two-hour and 20
minute session of the cabinet with
President Wilson this afternoon.
Silent About Discussion
The second fact was that no addi-
tional orders were issued to the navy
department along with those to speed
up defense plans against German sub-
marines. Only one cabinet member'
would say a word as to what weighty
matters were discussed behind the
cabinet room doors, and he was un-
usually reticent even in giving the two
facts he dd give.
Despite a silence unparalleled by
cabinet officials since the start of the
war there was a general belief that
some important announcement might
be forthcoming tonight from the
White House as to President Wilson's
views and policies in the present in-
ternational crisis. Before they left
the session the cabinet members were
bound to utter secrecy.
No Announcement of Session
If any definite step was decided on,
none of the officials would discuss it.
They would not indicate even whether
President Wilson himself might have
an announcement to make or whether
there would be an extra session earlier
than April 16.
EMSWILER TO SPEAK
Will Address Weekly Fresh Engineer
Assembly Today

U.S. Recognizes
New Government
To Send Greetings to Russian Regime,
as Soon as It Establishes
Itself
Washington, March 20.-The United
States government is preparing to
recognize the new rule established by
the Russian revolution, it was learned
today. As soon as the new Russian
regime definitely formulates itself the
United States will send greetings. The
Russian army and navy support the
new government, Ambassador Francis
reported to the state department to-
day.
M inister Morris, Stockholm, report-
ed today that the gendarmerie of Fin-
land had been abolished by the duma
commissionaries and that the Finns
had expressed confidence in the new
regime. Governor-General Seyns of
Finland has been arrested and the
Russian senator, Lipski, has been ap-
pointed in his place.
There was no mention of the Hel-
singfor rioting or at least the depart-
ment made no mention of rioting
there.
SAYS AMERICANS
NOT RESPONSIBLE
Major G. 6. Williams Addresses Xili-
itary Organization Last
Night

I 1.._

GERMAN RETREAT
BECOMES SLOWER
!'e to Either Stormy Weather or to
Teutons Reaching Prepared
Positions
E GACEMENT MAY BE PRELUDE
TO WORLD'S BIGGEST BATTLE
Use Cavalry for First Time in Con-
centrated Attacks Since Early
Days of War
London, March 2.-The German re-
treat on the west front slowed up per-
ceptibly today. Dispatches from the
press headquarters at the British front
said this might possibly be attribut-
ed to stormy weather. It was also
possible it might mean the Germans
were reaching the line of their long
prepared positions.
Despite the weather and the, slow-
ing up of the German flight the Brit-
ish, nevertheless, progressed consider-
ably, the dispatch said. The French
official statement of today indicated a
similar slowing up between the Avre
and the Oise of the German retreat
and, likewise, remarked on the bad
weather.
The Berlin statement revealed a
number of engagements along the
whole of this front. The forces en-
gaged in this theater of the war are
now fighting intopen ranks.
Cavalry has been called into use
here for the first time in definite con-
centrated attack since the early days
of the war. Military experts have been
predicting for some days a slowing up
in the German flight due to the ap-
proach of the retiring troops to the
new Hindenburg line where positions
have been prepared for months.
It may be that the fighting is mere-
ly a prelude to a general engagement
all along this front. Such an engage-
ment due to the length of the front,
the preparations made by the belliger-
ents, and the approach of the warmer
weather, may bring the greatest battle
in the world's history.
INCREASED LAND
FORCE NECESSARY
Needed to Protect Railway Bridges,
Seacoast Towns, and Wa-
ter Systems

Wrings Renolver To Wilson
Instead. Of Suit Of Armor
Washington, March 20.-Alexander Gwiazdowski, 31 years old, of
Toledo, is under arrest today following his effort to make a tele-
phone engagement with President Wilson. Gwiazdowski said he
wanted to show a suit of armor worn by Russian soldiers in the
Japanese war. Gwiazdowski waa accompanied by Joseph Klodziez-
czak, 25 years old. Detectives declared he neglected to bring the
suit of armor, but had instead a revolver and 25 cents in cash.

SEENSTARS OF
APPEAR TONIGI
OLD ACTORS VIE WITH NEW
OPENING 1917 UNION
SHOW

I_,

US. HAS SUPPORT Of AlL
SOUTH AMERICAN STATES

PREPARE FOR LARGE
ATTENDANCE AT DRILL

SO DECLARES ALVAREZ IN
ON INTERNATIONAL
LAW
"In case of war the United
will have the sympathy of
South America," declared

TALK

States
entire
Senor

"The one thing that is lacking in
the American people today is individ-
ual feeling of responsibility to our
country," said Major Gardener S. Wil-"
liams to graduates of national military
camps who met last night in the Eng-
ineering building for the purpose of
organization and to adopt means of
getting recruits to the summer milit-
ary camps.
Major Williams, formerly a member
of the engineering faculty, and who
is now chairman of the local commit-
tee of the. National Military Training
Camp association, emphasized the
need for military training and exnrt-
ed the i ne to do all in their power
to increase the number of recruits
to the summer camps.
"The men who died in the Spanish-
American war," he said, "died from
ignorance of how to take care of them-
selves in the field, because they lacked
the training that the military camps
are offering American citizens today."
Prof. Joseph A. Bursley was chosen
chairman of the organization. The
other officers selected are H. Gray
Muzzy, '17, vice-chairman, and John
C. B. Parker, '17, secretary-treasurer.
The organization will be known as
the "University of Michigan Branch of
Military Training Camps association."
Another meeting will be held at 7
o'clock next Tuesday evening in room
243 Engineering building.
ADELPHI HOUSE CHOOSES MEN
TO DEBATE ALPHA NU SOCIETY

Alejandr't Alvarez in his address on
"Fundamental Rights in International1
Law" yesterday afternoon in the Eco-
nomics building. The reason for this,1
the speaker said, is the tendency to-
ward pan-Americanism which is the
policy of Latin-American .countries.
"American universities have the
duty of correcting what might be
called a lack of Americanism," said
Dr. Alvarez. "It is the duty of scien-
tific men to study the social and po-
litical reaction that will follow the
war. This study must start at the in-
tellectual centers, at the universities."
Dwells on Wkr
The speaker next dwelt on the pres-
ent war, declaring that America has
protested against certain action by
the belligerent states because it vio-
lated the law of neutrality. "Every1
violation of international law is a
menace to the peace, commerce, and
tranquillity of every country," he de-
clared.,
The distinguished Chilean piblcist
next pleaded for a reconciliation of1
Latin-American and Anglo-Saxon
theories and doctrines of international
law. He traced the development of
this body of science from the seven-
teenth century to the present, declar-
ing that the South American countries
hold continental doctrines and that
the United States clings to English
tenets of international law, because
states depend largely on their mother
countries for their ideas.
Existing Laws Weak
There are weak points in each
school of the law, said Senor Alvarez,
and a careful study of international
law will show that its existing rules
are not all of universal application,
but are simply national in character.
A new way of studying international
law in the Americas Is necessary, de-
clared the speaker, "to find the dif-
ferences between the two schools and
to reconcile them. This will lead to
an American contnenta scpl which
will, ex.rcise great influence in the
ifuture development of both conti-
nental and Anglo-Saxon international
law."
Senor Alvarez will deliver the sec-
ond ofthis series of three talks on in-
ternational law at 4:15 o'clock this
afternoon in room 101 of the Eco-
nomics building. His subjet is, "The
Necessity of Reconstructing Interna-
tional Law."
Columbia Fights for Free Speech
New York City, March 20.-Charg-
ing the board of trustees with at-
tempting to "Prussianize" Columbia,
the Spectator, Columbia's daily paper,
has entered a protest against investi-
gations which are being conducted by
the board to ascertain, whether dis-
loyalty to the United States is being
taught in the class room.
According to the editorial in which
this protest is made, faculty and stu-
dents alike look upon this move as one
which will deprive them of the free-
dom of speech which they now poss-
ess. .

CORPS TO BE COMPLETELY RE-
ORGANIZED AT TONIGHT'S
ASSEMBLY
Preparations for the largest attend-
ance recorded this year have been
made by the officers of the voluntary
drill corps for tonight's meeting. At
least 250 men are expected to appear.
The feature of tonight's drill will
be complete reorganization. Three
companies will be formed and each
company divided into two platoons.
Each platoon will in turn be divided
into three squads.
The captains of the three companies
are as follows: Company A, J. D.
Lowry; Company B, Mason Lyons,
'19M; Company C, Nathan Schermer,
'19E. A fourth company will be or-
ganized if there are men enough to
warrant it. Major Clyde E. Wilson
will act as commanding officer of the
entire organization.
The work tonight will consist of
close and extended order drills and
the manual of arms. By courtesy of
Dean Myra B. Jordan the men will
have the use of Barbour gymnasium.
The drill will begin promptly at 7
o'clock and continue for two hours.,
The men will' be addtessed during
the evening by Lieutenant Henshaw
of Company B. His subject will be
"The Duties of the Engineering Corps
in the Field."

"FOOLS' PARADISE" TO
BEGIN' AT 8 O'CLOCK
Final . Dress Rehearsal Finds Cas
and Chorus Ready for
Debut
"Fools' Paradise" opens at 8 o'cloc
tonight in the Whitney theater.
With cast and chorus in the best c
trim and a capacity house assured
Michigan's 1917 Union opera wi1
make its debut before an expectat
first night audience.
Vieing with the stars of 1917, seve
men who have had prominent par
in past operas will be present to sin
again the favorite songs from forme
productions. Durward Grinstead
Edgar Bowen, Fred Lawton, Fran
Bachman, Waldo Fellows, Roy Scar
lon, and George McMahon will be I
the boxes, as well as Donal Haines
author of a former opera book.
Cast and Chorus Ready
The final dress rehearsal last nigh
found the cast and chorus ready fo
the footlights, while the orehestr
demonstrated its mastery over t'
musical side of this year's opera.
"Fools' Paradise" has a local se
ting, the campus scenery being one o
the points in which this year's oper
differs entirely from other shows o
recent years.
Shows Fraternity and Dorm
The first act shows the Kapp;
Climax fraternity and the Cookberx
dormitory, with the Library in th
background. The second scene is lai
in the new Union building and po:
trays the interior of the structure a
it will appear when completed. Wit
the possible exception of "Mich
genda," no opera has had such a
abundance of local color.
A. A. Schupp, '17E, general chai
man of the opera committee, will I
in charge of all performances afte
the opening night, as Director Morga
will leave for Philddelphia immediat
ly after the first performance.

ART EXHIBIT

OPENSI

Reception Given Last Night to Ann
Arbor Art Association

Prof. J. E. Emswiler will address
the weekly fresh engineer assembly
at 11 o'clock this morning in room
348 Engineering building on "The
Structure of the Mechanical Engineer-
ing Course and the Group System."
Prof. S. J. Zowski will speak to the
assembly at a later date on other
phases of mechanical engineering.
These representatives of the me-
chanical engineering department will
aid the freshmen to choose their
courses by lecturing upon their pro-
fession and giving information so that
the first year men can determine the
particular line of engineering they are
best suited for.
Prof. H. E. Riggs Leaves for Chicago
Prof. Henry E. Riggs of the civil
engineering department is attending
the convention of American civil and
railroad engineers which is now being
held in Chicago. From there he will
go to Kansas City where he will be
the principal speaker at a meeting
of the alumni of the University of
Kansas on Saturday night.

At the close of the tryout for the
freshman debating team to represent
the Adelphi house of representatives
in a contest with the Alpha Nu De-
bating society, the following men were
chosen to comprise the Adelphi squad:
Albert E. Sawyer, '20, Lawrence Selt-
zer, '20, and A. Joseph Himmelhoch,
'20. C. H. Daley, '20, will act as
alternate.
The next meeting of the house will
be held on Tuesday evening, March
27, at which time the Republican party
will foster a measure by which the
United States will take an active part
in the formation of a league to en-
force peace.
EXPECT UNION DINING ROOM
READY FOR USE THIS WEEK
Denny Donovan, Michigan Union
steward, states that he hopes to have
the club dining rooms ready for the
use of members by the end of this
week. Repair work and redecorating]
is being pushed in an effort to open
up the cafe by that time.

Washington, March 20.-While de-
tails of defense plans naturally are
being kept secret, signs increased to-
day that officials realized the neces-
sity for an increased land force if fed-
eral protection is to be accorded great
railroad bridges, seacoast towns, and
vast water supply systems on which
the nation's largest centers depend.
War heads say they are certain that
when congress comes back April 16,
and the army appropriation comes up
there will be small opposition to Sen-
ator Chamberlain's universal military
training plan or some similar system.
Some go so far as to say that they
expect President Wilson and Secretary
Baker to come out and urge a uni-
versal system.
SPANISH CLUB TO FORMULATE
PLANS AND ELECT OFFICERS
Officers will be elected and general
plans made at the first meeting of the
Spanish club to be held at 5 o'clock
today in room 403 south wing, Uni-
versity hall.
Two plans are now being consid-
ered as to the manner in which the
meetings will be conducted. Some of
those interested propose that the club
meet formally and under the super-
vision of the faculty. Others say that
it would be best to meet informally
for conversational purposes. One of
these methods will be decided upon
today.

The Ann Arbor Art association ex-
hibit was formally opened last night
when a reception was given to the
members of the association.
The exhibit is entirely made up of
paintings owned by Ann Arbor peo-
ple or by Ann Arbor artists. Prom-
inent among the works of the local ar-
tists are the landscapes of Mr. E. H.
Barnes, and the series on Notre Dame
by Mr. L. J. Makielski. Etchings by
Rembrant, Zorn, and Seymour Hadon
are on exhibition. Paintings by Whist-
ler, Platt, and of such prominent
American artists as Winslow Homer
and Elizabeth Nourse are also shown.
REV. FR. DILLON TO ADDRESS
CATHOLIC STUDENTS TONIGHT
The Rev. Fr. David L. Dillon, '96L,
of Fenton, will address the Catholic
Students' club tonight on "Duties of
a Catholic Alumnus in Public Life."
The lecture will be given at 7:30
o'clock in the Knights of Columbus
parlors at the corner of Huron and
Division streets.
Honor System Falls at Ohio State
Columbus, O., March 20.- In the
opinion of a number of professors the
campaign to establish an honor tra-
dition at Ohio State has proved itself
a failure.
One professor thinks that the re-
form failed because it was forced upon
the student body, thereby depriving it
of its real force. He points out that
the slogans of the campaign 'tended
to arouse opposition by their assump-
tion that all students cheated.

FIRST NAVAL BALL.
TO BE HELD FRIDAY
K. W. Heinrich, '17, and Lois Donald
son, '18, to Lead Grand
March
The first naval ball to be held a
any university in this country wil
open at 9:30 o'clock Friday evenin
at the Armory, with Kenneth V
feinrich, '17, and Lois E. Donaldsoi
'17. leading the grand march. A re
ception will be held from 9 to 9:3
o'clock.
2he officers will wear service blu
uniforms, and the marines the regu
lar full dress white.
President Harry B. Hutchins, RE
gent Junius E. Beal, and the deans c
all the colleges will be patrons of thi
affs ir. The Detroit officers of ti
First battalion, Michigan naval militi,
will attend.
Ike Fisher's 20-piece military ban
will make its first appearance in un
form. Another ,unique feature will b
the programs which will contain cut
of the ship and landing force work.
Prof. C. E. Eggert Addresses Verel
Eats, drinks, and short talks wer
combined in the program of tb
Deutscher Verein men's get-togethE
last night in Lane hall. Prof. Ca
E. Eggert discussed the ideals of ti
Verein, 'while Dr. H. J. Weigand an
several of the older men respondE
to informal toasts. Lawrence Gol(
sr it'i, '19, acted as toastmaster.

On Sale'

ON SALE TODAY=

IA

Everywhere

GARGO

LE

I

On sale

Everlywhere

15 cents

Showing the Funny Side of the Opera

15 cents

..

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