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March 20, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CHIGAN

r

f '

i

4'

SPRING
SHOWING

Calkin

T might pay you to talk
with us about exchanging
your old Kodak for a new
model or one with a better

Dru

Cordovan s
We have just received
another shipment of
this popular shoe in
BLACK and TAN.
Special Agency Nettleton shoes

Co.

les.

308 So. State

or 1123 So. Univ. Ave.

of the new

smart orhes

$20 to $40

Lindenschmidt, Apfel Co.

J

r

At Fourth Ave. and Liberty St.
Laboratory Supplies

Chemicals - Drugs -

Toilet Articles

and Drug Sundries
The Eberbach & Son Co.

t

What about

that

New

GOYERNMENT TO BLAMEI
FOR RAILROAD TROUBLE
COMMISSIONS HITE CUT ALL
PROFITS, SAYS LAST
BACHE REVIEW
That the government is to blame
for the railroad trouble is the sub-a
stance of an article in last Saturday's
number of the Bache Review, a pub-;
lication dealing with business condi-I
tions.
The paper further says that "the<
results of national and state regula-
tion by commissions in the last 10
years have been to increase expensesI
and by keeping down rates, to dwarf
earnings to a point where no new in-
vestment money is attracted to theI
business.'
Regulation came in the first place{
because the railroads were neglect-I
ing the people and looking after their
own interests. As a punishment for
this, they were forced to bow to the
government. Since then, the idea hasf
not wholly disappeared, from the char-
acter of the action taken against the
roads.
The effect of this strict regulation
has been to cut the profits of the
roads to such a low figure that it is
almost impossible to obtain new funds
on bond issues. It has been computed
that since 1907, profits have been re-
duced over $95,000,000.
Expenses of running the roads have
been steadily increasing. Bituminous
coal has so soared in price that esti-
mates place the increase in its cost
to the railroads at about $130,000,000.
Still, while the cost of maintenance
has increased, the rates have been
kept the same. Many roads in the
country have been placed in the hands
of the receiver, and others are verg-
ing on bankruptcy. Consequently, if
wages are to be raised, the govern-
ment must see that the rates are
raised so that the roads can afford
the increase.
The Bache Review advocates "broad-
er minded regulation." It does not
favor government ownership, as it
says "it will cost the people more in
the end than advanced rates under
the government regulation."
Extension Lectures
Prof. Charles S. Berry will lecture
tonight in Lansing on "Medical In-
spection of Schools."
"Civic Improvement" is the subject
on which Prof. Aubrey Tealdi will
speak tonight in Adrian, Mich.
Prof. R. H. Curtiss will discuss
"What Every One Should Know of
Astronomy" tomorrow in Athens,
Mich.

1k

Suit for Spring

TI I lI-N

IN VIRTUE SAME AS IN
LINE SAYS PROF.
SH EPAIRD

"We must not think that moral train-
ing is in any way isolated from any
other branch of training," said Prof.l
J. F. Shepard of the psychology de-t
partment, in his talk on "Moral Edu-
cation" before the Students' society
of the Unitarian church last Sunday
evening. "All education must include
moral education if it is to be com-
plete.
According to Professor Shepard, two
fundamentals of moral training are
habit and reason. "A great influence
in forming habit is the reading of bi-
ographies of various types of people,"
ho said. In regard to the training of
reason, Professor Shepard said: "A
bad influence is exerted of the 'mov-
ies,' in that they discourage connect-
ed thinking."'
A quartet composed of Ester Cris-#
taneli, soprano; Miss Beecham, con-
tralto; C. A. Ross, tenor, and E. E.
Watson, bass, sang, accompanied by,
Miss Scholl. Following the meeting
refreshments were served.
Next Sunday evening Prof. W. L.,
Schurz will talk to the society on
"Spain," and on March 31, a farce
comedy "A Case of Suspension," will
be presented under the direction of
R. C. Hunter, '17.
BLINDFOLDl)E P OFESSOR IN
BAFFLING CHESS PLAY WINS
Prof. Karpinski Foils Foes in Ancient
Pastime of the Checkered
Boards and Kings
Prof. L. C. Karpinski gave an ex-
hibition of simultaneous chess playing
following the meeting of the Chess
and Checker club in the Natural Sci-
ence building on Saturday night.
Ile played one game blindfolded
one against two players in consulta-
tion, three with individuals not con-
sulting, and a game of checkers be-
sides. Prof. Karpinski won the three
games with the persons playing alone.
BeI lost the consultation game, and
finished the game which he started
blindfolded across the board, ending
it in a draw. He won the game ,of
checkers.
Thekwireless match was continued,
but not finished, the Ohio State play-
ers refusing to play after 12:3Q
o'clock. It will probably be contin-
ued next Saturday night.
JESS R. SIMPSON, '18, TALKS
ON PEACE AND MISSIONARY

We have some beauties at $20,$22.50 and $25
made to your measure by the Royal Tailors of
Chicago.
Drop in and look them over whether it be a
New or Staple Pattern we have it.
Campus Bootery
308 S. State St. Opposite Huston's
Bostonian and Florsheim Shoes
(NEW SPRING STYLES)

Filtered
Drinking Water

e

HABIT AND REASON TWO
MAIN MORAL PRINCIPLES

Intercollegi ate
Princeton: Sixty-five men have re-
ported for the first football practice
of the year. The squad was given
a stiff tryout and will be taken out-
doors as soon as the weather per-
mits.
California: The tennis team will
not take its scheduled trip east this
year owing to the inability of the
captain to accompany the team. Cap-
tain Rogers' physician has forbidden
his travelling.
Indiana: Two hundred fifty-five
school basketball teams are compet-
ing for the honor of representing their
sections in the final contest which
will be held here soon. The Boosters'
club of the university is holding the
contests.
California: The senior class this
year will be the last to observe one
of the oldest traditions of the univer-
sity. It has been customary for the
seniors on their pilgrimage during
class week to deliver an address from
the steps of North hall. This build-
ing is to be destroyed in the sum-
mer so the 1917 class will bid it
adieu for the university.
Princeton: Less than 4 freshmen
attended the athletic meeting which
was held to secure the support of the
class of 1920. These meetings are in-
tended to stir up enthusiasm in the
freshman and sophomore classes but
they do not seem to prove effective
because of the small attendance.
California: 'he new chemistry
building will be ready for occupancy
about July 1 and may be used during
part of the summer session. This is
the first wing of a new structure
which will in time replace the old
red brick building now being used
for chemistry.
Indiana: Seieral students of the
university will take the United States
military examination for second lieu-
tenancies which will be held begin-
ning April 23 and July 23. Candidates
from civil life may enroll for the tests.
Indiana: The secretary of the fac-
ulty has compiled a book of rules and
regulations of the faculty of the un-
iversity. The book will be off the
press soon and is creating interest
among the professors inasmuch as it
is an innovation.
Oregon: Committees for the junior
week-end events have been appointed
by the class president and prepara-
tions are now well under way. A
parade, water fete, dance, track meet,
smoker, and senior class play are on
the, program.
Syracuse: Women 'of the univer-
sity recently pledged their support to
raise funds for the purchase and
equipment of a Syracuse ambulance
to be sent to the Mexican front or the
French service. Funds to date have
totaled only $5 and the campaign
promises to be a failure unless her-
culean efforts are made to urge sub-
scriptions.
Minneapolis: Anna Britt is the
third University of Minnesota student
to contract smallpox. Miss Brit~t, who
is a freshman in the academic col-
lege, attended classes Friday and
Saturday, exposing many students to
the disease.
Iowa City: Profit amounting to
about $200 was made on the annual
junior prom at the University of
Iowa this year. The fact that com-
plimentary tickets were done away
with this year is said to be the main
reason for the profit instead of the
loss on the party as in former years.
Lafayette: Along with military
training a plan has been devised at
Purdue university whereby freshmen

will be given a course in the customs
and traditions of the school. Officers
of the cadet corps will have charge
of the instruction which will take
place during rest hours.
Chicago: According to the Daily
Maroon of the University of Chicago,
the Chicago Glee club has a trip
planned for the latter part of April
which includes Detroit, Toledo, and
Ann Arbor. While in Ann Arbor the
club will give a concert in conjunc-
tion with the University of Michigan
club.

Mai .St.

WAHK'S Lhoe Stores

State 3t.

.First

We are showing tf
nobbiest line of
SPRING SUITS

Showing

and
TOP COATS

in the city.

Also a big lineof th
New Spring Hat
Caps, and Furnish
ings.

of
Spring Clothes

\YI'
Fitform Clothes

Pasteurized
Milk

ireakfast as you like it
STATE STRIEET
LUiNCH
Open
6:00 A. M. till midnight
Special 25c Dinner
11:30 A. M. till 1:30 P. M.
Special 25c Supper
.5:30 to 7:00 P. M.
What you want'
When you want it

IF YOU HAVE BEEN IN
THE HABIT OF BUY-
ING READY-MADE
CLOTHES, UPSET THE
.IDEA, AND LET MAR-
QUARDT MAKE YOU A
SUIT THAT WILL BE
OF THE CORRECT
PROPORTIONS, BOTH
AS TO ITS PHYSICAL
AND FINANCIAL AS-
PECTS.
MARQUARDT
Campus Tailor
516 E. William St.

TOM CORBETT
116 E. Liberty St.
"ihe Young Nen 's Sho"

Prof. George W
ture tomorrow n
Mich., on "Why t
lar Is Shrinking."

. Dowrie will lec-
night in Blissfield,
the Consumer's Dol-

As you want it
Perfectly
Sanitary

Inspection
Invited

this evening on the subject of "Su-
pervised Study," more particularly
with reference to the experimental in-
vestigation being carried on in the
state under the auspices of the Michi-
gan Schoolmasters' club.
The meeting will be held at the
home of Annetta Wood, '17, 921 Church
street, and a social evening will fol-
low the discussion. All members are
urged to attend.

Prof. Breed to Speak to Honorary Club
Prof. F. S. Breed of the education
department will speak to the Girls'
Honorary Educational club at 7:30

Hospital Notes
Ewald Schulz, '17, 431 East Univer-
sity avenue, took sick with pneumonia
and was removed to the University
hospital.
Two more cases of measles have
been reported by the University health
service.
Health of Professor Bogle is Improved
Prof. Thomas A. Bogle of the Law
school, who has been unable to meet
Iis classes for the last two weeks on
account ,of illness, is at the present
very much improved in health. How-
ever, it will be several weeks yet be-
fore he will be able to resume his
work again.

Jess R. Simpson, '18, addressed the
class of students studying missionary
conditions and world peace last night'
in Lane hall. The subject of Simp-
son's talk was "What Shall We do Aft-
er the War." The folly of war was
taken up andathe general relationbe-
tween war and missionary work was
described.
The speaker aimed to show that
more could be gained by, missionary
work than by war and that America's
attitude toward war is one that will'
eventually be taken up by all the
world. He urged the formation of
some league but showed that the
,form of the league was of minor con-
cern.
This lecture was the third of a ser-
ies of such talks which are being given
every Monday evening in Lane hall.
About 100 people attended the lecture.
Explains Change of Iron Into Pipe
The transformation of iron ore into
commercial pipe was illustrated by
means of three reels of motion pic-
tures in the auditorium of the Natural
Science building last night. H. G.
Texer of the National Tube company
explained the pictures.

Leave CopyLeaveCopy
at ,,at
Quarrs andStudents'
TftaDeta SuVR IS Nppy Stare

City News

The board of directors of the Ann
Arbor Civic association will hold its
regular monthly meeting at 7:3(
o'clock tonight in its rooms in the
city hall.
Police officials found a stray bul
dog yesterday. It will be kept in th4
cellar of the city hall until the owner
calls for it.
Former City Clerk Ross Granger is
still performing the duties of City
Clerk Isaac Reynolds, as the latter is
in a weak condition yet from his re
cent illness, due to scarlet fever.
All through telephone lines which
were torn down by the sleet storm o:
last week have been put into tem-
porary working order. It will be 1(
days before all of the poles can be
erected and the wires put in their
proper place.
WASHINGTON FACULTY ACTS
IN FAVOR OF WILSON POLICY
Seattle, March 19.-Ninety-one mem-
bers of the University of Washington
faculty, including seven deans, signed
a telegram to President Wilson in
support of his foreign policy.
A prominent member of the chem-
istry department estimated that 95
per cent of the faculty is back of the
president in his recent movements.
I can duplicate any lens. J. L
Chapman; Optrometrist and Jeweler,

FOR SALE
FOR SALE OR RENT-Rare oppor-
tunity for Fraternity or Girls' club
to rent or buy best rooming house
near campus. Large grounds. Phone
110-M or 536-J. 20-22
FOR SALE-4 Opera seats in center
section, downstairs, Friday night.
Call 633-R. Rosenfeld. 20
FOR SALE-The best and least expen-
sive way of buying, is to let The
Michigan Daily be your medium.

MISCELLANEOUS.
BUSINESS OPORTUNITY-Sell San-
itary Brushes. See Mr. Hollister
representing The Detroit" Sanitary.
Brush Co. at the Allenel hotel Wed-
nesday and Thursday, March 21 and
22 from 2:00 to 8:00 P. M. You
can't afford to over look this. 18-29
LOST
LOST-A Kappa key. Name on back.
Call 2339. Reward. Kathryn Glass.
LOST-Friday evening, silver filigree
bar pin. Please call 670-J. 20-21

..

.v

U

r

Our Great Co-operative Sale of
Pianos and Player Pianos
Will save you Money
Beautiful New Grand Pianos
$460.00 Time Payment
Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Main St.

Phone 1707

.

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