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March 20, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-20

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HE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW
TODAY

L

'I~fir SW gank

Ahv
jDatt

__ __. -

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

I

_I

,1- -

VOL. XXVII. No. 119.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 1917.

PRICE FIVE

.,.

i 2

I

I

PRESIDENT GIVES
DANIELS POWER TO
USE APPROPRIATION

I

Pi Delta Epsilon
Offers $10 Prize

AUTHORIZED TO BUILD SHIPS
WITH $115,000,000 RE-
SERVE MONEY
MAY MOBILIZE SHIPS
IN ATL ANTIC FLEET
Defense Council Meets Telephone and
Telegraph Heads to Prepare
for Emergencies
Washington, March 19.-President
Wilson this afternoon authorized Sec-
retary of the Navy Daniels to use the
$115,000,000 emergency naval approp-
riation, the navy department an;
nounced today. The money was ap-
propriated by congress to be used in
an emergency for the purpose of
speeding up building of ships.
The president also authorized sus-
pension of the eight-hour law in ship
yards as another speeding up meas-
ure. This applies to all plants hav-
ing to do with naval construction for
.the government. The greater part of
the money will be used in cons1truct-
ing submarine chasers and scout cruis-
ers, according to tentative plans an-
nounced by Secretary Daniels several
weeks ago.
Will Take All Possible Measures
"Whatever can be done will be
done," Secretary Daniels declared in
answer to questions as to plans for
dealing with the submarines in the
barred area and likewise near our
own coast. President Wilson and Sec-
retary Daniels did not take up the
question of commandeering ship yards,
but Daniels announced that this step
will be taken if necessary. Daniels
" aid particular stress upon the need
of small boats, but said that a good
deal of the $115,000,000 would be spent
in speeding up work on the larger
vessels. The whole amount may not
be used, but only such amounts as
the department can wisely spend.
Plan to Hunt Out Submarines
While the secretary did not say so
in so many words, the impression he
left was that the administration's plan
now is to hunt out submarines, par-
ticularly if they invade our coast. The
first class at Annapolis will be gradu-
ated the twenty-ninth of this month
and the second class in September,
under orders issued by President
Wilson this afternoon following the
conference with Daniels.
Consider Mobilizing Fleet
General mobilization of the entire
Atlantic fleet, including the calling in
of the naval militia and the reserve
fleet, is under consideration by the de-
partment, Daniels said. A threat to,
commandeer certain American muni'
tion factories followed the conference
between Secretary Daniels and Presi-
dent Wilson.
Indications late this afternoon
pointed strongly to a drastic step by'
the president as' a result of Ger-
many's latest flaunting of her subma-
rine warfare. It is believed that the
step will be taken before many more
hours pass. Many officials thought;
this would place the nation within a
step of war.
Plan Efficient Communication
The national defense council met
with heads of the telegraph and tele-
phone companies of the country to-
day to plan mobilization of communi-
cation systems so as to insure the gov-
ernment the most rapid and efficient
service in the event of war. Theo-
dore N. Vail of the American Tele-
graph and Telephone company headed
this delegagion. There were still
some who believed the president might
call congress before April 16 in order
to have them at hand for conference.
In taking his energetic course the
president is assured of the country's

support, according to his advisors to-
day. To back up this claim scores of
telegrams have come to the White
House urging immediate action of the
most vigorous sort. A majority of
them favor an out and out declaration
of war.
Why Attract Us From (emany Now'
Seattle, Wash., March 19.-To at-
tract American students to Oxford,
that university has begun conferring
the degree of doctor of philosophy.
Heretofore many students wishing it
have gone to Germany,

Upperclass Journalistic Fraternity to
Hold First Campus Edi-
torial Contest
To further the interest in journal-
istic work on the campus an editorial
contest for undergraduates, not on any
University publications, will be opened
today by Pi Delta Epsilon, national
honorary journalistic fraternity. The
winning editorial will bring a prize
of $10 and will be published in The
Michigan Daily.
Editorials for the contest must bear
on some phase of college life and must
not exceed 500 words in length.
Judges, selected from the University
faculty, will be announced within a
few days. The contest will close on
April 21.
The contest is open to any fresh-
man or sophomore of the University
who is not connected with any of the
University publications or who is not
competing for a position on the same.
The rules will be read to all rhetoric
classes by instructors today, and
further information will be published
within the week.
UNIQUE PROLOGUE
IN UNION OPERA
All Now in Readiness for First Pre-
sentation Tomorrow Night
at Whitney
Not the least of the features of
"Fools' Paradise," which makes its
initial appearance tomorrow night, is
the prologue with which it opens, the
scene being laid in the kingdom of
fools where Tontagini, spirit of Michi-
igan, appears seeking and beseeching
the king to send Folly to earth to
lead the people astray, so that in fol-
lowing this external folly they may
become aware of their own folly which
has persisted on earth without their
knowledge.
The second complete dress-rehearsal
held last night at the Whitney theater
was declared a distinct success by Di-
rector Morgan and the committee in
charge. The few necessary altera-
tions in the costumes had been made
and the complete production was
given without a hitch.
All arrangements for the presenta-
tion of the opera at the Lyceum the-
ater in Detroit,rMonday night, April
9, have been completed. The seat sale
started this week for alumni and stu-
dents of the University, the general
seat sale starting next week. Tickets
for this performance can be procured
by sending money orders and a self
addressed envelope to R. B. Potter,
room 25 Detroit opera house block.
BRITISH SHIP IS SUNK
German Destroyers Send One Vessel
to Bottom and Torpedo Another
London, March 19.-German de-
stroyers sank a British destroyer in
the Straits of Dover yesterday morn-
ing and torpedoed a second British
destroyer, according to the admiralty
state ent this afternoon. The latter
British warship was not seriously.
damaged.
The statement revealed that a Brit-
ish merchantman had been torpedoed
and sunk, presumaly by the German
destroyers in the northern Downs.
The Germans escaped in the dark-
ness. "It was impossible to ascertain
the damage we inflicted," the state-
ment said. "The crew were saved
from the British destroyer."
Tickets on Sale for Girls' Play

Tickets for the annual Junior Girls'
play are on sale today by members of
the junior class, at Dean Jordan's of-
fice, and at Wahr's book store. Later
this week a table will be placed in the
Library for the convenience of those
who wish to secure tickets for either
of the performances.
The first performance of the play
is to be given Tuesday evening, March
27, in honor of the senior women. The
second performance will be Saturday
,afternoon, March 31, following the
Michigan women's luncheon.
Admission is open to University,
faculty, and town women.
hobart Guild to Hold Meeting Tonight
The H-obart guild will hold a busi-
ness meeting at Harris hall tonight at
q0 .o o'clock.

APPEALS FOR NEW
CONTGIOS WARD
Faclty Group Petitions City (Conl
for Appropriation to Build
Addition
POSSIBILITY THAT ENTIRE
NEW BUILDING BE ERECTED
President Hutchins Says We Must
Have °Better Provisions in Car-
ing for These Diseases
Appeals were made by several dif-
ferent faculty men last night to the
members of the city council for an
appropriation of $25,000 to construct
a new contagious hospital in Ann Ar-
bor or to make an addition to the
present structure. The matter was re-
ferred to the finance committee and
will probably come up before the vot-
ers of the city at the special election'
on the proposed new charter, which
will be held June 12. It is too late
for the spring election on April 2.
"We must have better provisions for
taking care of our contagious dis-i
eases," said President Harry B.
Hutchins. "The contagious hospital
is tremendously overcrowded at pres-
ent and the city should make arrange-
ments to double the capacity of the
hospital by passing this appropria-
tion."1
"The board of regents would be
back of the proposition, I am sure,"
said Regent Junius E. Beal, "the Uni-
versity would do its part by provid-
ing physicians and provisions."
"We have had to refuse many re-
quests for admittance to the contag-
ious ward," said Dr. Reuben Peterson,
medical director of the University
hospital. "Wherve have 24 beds for
patients with contagious diseases, we
should have 48."
"The city is entirely unprepared to
take care of any epidemic that might>
strike it at any time," said Dr. Wil-
bert B. Hinsdale, dean of the Homoe-
opathic Medical school.<
"The contagious hospital has al-
ready taken care of 186 cases this
year and as we only took care of 22c
patients last year, it looks as though<
we will have more cases this year
than ever before," said Dr. D. M. Cokie
of the Medical school. "We were
forced to put 10 beds in the corri-
dors this year to take care of pati-
ents." -
O~ier talks were given on the sub-<
ject by Prof. N. B. Foster of the
Medical school and Dr. J. A. Wess-
inger, city health officer.
THINKS REVOLUTION
MAY NOT SURVIVE
Germany of Opinion That Russian Up-
rising Is Aid to England
and Entente
Berlin, March 19.-Germany is not
sure the Russian revolutionary gov-
ernment will be able to survive in the1
face of the Russian people's emands
for bread. Higher circles today were
frank in stating their opinions that
the revolution was distinctly an aid
to England and the entente.
The old government hd be isus-k
pected of a desire to mnak ' separat.
peace. The nic foreign minister,
Bilukoff, is kno ere Englnd's
friend. German o
day that in view of
Russian socialists fav an iin ut

peace there is like y to be another.
revolution against the revolutionists+
started by the workmen.
Adelphi Will Hold Meeting Ton'ii,
Adelphi's freshmen will display
their ability as orators at tonight's;
meeting of the house. The fresh tea~m
for inter-debating society struggles
is to be chosen at the meeting from
those trying out, and over a dozen
have . already manifested a desire to'
enter the lists.4
Of the tryouts three are to be sel-
ected for the team, and a fourth -as
alternate. The competition for places
is keen, the entrants having started
to clamor some time ago for an op-
portunity to show their forensic tal-f
ents, and having had several weeks in
which to prepare for the test. Seven
minutes will be allotted to each speak-
er for the presentation of his construc-1
tive argument and any thrusts he mayI
wish to hurl at his opponents.

Chase S. Osborn
Speaks fMarchi 29
To Appear at Initial "Get-Together"
of Journalism Students in
Lane Hall
Ex-Governor Chase S. Osborn will
be the principal speaker at a "get-
together" of students in the journalism
department, to be held at 8 o'clock,
Thursday, March 29, in Lane hall.
Prof. Fred N. Scott, head of the de-
partment here, will speak at this
meeting, which has as its purpose the
furtherance of acquaintanceship be-
tween students, faculty, and alumni.
Lee A. White, '10, recently professor
of journalism at the University of
Washington, now secretary to the pub-
lishers of the Detroit News, will rep-
resent the alumni.
Mr. Osborn will discuss the influ-
ence of college education on newspa-
per men. He made his last appearance
in Ann Arbor early last March when
he became a member of Michigan
chapter of Sigma Delta Chi, under the
auspices of which this meeting is to
take place. This will be the first of
a series of journalistic "get-togeth-
ers." No admission will be charged.

AAM VSON EIGHT HOULLAWDECtARED
CONSTITUTIONAL BY SUPREME COURT:
SIX JUDGES AGREE; THREE DiSSEN

*

* * * * * * * * * * *

WOME N'S

LEAGUE NOVINA-
TIONS

,
*
*

PITNEY, DAY, AND VANDEVENTEI
DISAGREE ITH MA-
JORITY
DECISION REVERSES
LOWER COURT RULING

CANVASS

GETS $1500

hollar.a-Month Club Collects
from City Wards; College to
Be Heard From

Sum

The house-to-house canvass which
the Dollar-a-Month club recently
made in Ann Arbor for the relief of
Belgian children was considered suc-
cessful by those in charge. A report
by Mrs. W. D. Henderson, chairman
of the committee, states that about
$1.140 was collected in the four wards
canvassed and other gifts and pledges
brought the amount to over $1,500.
The report of amounts collected in
donations and pledges by wards is as
follows: First ward, Mrs. D. H. Rams-
dell, chairman, $139.50; Fourth ward,
Mrs. H. J. Brown, chairman, $55.60;
Sixth ward, Mrs. L. McBride, chair-
man, $389; Seventh ward, Mrs. C. O.
Davis, chairman, $521.50. These
amounts give a total of $1,105.60.
Money received for expenses was
$107.50, amounts contributed through-
out the state came up to $256, and
an amount of money given since the
report was completed approximating
$100 give a total of over $1,500 re-
ceived.
The campaign is not completed yet.
The campus organizations and also
the business section are still to be
canvassed.
RUMORS OF REVOLUTION IN
11ERLIN SWEEP UNITED STATES
New York, Ma:ch 19.-Wild rumors
of a revolution in Berlin swept the
United States and Canada this afte -
noon with no apparent basis so far
as could be ascertained. Apparently
they were traceable to recent reports
from continental sources saying there
was unrest in Germany and that the
success of the Russian movement, in
the opinion of some, might embolden
the people of other European nations
to take control.
GERMAN-AiIERI. COUNTY
GFFICER REMVES U. S. FLAG
Fort W\ ayne, r - March 19.-Coup-
ty Commis ;S , ,'weir today ord-
ered the America-i flag removed from.
the window of the Allen county P

* President- Anna Lloyd, '18, *
* Valora Quinlan, '18. *
* Vice-president-Pansy Blake, *
* '18, Mildred Mighell, '18. *
* Treasurer- Anna MacMahon, *
* .'19, Olive Wiggins, '19.
* Recording Secretary - Ada *
* Arnold, '19, Mildred Reindel, '19. *
Corresponding Secretary - *
* Marguerite Chapin, '20, Laura *
* Peocock, '20. *
* Senior Director - Ielen *
Brown, '18, Clarissa Vyn, '18. *
* Junior Director-Ruth Dailey, *
* '19, Edith Duemling, '19, Ethel *
* Powers, '19, Alice Worcester, *
'19.
* Sophomore Director - Ruth *
* Jennings, '20, Winifred Jones, *
ti '20. *
* Nominations for 1917-18 of- *
* ficers of the Women's league *
* will be voted on Tuesday, April *
* 3, in the General library. *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
MICHIGAN BOAT CLUB
PICKS ]111 OFFICERS
HEINRICH CHOSEN COMMODORE;
MAY FOSTER CREW FOR
UNIVERSITY.
Finishing their campaign of "big-
ger, better and livelier boating inr-
est for the University," last year's of-.
ficers of the Michigan Boat club chose
officers Sunday for the coming canoe-
ing season.
The selection was made from a
large number of letters written by
students stating their experiences in
boating, yachting, and water sports.
The following officers were chosen:
Commodore, Kenneth W. Heinrich,
'17E, ensign of the University of
Michigan naval reserves; vice-coi-
modore, Henry A. Knowlson, '18E;
secretary, Hugh Brown, '19L, and
treasurer, Wilfred V. Casgrain, '18.
First, second, and third ensigns will
be appointed later.
Separated from the Michigan Union
last February the Boat club financed
itself and so safe-guarded the Huron
river that for the first time in- six
years no serious accidents occurred.
About 20 life stations, each contain-
ing a life preserver and rope in a
weather proof house were erected at
the most dangerous points. on the
river. In co-operation with the Michi-
gan Edison company signs were put
up at other places.
The building of a boathouse for stu-
dents of the Univesity, the develop-
ment of aquatic sports, and perhaps
the fostering of a Michigan crew will
J je ofnts of the present club officers.
' NTT OWNERSHIP TO
1SED BY ALPHA N
o A pbha Nu Debating society will
meet t 7:30 o'clock on Friday even-
ing, 1larch .23 in its rooms in Univer-
sity hall.
Julian F. Lett, '18, will speak on
"Representative Government in Russ-
ia." Charles E. Hutton, '17, will in-
troduce the resolution: "Resolved,
That the United States government
should have the power to operate and
acquire important railways to pro-
,mote the public welfare." The debate
which will follow the introduction of
this question will be thrown open to
the members of tlh-society and all vis-
itors. A vote will b taken and record-
ed at the end of the iscussion.

Washington, March 19.-The Adam-
son eight-hour law is valid. This was
the ruling of the United States su-
preme court today. Chief Justice
White read the decision, which de-
clared constitutional the law passed
under spectacular circumstances in
the closing night hours of last sum-
mer's congress session.
Chief Justice White said, "There
was an authority begotten of the pub.
lie interest" in the action of congess
The court held the law constitu-
tional by a division of six to three
Justices Pitney, Day, and Vandeventer
dissented. Besides declaring, the law
constitutional, the highest tribunal al-
lowed congress the right to legislate
wages.
Reverses Lower Court's Decision
The supreme court's decision today
is a formal reversal of the opinion o
Judge William C. Hook, Kansas City,
who held the law unconstitutional.
Justice Day read a dissenting opinion
as soon as Chief Justice White con-
eluded the majority ruling. Justice
l read a separate opinion,
giv , slightly divergent views. Jus-
tice McReynolds, while he concurred,
w not flatly in favor of the law,
bet in. a short statement conceded
cougress the wage fixing power,
Justices Pitney and Day read dis-
senting opinions. Vandeventer con-
curred with Pitney, and in part with
Day.
Managers Agree with Brotherhoods
New York, March 19.-The railway
managers' agreement with the broth-
erhoods today put into operation the
eight-hour day on a ten-hour pay
basis with pro rata for over time
meaning approximately $1,000,000 a
week added to the pay rolls of the
railroads. Thirteen million dollars
extra back pay dating from Jan. 1
when the Adamson law was to be-
come effective, will be distributed
among the 400,000 trainmen.
ORDERS SUB CHASERS
Secretary laniels Directs Navy Yard
to Lay Down 60 Bottoms
Washington, March 19.- Secretary
Daniels this afternoon directed the
New York navy yard to proceed with
the construction of 60 submarine
chasers. They will cost $30,000 each
complete except machinery. The yard
can lay down 40 at once. Delivery
will begin in from 60 to 80 days at the
rate of one every three days.
elROFES OR BRIUIM SPEAKS
TO SOUTH AFRICAN UNIO
Forty-five members of the South Af-
rican union were present Saturday
night at a meting in Lane hall when
Prof. John R. Brumm of the rhetoric
department, spoke on "Habit."
Following Professor Brumm's talk
a short musical program was givep
by R. J. McCandliss, '18, Florence B.
Paddock, '17, Lucy M. Cannon, '18,
and Miss Malette and Mr. Stevens of
the School of Music. Mr. N. C. Fet-
ter of the University Y. M. C. A. also
delivered a short address, after which
refreshments were served.
RECRUITING PARTY TO TOUR
STATE IN MARCH AND APRIL
Campaigning for recruits, a United
States navy recruiting party will visit
Monroe, Adrian, Hillsdale, Coldwater
Sturgis, Three Rivers, Cassopolis
Niles, Benton Harbor, Hartford, Bat-
tle Creek, Albion, Jackson, and Ann

Arbor during the last part of March
and the month of April. The party
will come to Ann Arbor on April 16
and will remain for four days.

Railway Managers Come
with Brotherhoods on
Working Day

to Terms
Shorter

protested, but :?t janitors under
Sehweir's direction. entered the ofice
and tore the flag down.
ProfesV McLaughhin Tialks Today
"The £rench Soldier" will be the
subject of Prof. William A. McLaugh-
lin's address -to -be., delivered at 5
.'clock thfs afternoon in Tappan hall,
as the sixth of a si es- of Cercle
Francais lectures.
Prof. McLaughlin will emphasize,
especially, the spirit of the French
soldier and how it has manifested it-
self in the present war.
Minnesota to Vote on Honor System
Minneapolis, M1tin., March 19.-The
future of the honor system at Min-
nesota is to be settled by a vote of the

Hold Examinations for Civil Service
Examinations for positions in the
United States civil service will be

student body next week. A question- held during the months of March
aire is to be submitted to those in April. For complete information
the university and on the result of garding examinations addressF
their answers hinges the non-pr ctor Newton, secretary, Seventh U. S.
method of conducting examinations. service district, Chicago, Illinois.

h and
in re-
Peter
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