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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 18, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1,

50 of 1920 Class
Held Conferences

AMERICAN SCHOLARSHIPS
ANNOUNCED IN BULLETIN

TO SPEAK TONIGHT

Freshmen Advisors Have Tried
Make Yearlings Appear
for Advice

to

TO BE GRANTED FOR STUDY
DENMARK, SWEDEN AN)
NORWAY

IN

-Only 350 literary freshmen have
held conferences with the freshmen
advisor, Prof. Calvin O. Davis and
Prof. Morris P. Tilley, so far this
year.
This is the first year that the fresh-
man advisors have had definite hours
and that the work has been so con-
centrated. The advisors have taken
every opportunity of encouraging the
1,100 yearlings of the literary col-
lege to come to them for advice. Most
of the conferences which have been
held have been on the subject of
studies, but many personal matters
have also been discussed. From now
until the end of the semester the ad-,
visors are planning to make a spe-
cialty of elections of studies for next
year, especially for those students who
are planning on taking lit-medic and
lit-law courses.
The hours of the advisors are:
Professor Tilley, 12 o'clock on Mon-
day, Wednesday, and Friday in room
208 Tappan hall, and on Tuesday and
Thursday in room 206; Professor
Davis, 11 o'clock every day except
Saturday, after the next two weeks, in
room 102 Tappan hall.
Fools ' Paradise
An AncientN ame
"If you should lead her (Juliet) into
a fools' paradise, it were a gross be-
havior."-Romeo and Juliet.
Great indeed have been the ravages
of time. Only two short centuries ago
thre greatest of English dramatic
poets gave us the picture of the mas-
culine aggressor, wooing his lady, and
beseeching her to elope with him. And
within two centuries, all has changed;
now we are presented with the pic-
ture of the stalwart youth being led
at will by his fair enchantress, even
to the depths of fudge parties and
pink teas, instigated by the one-time
innocent and unsuspecting female of
the species. Is such the present state
of affairs, and is there not still that
inherent sense of modesty found in'
the Juliets of yesterday?
Surely this is a serious question, not
to be taken lightly or decided in the
flippant mind of a mere reporter.
Such a question is worthy of our best
endeavors, worthy of mature thought
and discussion. And such it has re-
ceived, for let it be known that the
question of co-education is discussed
and forever settled in "Fools' Para-
dise."
In "The Darling of Paris," Miss
Bara plays the role of a gypsy who
later becomes the favorite dancer of
the city of Paris. Arcade, Monday and
Tuesday.-Adv. 18
For live, progressive, up-to-date ad
vertising use The Michigan Daily.

A bulletin announcing scholarships
which will be granted to American
students who wish to go abroad for
study in Denmark, Sweden, and Nor-
way has been issued by the American-
Scandinavian foundation.
The foundation offers a limited num-
ber of scholarships each year with
stipends of about $500, as well as
several other smaller aids to study.
Last year four of these scholarships
were granted. These scholarships are
not limited to students of Scandin-
avian descent, but are open to all
American students who wish to study
in any of these countries.
Applications must be made on
printed forms which may be secured
from the secretary of the foundation
at 25 West 45th street, New York
City, and must be in the seoretary's
hands by April 1. The selections are
made in May.
OFFER COURSES IN PhARMACY
PREPARING FOR STATE EXAMS
Courses in the College of Pharmacy
have been arranged for the 1917 sum-
mer session to meet the needs of drug
clerks desiring to prepare for state
board examinations, of pharmacy stu-
dents who wish to shorten the time
needed to complete their course, of
pharmacy students desiring to remove
encumbrances, of students in the Uni-
versity desiring to enter the field of
food and drug analysis, and of high
school teachers interested in the ap-
plication of chemistry and microscopy
to household affairs.
No special requirements are neces-
sary for admission to these courses.
Theory of pharmacy, manufacturing
pharmacy, pharmacopoeial, food and
drug analysis, and household science
will be offered. A copy of the sum-
mer session pharmacy bulletin may
be obtained by anyone interested by
applying at the summer session of-
fice.
CLUB TO SEND SPEAKER TO
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOLS
In order to induce more Kentuckians
to come to Michigan, members of the
Kentucky club at their banquet at
the Renellen Hospice Friday night de-
cided to arrange for a tour by a mem-
ber of the faculty through the high
schools of the Blue Grass state. It
will be recommended that Dean John
R. Effinger of the literary college be
appointed to make the trip.
Short talks were given by Dean
Effinger and Prof, William Fish Mar-
steller, in addition to informal talks
by members.
Shirts made to measure. G. H. Wild
Co., Leading Merchant Tailors. State
St. tf
Try The Daily for service.

Rev. Robert LeRoy Harris, rector
of St. Mark's church in Toledo, who
will deliver two sermons on "Man's
God" at 10:30 o'clock this morning
and 4:30 o'clock this afternoon in St.
Andrew's Episcopal church.
The regular holy communion serv-
ices will be held at 7:30 o'clock this
morning.
, * * * * * ! * * * * A
AT THE THEATERS *
* TODAY *
* *
* Majestic-Henry B. Waltall in *
* "Burning the Candle." *
* _*
* Orpheum-Fannie Ward in "Bet- *
' ty to the Rescue." *
* _ _*
*Rae--Myrtle Gonzales in "The *
* Badge of Courage." *
*
* MONDAY *
* __ .*
* iMajestc-Vaudeville, *
* *
* Arcade - Theda Bara in "The *
* Darliug of Paris." *
* _ _*
* Orpheum-Fannie Ward in "Bet- *
* ty to the Rescue." *
* --. *
* Rae- Earnest Ables in "After *
* Fire." *
* * * * * * * * * $ s s * *
AT THE MAJESTIC-TODAY
The Majestic will present a triple
bill today. The feature will be "Burn-
ing the Candle," With Henry B. Walt-
hall, the popular screen star, in the
leading role. The story is that of a
young man who, unable to withstand
the temptation of drink, loses his pos-
ition, but finally conquering his great
weakness, he stops drinking and re-
turns to his former position, every-
thing ending happily.
There will also be a scenic or trav-
elogue and another of those athletic
carnivals.
AT THE MAJESTIC-MONDAY
Starting tomorrow night the Majes-
tic theater will present a bill of vaude-
ville predominating wvith songs, music,
dances, and containing also a skit and
an athletic act.
The bill isaheaded by "The Piper,"
a twenty minute musical comedy with
Jimmy O'Neil, Frank Walmsley, and
Miss Hazel Kirk playing the principal
roles.
Jimmy Lucas, who is well known in
Ann Arbor, has again entered the
stage after two years retirement and
will give several new songs and other
new features in his act.
"The Tamer," given by Mr. and Mrs.
Charles A. Bickford, is a comedy of
domestic life which deals with the
taming of a dissatisfied wife who is
living far beyond her husband's
means. Another act is the varied bill
given by George and Lily Garden.
The last act is a trapeze perform-
ance by Miss Lupita Perea, "The
Queen of the Air," who has for the
last twb years been plying with the
Barnum and Bailey circus.

CANAL ZONE LUMNUS
WRITES OF CAP IFE
FIRST CLASS FRENCH CRUISER
ANCHORS TO SALUTE OF
AMERICAN GUNS
This is the second of a series of ar-
ticles dealing with life on the canal
zone, written for The Daily by a Mich.
igan alumnus stationed with the
United States troops at Gatun, C. Z,
Camp at Gatun, C. Z., March 5.-
(By Mail)-Jeanne d'Arc, a first class
French cruiser, arrived in Colon har-
bor Friday night, and was saluted by
the big guns at the coast defense sta-
tions and also those on the U. S. S.
Charleston. The sound of the firing
caused the inhabitants of Colon to be-
lieve that the expected war had be-
gun, and the Americans, as well as
the natives, were in a decidedly
panicky frame of mind. Finally ex-
planations were forthcoming, and then
the bravery of all concerned was for-
gotten. Officers and sailors from the
French and the United States cruisers
exchanged visits until early Sunday
morning. Men on board the Jeanne
d'Arc stated that a detachment of the
French fleet, consisting of eight ships,
was steaming around the Caribbean
just outside the three-mile limit. The
Jeanne will also have to make a daily
trip outside of United States waters
in order to comply with the now seem-
ingly forgotten international law.
Inhabitants Expect Engagements
It is supposed that the discovery of
the German submarine base in the
Gulf of Darien a few days ago is re-
sponsible for the sudden appearance
of the French cruiser and the accom-
panying detachment. Last night three
United States destroyers, cruiser, and
a mine planter went through the
locks headed for the Atlantic side.
An engagement would not surprise
the people down here who realize the
strategic importance of the canal
zone. It will undoubtedly be the
scene of the carrying out of attempts
to destroy the canal, should we finally
become engaged in the "Battle Royal"
now waging in Europe.
Battalions on "Fatigue"
About 20 years ago some one said
that "Every day in the army is like
Sunday on a farm." That remark
may have been applicable at that time,
but no one can compare the daily life
of the modern soldier to that of the
agriculturist on the day of rest. Mem-
bers of the First and Second battalions
have been on "fatigue" since last No-
vember, and still the end is not in
sight. The work consists mainly in
remodeling and painting the quarters
that have been recently vacated by
the Chinese and negro employees of
the canal zone government. Living
conditions are not ideal, but it is sur-
prising how much difference a little
paint makes in the appearance of
some of these shacks. At one time
it was thought that congress would
look favorably upon the bill to ap-
propriate a few millions to construct
modern and sanitaryquarters forthe
troops in the zone, but all hopes built
on that thought were destroyed when
the news reached here a few days
ago that that bill had failed to pass,
so the men will be forced to continue
their work of reconstruction.
Guard Double Peace Size
Only the companies on guard are
relieved from fatigue, and they are
on duty for four days every week.
Conditions are much the same as a
month ago. The guard is double its
size in peace, and employees whose
business takes them to the canal, or

in the vicinity of the locks, must be
identified before they will be passed
by the sentries on duty.
That the members of the interned
German ship crews will be sent to
Empire, C. Z., has caused much com-
ment. They will occupy quarters at
the same post that is the home of the
Fifth infantry, and whether they
will be under government surveil-
lance is- a question that the reader can
answer for himself.
TO WITHDRAW PETITION TO
RAISE WOMEN'S, TUITION FEE
It was decided by the board of di-
rectors of the Women's league yester-
day to withdraw the petition recently
made to the board of regents to in-
crease the tuition for women and
later present the two provisions of
the request separately.
MICHIGAN FOURTH AMONG
UNIVERSITIES IN WHO'S WHO
Michigan stands fourth among the
universities in the 'number of alumni
and alumnae listed in the last edition
of "Who's V~io in America."
Harvard is first with 155, Yale sec-
ond with 83, Columbia third with 52,
and Michigan has 44.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.

Raitivay len May
Lose Sympathy
Laboi'crt' Themselves Most Directly
Initeri sted in Labor Sit.
Nations
"The railway men are in grave
danger of losing public sympathy,"
aid Prof. Henry C. Adams of the
economics department last night in
sunining up the crisis in the railway
strike.
Although he thinks that the crisis
is important in national affairs, he
says that the men who are in the
movement are the most vitally con-}
cerned.
Then They Tapped
e oddler 's Top
The place was Tappan hall and the
circumstance, a history quiz.
Through the window strayed a
gentle breeze, rattling the door.
"Come in," invited the professor.
No response.
"I thought I heard tapping on the
door," observed the professor.
"Well, this is Tappan hall," con-
tributed a freshman on the back row.
Union May be Repaired by March 30
The Michigan Union dance hall will
probably be repaired by Friday,
March 30, or Par enough along so that
the B1. 1. D. dance to be given by the
Barristers, Vulcans, and Druids on
that date, may be held in the redec-
orated building.
Try The Daily for service.

9 . 1.

SUNDAY SERVICES
AlN NAROR CHI

It,

II

Unitarian Church
Sermon at 10:30 o'clock, "The
Theological Christ of Paul."
First Congregational Church
Services at 10:30 o'clock, Mr.
Douglas delivering the second of a
series of sermons on "Mammon's
Markets," the subject being "The Pin-
nacle of the Temple." Dr. T. M. Iden
will speak before the Plymouth
Round Table at 6:45 o'clock.
Presbyterian Church
Morning services at 10:30 o'clock.
Subject of the sermon, "How to Make
Jesus Christ Real?"
Bethel A. M. E. Church
Preaching at 10:30 o'clock, subject,
"The Tears of Jesus."
First M. E. Church
Morning worship at 10:30 o'clock,
Broadway M. E. Church
Evening services at 7:40 o'clock.
Trinity English Luthern
Morning sermon at 10:30 o'clock,
subject of sermon, "The Promise of
the Rainbow."
St. Andrew's Church
Holy communion at 7:30 o'clock.
First Baptist Church-
Morning worship at 10:45 o'cloclk
at which Dr. W. P. Behan of Chicagc
will preach on the "Call of the Hour.'
Community Chapel
Community meeting at 7:30 o'clock
Zion Evangelical Luthern Church
English services at 8:30 o'clock.
Bethleham Evangelical Church
German services at 10:45 o'clock.
St. Paul's Evangelical Luthern Churel
Reformation services at 10:30
o'clock.

- H1LEW ERL F EETQ17E f0
- 0-i11 First Na#ionl iBank Bldg. Phone 1821.
BEFORE BUYING A HOME LET US SilOW YOU A LIST OF SOME
OF THE FINEST HOMES IN ANN ARBOR
7 Rms. hous-e on S. State, s utlful home ...................$8,000.00
7 Rms. brick house, all mofn, Martin Place...... .... ..$5,700,00
6 Rms. splendid new house, Woodlawn ...............I.......$5,100.00
6 Rms. brand new, lot 43x142, garage, Olivia St...........$5,000.00
8 Rms. new, oak finish. 1st and 2nd floors, Forest Ave.....$7,500.00
WATCH OUR ADS IN THE DAILY FOR
THE BEST BUYS IN THE CITY
-gip-igig
FOR EVERY OCCASION
Members of Florist Telegraphic Association

A SAFE' INVESTMENT
IN YOUR HOME TOWN
RLACKME.R POSITIVE PUMPS
WILL BE MADE IN ANN ARBOR
So every stockholder can always know what is going on. 'these pumps are not new
or experimental, having been made and sold several years. he demand is so great
we are obliged to build a large factory. Nearly zoo representative business men and
members of the University faculty have subscribed to our stock to secure this enter-
prise for Ann Arbor. Only a limited amount remains to be subscribed. You should
.ct promptly if you wish for one of the best investments in Michigan. A look at
the vump will show you why we nmake very large profits.
PUMPS IN OPERATION FROM g A. M. TO 8:3o P. M.
AT 221 EAST LIBERTY STREET, NEAR FIFTH AVENUE
SPRAGUE-BLACKMER ENGINEERING CO.

A 1D
can be quick
trouble, on an
Elec
This handsom
source of bot
Just the thin
Cooks prattic
-makes tooth
messing. Juf

Il11t11 11 llilllllEllililEt1llil I II11111111lllll11111111 I=
elicious Lunch
1y prepared, and without the slightest
tfiC Chafing Dish
e and very convenient table utensil is a
h comfort and pride to the housewife.
ig for a hasty lunch or Sunday supper. c
cally any dish you have a desire for c
isome fudge. No trouble; no alcohol; no -
st attach to a lamp-socket.
Come in and inspect them.

The Kodak Florist
Nickels Arcade Phone 600
1857-Dry Goods, Furniture and Women's Fashions-1917
e Cream Sherbets
and Pastries for Union Opera
isd House Parties
r Fraternities and house clubs are invited to make use of
R the Tea Room's Pastry Service in obtaining ice creams, sher-
bets, punches, pastries and other delicacies for Opera-Week
festivities.
Everything is made to order in our own kitchens of in-
gredients that are fresh, pure and of highest quality,
Here are some of the prices:
French Ice Cream, any flavor, 50c a quart,

AT THE ARCADE

In "The Darling of Paris," which
will be shown at the Arcade tomorrow
and Tuesday, Theda Bara plays a
role quite different from her usual
vampire part. As Esmeralda, the
blithe and winsome French dancer,
Theda Bara is clever. The play is
hased upon Victor Hugo's 'Thej Hunch-
back of Notre Dame." This costly
play is Miss Bara's first Fox special
production.
To Talk to Cercle Francais Tuesday
Prof. William A. McLaughlin of the
French department will address the
Cercle Francais at 5 o'clock next
Tuesday in Tappan hall. His talk will
be on the modern French soldier.
The lecture is open to the campus.

Fruit Ice Cream, any flavor, We1 a quart.
Sherbet, any flavor, 45c a quart.
Punch, any flavor, $1.00 a gallon up.
Fancy Sandwiches, $1.20 a dozen up.
Fancy Salads, 25c up.
Viennese Pastries, 60c a dozen up.
Mixed French PastrieĀ§, 10c each.
Tarts and Cakes, 60c each up.

U

II

The Detroit Edison Co.

Call
ered in

personally or by telephone. Your order will be deliv-
perfect condition, exactly when you want it.
(Second Floor Annex)

Cor. Main and William Sts.

Tel. 2300

uILzzzzw

_.. I..

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