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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 11, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I vi .4AYI %-I I I.A £~ .~

THE PAPERS SAY
ING TO THE SCARCITY OF DYES AND THE EM-
RGO ON WOOL, THERE IS GOING TO BE A SHORT-
AGE OF GOOD WOOLENS FOR MEN'S CLOTHES.
This is true, BUT our showing for Fall and Winter
does not evidence it. We have the best assortment of
all wool fabrics for men's Suits and Overcoats that we
have ever displayed-and at prices within reach of all.
Our $25.00 line will be a pleasant surprise to you.
What is even more vital to you is, that in this entire
line of over five hundred weaves there is nothing but
all-wool fabrics. These, when hand tailored to your
individual measure, will give you ioo cents value for
every dollar expended.

i. ,

1 "NMDO N

719 N.Unaiversty

'

THE ONE PHOTOGRAPHER
Who delivers the Goods and has
been delivering them for 12 years
right here among Michigan Students

ehin's

NEW MANAGEMENT

- -r

Kodaks
and
sixpplII.s

ONaranteed
Armateur
Finishing ~
G A R ROc IK .
DETROIT

TEXT BOOKS and SUPPLIES

FOR ALL COURSES

J. K. MALCOLM

E. Liberty St.

Malcolm Block

Phone 1713-M

E R VICE
is our utmost desire to render as complete a service as pos-
)le. Not only do we intend to please you with our merch-
dise-but we will make every effort possible to see that you are
rved in the most courteous manner possible.

Women's and Children's Apparel

.+ ."- 1
;_
,ayFy
4" _
t '".. J"' 7X'W. b' l
i g

'HUGHES FOR PRESIDENT'
CAPAINOPENS MONAY
W. D. Lewis, Dean of Pennsylvania
Law Sehool, to Deliver First
Address.
Student Republicans will open their
"Hughes for President" campaign
when William Draper Lewis, dean of
the University of Pennsylvania law
school, addresses them at their first
meeting at the Union next Monday
night at 7:30 o'clock.
Mr. Lewis was formerly a Progres-
sive and is a close, personal friend of
Mr. Hughes. He is an orator of ex-
ceptional ability, and at the present
time is taking the stump for Hughes.
This will be his only stop in Michi-
gan and the University of Michigan
Republican club counts itself fortunate
in having a man of Mr. Lewis' posi-
tion honor them with a visit.
The time of Mr. Lewis' arrival will.
be announced later and it is planned
to have a delegation of prominent lo-
cal Republicans and students meet
him at the depot. Later a reception
will be held at his hotel.
The Washtenaw County Republicans
meet next Monday evening and an at-
tempt will be made to have them ap-
pear at the Union in time to hear Mr.
Lewis' address. The meeting at the
Union is not confined to students but
is open to all local residents.
The student organization plans to
hold several meetings before election
day and other prominent speakers are,
expected to address them. The club
was formed last May. Peter A. Mil-
ler, '17L, is the president.

ALONE AT LAST
A R CA D E
Shows at 3:00 6:30 8:00,9:30

I

EVERY STUDENT NECESSITY

i

I. P. NOTE BOOKS
FOUNTAIN ENS
DRAW ING INSTR UMENTS

roc Unless Otherwise Specified.
Phone 296-M.
Tue.-ro-Virginia Pearson in "Daredevil
Date"; Mutt & Jeff' Cartoon.
Wed.-iI-House Peters and Ga'l Kane in
"The Velvet Paw"; Mutt, &Jeff Car-
toon. xsc.
Thu.-Lionel Barrymore i "Te Quit-
ter" and Billie Burke in Gloria's Ro
mance" (2nd Chap. "Caught by the
Seminoles"). irc.

n

f
1

Mat.
Wad. &Sat.

Orpheum Theatre'
Matinees, 2:00 3:30 Evening,6:45
8 ::4.:45

Real Values in Second-Hand Books

Phone 273

200 E. Washington St.

I

TO THE HEADQUARTERS FOR

-5-

When you buy a
shoe you have it fitted
and you take it because
it looks well and feels _
comfortable.
But a careful selec-
tion of your corset isw
much more important.
You must feel com-
fortable - and yourT
corset must form a
fashionable smooth -
base for your gown.
Back Lace Front Lace
are designed with in-
finite care for every
type of figure, and nat-
urally the best of fa-
brics, boning and other
materials is used in their
design, for they are
high class corsets.
But a Redfern is not
an indulgence. It is a
healthful safeguard.
You will find it all you
expect the best corset to
be-comfortable, fash-
ionable and serviceable.
From Three Dollars Up
FOR SALE BY

MANY OPENINGS FOR MEN
AS ASSISTANT MANAGERS
Athletic Departments Need Try Outs
for Positions; Appointments
on Competitive Basis.
It is being complained by the vari-
ous managers of the several branches
of university athletics that men are
not coming out to compete for posi-
tions as assistant managers. There
are five such departments of athletics,
football, baseball, track, intercollege,
and interscholastic:
Of these five departments football
has no complaint to make. Sixteen
men are out for berths there. Base-
ball has as yet issued no call and
neither has the interscholastic man-
ager.
In the last two, a call has been is-
sued in track and 16 men are wanted
to try out for the positions, and as
yet only four have answered and re-
ported for work. All men who wish
to report may do so to the varsity track
manager at the athletic offices between
the hours of two and three, or call
'phone 343.
The intercollege manager has called
for try-outs, desiring 16, but only one
has answered thus far. On such a
basis no efficiency can be obtained in
conducting the department. The ap-
pointments will be made on la purely
competitive basis and whether a man
receives an appointment or not de-
pends upon whether he gets out early
in the season and works.
JOBS UNFILLED AT UNION
Employment Bureau Has Many Posi-
tions Waiting for Applicants.
Waiters are wanted at the Union
and there are a lot of temporary jobs
for everybody.
T. S. Cox, '17, chairman of the Michi-
gan Union employment bureau, ex-
plained yesterday that many odd jobs
are on file at the Union's office wait-
ing for applicants. These include
temporaryaand permanent work.
There are several jobs at furnace tend-
ing which will keep several students:
busy the entire winter.
When large dinner§ are given at
the Union there is always a demand
for waiters. Work for a couple of
hours nets good pay and the Union
is anxious to have aZst of men will-
Sng to work on these occasions.
One of the troubles the Union has
experienced in running its employ-
ment bureau this year is the fact that
the men do not report whether they
have accepted the jobs given out or
not. This difficulty will be studied
and a suitable system will be pro-
vided in the future.

Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Wed.-Ji-Wni.23. Crane in David Ha-
umn." Rebooked.
Thnr.-Fri.-Marguerite Clark in "Little
Lady Eileen." Also Bray Cartoons.
Eve. z5c.
Sat. -Bessie Barriscale in The Pay-
meat." Also Triangle Comedy, Nay
Tincher in "Skirts." Eve 15e
Goo d h e w
FLORAL CO.
Flowers for all occasions.
A full line of plant and cut
iower baskets.

Students electrical supplies
Study lamps, shades, extension cords, heating de-
vices and everything electrical.
Repair. Work Given Prompt Attention
Washtenaw Electric Shop
"THE SHOP OF-QUALITY"

11,

If it is not right, we make it right

..®

Store Phone
Greenhouse
225 E. Liberty

1321
170 M
Darling Bldg.

That's what they all say!

AVERAGE STUDENT IN INDIA
SPENDS BUT $12 A MONTH
Only five million dollars yearly com-
prises the total expenditure for edu-
cation for India's 315 millions of popu-
lation. There are only 15 colleges in
the whole country and the average ex-
penses of a student during the col-
lege year are $12 per month, while the
college graduate earns only $13 per
month, even in the government serv-
ice.
These and other equally startling
statements were made by Dr. N. A.
Hardikar, assistant in hygiene, at a
banquet given last night by the five
Hindu students of the University to
President Harry B. Hut~hins, Dean V.
C. Vaughan, Prof. J. A. C. Hildner,
and Rev. R. S. Loring.

A

L A U G H !
Thought
I' Die!!!
-AT-,
IMHOF, CONN and
COREEN.E
-IN-
"THE PEST HOUSE"
S j Majestic
Some Show That's All

WHAT'S GOING ON
Today.
1:00 to 3:00 o'clock-Sophomores
wishing to tryout for manager of the
Glee and Mandolin club report to room
2161 N. S. building.
2:00 o'clock-John M. Zane delivers
second lecture on "Attaint of the
Jury," room C law building.
3:15 o'clock-Band meets in front of
U-hall for Carroll college game.
4:05 o'clock-Carroll college foot-
ball game, Ferry field.
4:15 o'clock-Faculty concert, Hill
auditorium.
6:00 o'clock-Tau Beta Pi dinner,
Michigan Union.
7:30 o'clock-Forestry club meets,
room 214 science building.
7:30 o'clock-Mortar Board meets,
Theta Phi Alpha house.
Tomorrow.
1:00 o'clock-Sophomore pharmic
class meeting, room 303 chemistry
building.
1:30 o'clock-Junior pharmic class
meeting, room 300 chemistry building
3:30 o'clock -Presbyterian girls
meet in new club room at McMillan
hall.
4:00 o'clock-Dean Henry M. Bates
talks to fresh laws, room C law build-
ing.
4:00 o'clock-.John M.. Zane gives
third lecture, law building.
4:00 o'clock-Comedy club meets,
Cercle Francais rooms.
7:45 o'clock-Students interested in
military training meet at Union.

J. M. ZANE, '84, GIVES FIRST OF
LECTURES TO LAW STUDENTS
Tracing the history of the develop-1
ment of the present jury system and
telling of the first case of re-trial, in
1072, which led to the modern pro-
cedure of appeal and re-trial, John M.
Zane, '84 law, prominent menber
of the Chicago bar, gave the first
of three lectures on "The Attaint of
the Jury" in room C law building, yes-
terday afternoon. Mr. Zane is well
known by Michigan law students. He
followed the development of the jury
from the earliest times, when the
junors were eye-witnesses of the case
at court, to the present day. Two
more lectures on the same subject will
be delivered by Mr. Zane, one this
afternoon and one tomorrow after-
noon.
WILSON SENTIMENT STRONG
AMONG DETROIT WORKINGMEN
Detroit, Oct. 10.-A straw vote taken
among the workers at the big in-
dustrial plants here today show a big
lead for President Wilson over Mr.
Hughes for the presidency. Of over
1,800 votes cast, almost 1,100 were in
favor of Mr. Wilson. Of these 1,100
votes, at least 500 are estimated to be
ballots ordinarily Republican, this be-
ing approximately the number that
voted for Wilson and also for Marx,
the Republican mayoralty candidate.
Prohibition and home rule, the two
issues before the people of Michigan
this fall, ran slightly behind in the re-
sults of yesterday's straw vote.

pp

SCANDINAVIAN VESSELS IN
COLLISION; SUBMARINE SUNK
Copenhagen; Oct. 10.-=-The Danish
submarine Dykkeren was Sunk today
in collision with a Norwegian steamer.
The crew of the submersible is be-
lieved to have been saved.
The Dykkeren was of 132 tons gross
and 114 feet long. It was driven by
three screws and had a speed of 11
knots on the surface. Ordinarily it
carried a complement of nine men.
Former Student Fined for Speeding
E. A. Gallup, who was enrolled in
the University last year as a graduate
student, was caught speeding at 30
miles per hour on South State street
Monday afternoon. Officer Emil Sodt
hailed him before Justice William G.
Doty, who fined him $10 and $3.45
costs.
Refugees Tell of Austrian Naval Loss
Paris, Oct. 10.-One of the largest"
Austrian warships blew up recently at
Pola, according to a press dispatch
from Zurich. The dispatch says ref-
ugees from Dalmatia brought the news
to Switzerland, but they did not know
the cause of the explosion.
Danish Laborers Favor Sale
St.. Thomas, D. W. I., Oct. 10.-The
sale of the Danish West Indies by Den-
mark to the United States was unani-
mously favored by acclamation at ai
meeting held here yesterday attended1
chiefly by working men-laborers and
artisans.

To learn y ~ w e4 y
roquires close &pplieat 0
instru tion bo_ r
will do the re .
$15,000 Cost of Plumbers'Conviction
Salt Lake, Utah, Oct. 10.-The
United States government, according
to officials here, spent $15,000 in con-
victing Utah master plumbers of vio-
lating the Sherman anti-trust laws.
A total of $6,500 in fines was assessed
against the convicted master plumb-
ers today by Judge Tillman D. John-
son, of the United States district
court.
$18,000 Left for Needy Students
Ithaca; N. Y., Oct. 10.-According to
the will of Charles E. Green of
Schuylerville, a sum of approximately
$18,000 is provided for the purpose of
assisting needy students at Cornell
university. The will, which was pro-
bated recently, provides that the legacy
shall be paid at the death of Mrs.
Green, who survives her husband.
Drys Denied Court Yard for Meeting
Peoria, Ill., Oct. 10.-Prohibition na-
tional campaigners found on their ar-
rival here tonight that the use of the
courthouse yards had been denied
them for a meeting because, it was
said, it was not intended to be used
for political purposes, so they ad-
journed to a church and proceeded to
flay the liquor interests.
Oil Stove Causes Fire on Jefferson
Firemen were hastily summoned to
the home of Mrs. Susan M. Spense at
513 E. Jefferson St., about 7:15 o'clock
last night in answer to an alarm of
fire. A recently installed oil stove
proved to be the cause of the confla-
gration which was quickly ex-
tinguished. No damage was done.
Raid Bucharest at Night and Day
Amsterdam, Oct. 10, via London.-
According to information received by
the Roumanian legation at The Hague,
250 persons of whom 200 were women
have been killed or wounded by Ger-
man aircraft in bombardments of
Bucharest. These attacks continue by
day and night.
Stop in at "The Little Shop"' after
the concert Thursday night. oct11
Leave your film at the Delta.
oct3 to 29
Does your musical instrument need
repairs? Take it to Schaeberle & Son,
110 South Main street, for first-class

1 600 for expert typewriting.
oct3 to 29
odward rents typewriters. 8-9 A.
v. Bnk. Bldg. Tel. 866-F1.

U-Notices. .
Student Masons will hold their first
meeting of the year at 7:30 o'clock
tonight at the Union. Prominent Ma-
sons from both the city and campus
will give addresses, and refreshments,
smokes, and music will be on the pro-
gram. All student Masons are invited
to attend.
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
School will not talk to the fresh laws
this afternoon, but the time of his talk
has been changed to.tomorrow at 4:00
o'clock in room C law building.
All men who wish to try out for
varsity cheer leaders are requested
to report to Gordon Smith at 3:30
o'clock this afternoon at the Ferry
field clubhouse.
Nominations for officers of the senior
engineers will be made at a class
meeting to be held in room 348 en-
gineering building at 7:00 o'clock to-
night.
Professor Roth will speak at the
first ' meeting of the forestry depart-
ment this year. The meeting will be
held tonight in room 214 science build-
ing and all are invited, including
freshmen.

LIBERTY AT 606
D. E. GRENNAN
Custom Tail ring

Riding
Breeches

LIBERTY AT 606

work.

oct3tl

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