100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 17, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


VA I

I

I

SPRING
SHOWING

Calkins

T might pay you to talk
with us about exchanging
your old Kodak for a new
.model or one with a better

Drug

Cordovan s
We have just received
another shipment of
this popular shoe, in
BLACK and TAN.
Special Agency Nettleton shoes

Co.

lens.

308 So. Stat.

or 1123 So. Univ. Ave.

of the new

Revolutionary Movement in Russia
Vegan During Reign of Nicholas II

J)t f _ otches

WAHR'S Shoe Stores
M aIz St. State St.

$20 to $40

Lindenschmidt Apfel Co.

L

At Fourth Ave. and Liberty St.
Laboratory Supplies

Chemicals

- Drugs - Toilet Articles
and Drug Sundries

The Eberbach & Son Co.

What about that

New

Suit for Spring

We have some beauties at $20,$22.50 and $25
made to your measure by the Royal Tailors of
Chicago.
Drop in and look them over whether 'it be a
New or Staple Pattern we have it.

Camt pus Bootery
308 S. State St. Opposite Huston's
Bostonian and Florsheim Shoes
(NEW SPRING STYLES)
One of Our Dinners

Several weeks ago Samuel Bar-
mak, '19, who came to America
from Mohilev-on-Dniester in the
province of Podola, Russia, three
years ago, wrote a series of ar.
ticles on his native land for The
Michigan Daily. While these ar-
ticles were written without any
knowledge of the revolution that
has just taken place in Russia,
they are prophetic of the present
situation. The first article ap-
pears this morning.
The first serious revolutionary
movement took place during the
reign of Nicholas I. A conspiracy
with the purpose of extorting a con-
stitution from the czar was discov-
ered. Most of the conspirators were
members of the aristocratic class,
many of them being nobles, and
others high government officials.
They were all ruthlessly punished. A
number of them were executed dur-
ing the beautiful "white nights" of
Petrograd, the rest were deported to
Siberia for a life term. This is known
in Russia as the "affair of the De-
cembrists." It occurred in Decem-
ber, 1825.
Under Alexander II opposition to
autocratic form of government was
becoming intense. The people under-
stood that the ruler would not cur-
tail his unlimited power unless com-
pelled to do so. They began to pre-
pare to vindicate their right of par-
ticipating in the government by pre-
paring for revolution. Numerous or-
ganizations were being established
with the purpose of conducting propa-
ganda among peasants and soldiers.
Proclamations were being widely
distributed, their contents were stim-
ulating the intellectuals and enlight-
ening the,,peasantry and workmen on
the evils of autocratic government.
Several unsuccessful attempts to as-
sassinate the czar and to combat the
governing party while it was without
a ruler, were made.
Instigators Original
In some of these attempts the in-
stigators proceeded in an original
manner. The description of which
may be of some interest to the reader.
One of the royal employees, a furni-
ture polisher, was a revolutionist. His
lodging was in the basement of the
palace, in .which he gradually ac-
cumulated a quantity of dynamite.
Having located the royal dining
room he exploded the charge at the
time when it was the czar's custom to
dine. A terrific explqsion took place.
As the czar had a guest on that day
the dinner had been postponed and
no one was injured. The would-be
assassin escaped. He was later ar-
rested in connection with another rev-
olutionary affair, identified, and exe-
cuted.
Make Another Attempt
Another attempt was made in the
following manner:
The czar was to return to Petro-
grad from a certain city. In a vil-
lage near the part of the railroad
which was unavoidably to be passed
by the royal train the attemptors
hired a house from which they be-
gan to dig a tunnel to the railway.
The work had been begun a few
months before the time when the
czar was to go to Petrograd. This
hard and dangerous undertaking was
finally completed. The electric wires
ran from the house to the railway
through the tunnel. Dynamite stored
beneath the railway was to be ex-
ploded by this arrangement.
In order to prevent the success of
any attempt upon the life of the czar,
the royal train is usually preceeded
by one train and followed by two
others. When the second train, which

the would-be assassins thought car-
ried the czar, drew near, the current
was turned on. An explosion oc-

curred which shattered the train.
Great was the disappointment of the
attemptors when they learned that
the czar was in the first train.
Assassinate Alexander II
Alexander II was assassinated in
1881. This, according to the agree-
ment of the revolutionists, was to be
a signal for revolution. Revolution
indeed did break out at many places,
but was quickly suppressed by Alex-
ander III, who succeeded.
A scheme for a Russian constitution
was found in Alexander II's office.
Certain books claim that he was
killed by Royalists who were to lose
much if Russia should become less
autocratic. These royalists played a
conspicuous role during the reign of
Alexander I, grandfather of Alexander
II.
Alexander I was noted for his lib-
eral ideas. It is known that he con-
templated drawing up a Russian con-
stitution but was prevented by court-
iers from carrying out his plans. It
is also claimed that Nicholas II, the
present czar, is of a mild disposition
and undecisive character, and that
were it not for the reactionary min-
isters and influential and selfish
courtiers the Russian nation would
have enjoyed more liberty.
EASTERN EDUCATORS TO
LECTURE AIT INSTITUTE
NOTED MEN WILL CONFER WITH
STATE TEACHERS ON
MARCH 27 AND 28
Dr. Paul H. Hanus, professor of his-
tory and the art of teaching in Har-
vard university, and Dr.Leonard P.
Ayres, director of the division of ed-
ucation of the Russell Sage founda-
tion, New York City, will be the speak-
ers at a short-term state institute to
be held in Ann Arbor on March 27, 28,
and 29, under the joint auspices of the
state department of public instruction
and the department of education of
the University of Michigan.
Professor Hanus in six lectures will
deal largely with the problems of the
superintendent, taking up the super-
intendent's supervising and education-
al policies, his report, and the ques-
tion of industrial, education prior to
and accompanying employment.
Dr. Ayres will treat especially the
teacher's side of school work, talking
on the measurement of reading abili-
ity and achievement in handwriting,
school surveying -ventilation, the basis
for industrial education, and educa-
tion made definite.
In addition to their lectures, each
of the speakers will hold conferences
on March 27 and 28; Professor Hanus
at 11 o'clock and Dr. Ayres at 4
o'clock.
In connection with this institute
there will be a dinner at 6 o'clock on
March 28 at the Michigan Union for
high school principals and all those
interested in secondary school pro-
blems. Tickets can be secured from
Principal H. R. Atkinson of Battle
Creek.
DEUTSCHER VEREIN MEN TO
HOLD GET-TOGETHER TUESDAY
Deutscher Verein men will hold a
get-together meeting next Tuesday
evening in Lane hall. Prof. Tobias
J. C. Diekhoff and Prof. Carl E. Eg-
gert have been secured as the speak-
ers for the occasion. Refreshments
will be served.
William T. Adams, '17, Lawrence L.
Goldsmith, '19, and Philip F. Leslie,
'18, comprise the committee.

"A Laugh in Every Scene"-Charlie
Chaplin in "Easy Street." Arcade
today.

I

r
NUMEROUS COURSES IN
1917 SUMMER SESSION
PHILOSOPHY, PSYCHOLOGY, AND
DENTAL REQUISITES TO
BE OFFERED
According to an announcement by
the dean of the summer session, the
subjects of philosophy and psych6l-
ogy will be covered by numerous
courses in the 1917 summer session
and that all the courses required in
dentistry which are taught in the lit-
erary college or the Medical school
will be offered.
These courses In dentistry are given
to enable students in the dental col-
lege to take all these required studies
in summer school which for some rea-
son they have been unable to carry
during the academic session:
Due to the interest manifested in
the courses of philosophy and psych-
ology, a large number of these courses
will be offered this summer. Prof.
Robert M. Wenley, head of the de-
partment of philosophy in the Uni-
versity and an authority oi philosophy
of religion, will offer this course dur-
ing the summer session and also a
teachers' course in ethics. Professors
C. B. Vibbert, R. W. Sellars, and D.
H. Parker will offer introductory
courses in philosophy, logic, and
ethics and present-day tendeicies in
philosophy and aesthetics.
Prof. W. B. Pillsbury and Dr. Henry
Foster Adams will offer the follow-
ing courses in psychology: Elementry
psychology, experimental psychology
and psychology of advertising.
fENGINEERS TO JOURNEY
WESTWARD ON 117 TRIP
STUDENTS DENIED ADMISSION
TO PENNSYLVANIA NAVY
YARDS
"Westward Ho!" will be the slogan
of the engineers on their spring trip
this year. This decision was reached
after an answer had been received
from the Philadelphia navy yard to a
letter sent by Prof. John E. Emswil-
er, saying that admission to their
yards could not be granted.
Those going on the trip will leave
Ann Arbor Friday night, April 6, and
will go directly to Gary where a day
will be spent. The engineers will stay
three days in Chicago, one in Mil-
waukee, one in Keokuk, three in St.
Louis, and one in Toledo, the students
returning Monday night, April 16.
The following industries will be
visited: The United States Steel com-
pany at Gary, the Commonwealth-Edi-
son and the Western Electric com-
panies at Chicago, the Cutler Hammer
company at Milwaukee, the Missis-
sippi river dam at Keokuk the Wag-

A SAFE INVESTMENT
IN YOUR HOME TOWN
BLACKMER POSITIVE PUMPS
WILL BE MADE IN ANN ARBOR
So every stockholder can always know what is going on. These pumps are not new
or experimental, having been made and sold several years. The demand is so great
we are obliged to build a large factory. Nearly ioo representative business men andi
members of the University faculty have subscribed to our stock to secure this enter-
prise for Ann Arbor. Only a limited amount remains to be subscribed. You should
act promptly if you wish for one of the best investments in Michigan. A look at
the pump will show you why we make very large profits.
PUMPS IN OPERATION FROM g A. M. TO 8:30 P. M.
ATP2U1 EAST LIBERTY STREET, NEAR FIFTH AVENUE
SPRAGUE -BLACKMER ENGINEERING CO.

Fitform Clothes

U,

I

First Showing

Of

I

Spring Clothes'

We are showing the
nobbiest line of
SPRING SUITS

and
TOP COATS

Served from 11 to 7
Regular Dinner 35a consists choice of
meats; mashed or boiled potatoes; one
vegetable; choice of pie or pudding; tea,
coffee, or milk.
SPECIALS, as served
Soup .Io with meat order .05
Roast or Fricassee of chicken .25
Roast Prime Ribs of Beef .25
Roast Leg of Veal with Dressing .25
Pork Sausage with Sweet Potatoes 25
Pork Chops Breaded. Extra Special .25
Small Steak with Onions. Ex. Spec'l .25
Bread and Mashed Potatoes included
with above meat orders.
Side Orders Extra
Potatoes mashed .o5 Stewed tomatoes .051
Potatoes boiled .05 Stewed corn .05
Potatoes fried .05 Stewed peas .05
Potatoes german fried .o5
Home made pies per cut .05 Rice cus-
tard .o5, with cream 1o.
Coffee .05 Tea .o5 Chocolate .05.
Milk per bottle .05 Cocoa .10
STATE
ITREET IU C
Open All ight. I. A. QUACKENBUSH, Mgr.
YPSI AND ANN ARBOR CAMP
FIRE GIRLS MEET TONIGHT
The Camp Fire girls of Ann Arbor
and Ypsilanti are to hold a joint cere-
monial meeting at 6:45 o'clock tonight

I

' eIU M '3 918
-SV IVIDNVNIl GNV
'IVOISAHd S.LI OZ SV
ZL931U0OD 9HL 30
381 TIIIM JNH..L 'LifiS
V ILOA. 3XVTV L~UVfIO
-H'v w .L3I UNYV 3G1Q
3H1. L LSdfl 'S3H1010I
'3UVP-A(IV3[1I fNI
-Afifi 30JIu V H 3H..L
NII N_ ARU 'uAVIJflOA Al.J

1';

in the city.

Also a big line of the

New
Caps,
ings.

Spring Hats,
and Furnish-

U,

in the high school gymnasium. Uni-
versity women who have been mem-

TOM CORBETT
116 E. Liberty St.
"I/g Young lMen 's Shot"

I

bers of a Camp Fire, or who are in-
terested in the work, are invited to
witness the program, which will con-
sist of a stunt by each of the Ypsi-
lanti groups and a play by the Ann
Arbor girls.
For results advertise in The Michi-
gan Daily.

Patronize Daily Advertisers.

Leave Copy Leave Copy,
at at
Quarry's and C LA I I Students'
The Delta ADVERTISING supply Store

i

ner Electric company,r
factory, and, perhaps,,
St. Louis, and the
works, a steel tube
plant in Toledo.
It isalso planned toe
ing stations, bridges,
plants in cities where
vantages along such

a Diesel engine
a coal mine at
Owens Bottle
manufacturing
visit the pump-
and filtration
exceptional ad.
lines can be

MARCH ISSUE OF GARGOYLE
DEVOTED TO UNION OPERA
Next Number to Contain Advice for
Writers of 1918 Book; Out
First of Week
Containing excellent advice for the
struggling dramatist who is attempt-
ing to write next year's opera, the
Gargoyle will make its appearance on
the campus March 21. The technique
of the plot, the method by which the
cast is chosen, and the composition
of the dialogue are all exposed.
A double page drawing entitled,
"Our Staff Artist's Impression of the
Opera," shows many little sketches of
this year's play, the old-fashioned girl,
the bald-headed row the inevitable
telephone girl and a host of other
characters.
The cover is by Reed Bachman, '20,
the winner of the opera poster con-
test. It is in two colors, a deep blue
and black.
For live, progressive, up-to-date ad-
vertising use The Michigan Daily.

I i

i.

WANTED

LOST.

WANTED-The opportunity of getting
what you want is knocking at your
door. Answer it by a want-ad in
The Daily.
WANTED-If you are in need of any-
thing, The Michigan Daily's Class-
fled department can help you get it.
WANTED-Lady for educational work
in Saginaw, this summer. $240.
Phone 359-M. 15-6-7

LOST:A fountain pen, Waterman self-
filler with two gold bands and bar-
rel. Finder call 1547-R and recieve
reward. V. F. Gornall. 17-8
MISCELLANEOUS
THE RUBY GARAGE has 3 features
worth while-fire proof, ease ofacon-
struction, reasonable price. Call for
T. W. Peck, Phone 2361-W. 15-7

II

Our Great Co-operative Sale of
Pianos and Player Pianos
Will save you Money
Beautiful New Grand Pianos
$460.00 Time Payment
Grinnell Bros.,

found. All the students will not visit
all the factories but dill be divided
up so that the mechanicals will visit
the places of interest to them and
the electricals and civ ils doing the
same.
Use the advertising colunns of The
Michigan Daily in order to reach the
best of AgnArbor's buyers.

116 S. Main St.

Phone 1707

R.:

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan