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March 17, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-17

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THE WEATHER
WARN A-NID PROB-
ABLE RI

, i an

4:1 cjttUNITE]
I DAY AN
~aitgWIRE

ID PRESS
.D NIGHT
SE.RVICE

VOL. XXVI. No. 117. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENT

WILON

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VOIDED"

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ANN OUNCE

RUSSIAN UUMA PLANS TO TRANSFORM
MONARCHY INTO MODERN DEMOCRAcY;
GIVES PEOPLE VOICE IN GOVERNMENT
COMPLETE ORDER TO BE RESTORED THROUGHOUT COUNTRY
ERIOR TO HOLDING GENERAL ELECTIONS; DE-
SIRE OPINION OF MASSES
GRE 4T STORES OF FOOD STUFFS CONCEALED
IN VARIOUS PARTS OF CITY OF PETROGRAD

Nobles of Empire Hold Meetings to Pledge Support to New Order;
and Populace Join in Hunt to Arrest Policemen; Em-
press and Czarvitch Reported Ill

Soldiers I

GETTING BEHIND THE PRESIDENT
s x
I r -
?JJD~'rT 9 ____
WOULD MICHIGAN BE READY??

PRESIDENT NAMES COMMISSION TO
MEET RAILROAD REPRESENTATIVES
IN FINAL MOVE TO AVERT TIE-UP
MAKES PERSONAL APPEAL TO MEMBERS OF BROTHERHOOD AN)
RAILROAD MANAGERS TO CO-OPERATE FOR
SAFETY OF COUNTRY
SECRETARIES LANE AND WILSON, WITH SAMUEL
GOMPERS AND DANIEL WILLARD, APPOINTEES
Reports from New York Indicate That Railway Managers' Representa-
tives and Brotherhood Chiefs Will Meet in Joint Ses-
sion with Mediators

t

Petrograd, March 16.-A government to be based upon universal suf-
frage and equal voice of the people in its administration, has succeeded
the reign of the most despotic of modern sovereigns. The executive com-
mittee of the duma which today began its task of transforming the most
absolute of monarchies into a modern democracy, announced it would first
restore complete order throughout the empire prior to holding general
elections. These general elections will give all of the people an op-
portunity to voice their opinion as to the form of government and the
personnel of the officials who will control it.
Order was gradually being restored today throughout Russia. The
empress was reported to be suffering from a hysterical attack. The
czarvitch was ill. Prices for provis-
ions kept up to an extortionate level rranza 's Power
by duplicity of ministersand grafting
underlings of the old government, de- A ain i reaiionnA
creased enormously today. Great
stores of food stuffs were found con-
cealed in various parts of the city, Troops in Chihuahua and Sonora Are
the same sort of food stuffs which Reported in Open Revolt
the former ministers asserted had be- ,Ag iist President
come exhausted.
New Government Gains Power El Paso, Tex., March 16.-The pow-
The new government through the er of the Carranza government in the
executive committee of the duma is northern states of Mexico is again
rapidly gaining strength from all seriously threatened, according to re-
classes. Nobles of the- empire wereo
today reported meeting in various ports reaching United States govern-
places, and pledging support to the ment agents and American mining
new order. One of the curious re- men here today. These reports de-
sults of the revolution, apparent to- clare that all the Carranza troops in
day, was the soldiers and the popu- the states of Chihuahua and Sonora,
lace joining in a hunt to arrest po- who are loyal to Obergon, until re-
licemen. Several thousand have al- cently war minister in President Car-
ready been locked up and the public ranza's cabinet, are in open revolt
is greatly enjoying the hunt for more. against the present government.

BULLETIN
Washington, March 16.-The threatened railroad strike will be avert-
ed, according to a statement issued tonight by the cabinet, which had
been in session considering extraordinary means of avoiding a national.
tie-up of railroads. Reports from; New York indicate that the deadlock
between the officials and the brotherhood will not be broken and that
President Wilson will have to adopt stringent methods in order to pre-
vent the strike.
This is taken to indicate that the president will take over the rail-
roads if necessary in order to prevent a tie-up.
Washington, March 16.-Coincident- with designating the mediatory
board, President Wilson sent a personal appeal to members of the rail-
road brotherhoods and railroad managers' committee, for co-operation
in the best interests of the country. The appeal reads:
I deem it my duty and my right to appeal to you in this time
of national peril to open agaifti the question at issue between
the railroads and their operatives with a veiw to accommoda-
tion or settlement. With my approval, a committee of the coun-
sel of national defense is about to seek a conference with you
with that end in view. A general interruption of the railway
traffic of the country at this time would entail a danger to the
nation against which I have the right to enter my most solemn
and earnest protest. It is now the duty of every patriotic man
to bring matters of this sort to an immediate settlement. The
safety of the country against manifest perils affecting its own
peace, and the peace of the whole world,, make accommodation
absolutely imperative, and seem to, me to render any other
choice or action inconceivable.
(Signed) WOODROW WILSON.

CORNELLOPPOSESU
VARSI.TYTONIGHTI
Both Track Squads in Crippledj
Shape for Meet; Predictions
Uncertain
BIG RED TEAM AND ROOTERS I
TO ARRIVE ,THIS MORNING

F I RIST IN CONTEST
James Schermerhorn Jr., Wins State
Peace honors at Ypsi-
lanti
EARNS RIGHT TO REPRESENT
UNIVERSITY IN SEMIFINAL

Expect Record Crowd; Michigan
Ithaca Alumni Plan to
See Meet

and I Central

Group Contestants
Ann Arbor in
April

Speak in

Berlin Speculates on Meaning
Berlin, March 16.-Berlin newspa-
per comment was profuse today ins
speculating as to 'the meaning of theI
Russian revolution. "The revolutioni
was not anti-monarchial," says the
Tageblatt, "but was anti-bureaucratic,1
aiming at unity of the people. Over-;
throw of the czar only will come if
he resists the aims of the revolution-
ary leaders. Doubtless these leadersa
are determined to continue the war to
the utmost.
King Constantine
May Lose Throne.
Russian Revolution to Be Followed by
Stronger Pressure on Greece,
Say Dispatches
Washington, March 16.-That the
Russian revolution and the victory of
the duma over the Russian bureau-
cracy may be immediately followed
by stronger pressure of the entente
allies on Greece, and perhaps the re-
moval of King Constantine from the
'Greek throne, is indicated in official
dispatches received here from repre-
sentatives of this government abroad.
Reports that carried these hints
brought also the official indication
that ,the collapse of the Turkish em-
pire is imminent, and that if such
events as are expected transpire, they
will result in complete removal of
Turkey from any influence or terri-
torial holdings in Europe.
FRESH LIT CLASS ELECTS
PRESIDENT AND TREASURER
In an election characterized by light
voting, the fresh lits yesterday chose
Donald J. Thorp as their president
and Charles B. Stegner as their treas-
urer.

'Washington, March 16.The United
States government refuses to place
any embargo on supplies or munitions
to the allies, says a note to General'
Carranza sent by the state department
this afternoon. The note is in reply
to General Carranza's note proposing
such embargoes.
Berlin, March 16.-German detach-
ments engaging in forefield actions
succeeded in capturing four officers
and more than 50 men, together with
some machine guns, on the west front,
according to today's official report
from headquarters. Frosty weather
is hampering operations in the east.
Paris, March 16.-Between the Avre
line a French detachment late last
night occupied a number of German
positions and imprisoned many, to-
day's official statement asserted.
London, March 16.-A small enemy
steamer attempting to cross the Tigris
river, was fired upon and ultimately
captured Tuesday, practically undam-
aged, today's official report from the
Messopotamian expeditionary force,
asserted. The Turkish forces are still
in retreat beyond Bagdad.
Petrograd, March 16.-"Toward Ker-
manshah we dislodged the Turks from
their fortified positions at the summit
of Naleshkian," said the official war
office statement today.
Indianapolis, March 16.-Sixhun-
dred patrol men were being sworn in
by the Indianapolis police department
this afternoon to preserve order in
case of a railroad strike tomorrow
night. The expense of the special po-
licemen will be borne by the railroad
companies.
Dean Vaughan Attends State Meet
Dean Victor C. Vaughan has left for
Lansing to attend a meeting of the
state board of health.

Michigan's track team faces Cornell
tonight not confident of victory, but
determined to fight for every point in
each event.
"The boys except Scofield are in
shape and ready," said Coacn Farrell
last night. "I will hazard no pre-
dications as. to the outcome. Such
would be foolish in view of the fact
that Cornell has had the best college
team in the country for the past twvo
years."
When told that Cornell dispatches
stated that Windnagle probably would
compete only in the half mile, Steve
showed no surprise.
"Watch this man Wenz. If anyone
thinks Eddie is going to have a run-
away in the mile, he may change his
mind when he sees this man Wenz
run."
Michigan's weakness in the hurdles
and the half mile is expected to cost
several points, possibly enough to off-
set the margin between victory and
defeat.
Cornell's team and rooters are ex-
pected to arrive sometime this morn-
ing, probably on the 9:17 o'clock
Michigan Central. About 65 students
are expected to accompany the ath-
letes.
Approximately 90 tickets for the
meet remained in the athletic offices
last night. Owing to the fact that the
association will not be allowed to ad-
mit more than 2,500 spectators, it is
(Continued on Page Six.)

James Schermerhorn Jr., '18, rep-
resenting the University of Michigan
in the annual state peace contest held
last night in Ypsilanti, won first place
with his oration, "The Course of Em-
pire." The decision was a clear-cut
one, four of the seven judges accord-
ing the Michigan contestant first hon-
ors. Edward H. Koster of Hope col-
lege, with his speech "Let Us Have
Peace," was given second place.
The next elimination contest at
which ,time the winning contestants
from the states of Ohio, Indiana, Wis-
consin, and Michigan will speak, will
be held in Ann Arbor some time in
April. The national contest will be
held in Lake Mohonk, N. Y., in May,
and the winner of the contest held in
Ann Arbor will represent the central
group of states, competing with the
winners of north Atlantic, southwest-
ern, western, and Pacific groups for
national honors.
"The Course of Empire" is a plea
for international policing system to
maintain peace among the nations of
the world. After tracing the growth
of China, Greece, Rome, and France
under Napoleon, their dependence
upon armed force for their perpetua-
tion, Schermerhorn showed that the
nations had disintegrated, and as-
serted that the dependence of any na-
tion -upon military and naval forcej
would lead to its eventual downfall.
Besides being chosen to represent
the University at the next contest,

Michigan's contestalmt was given a tes-
timonial of $50. Edward H. Koster,
the winner of second place, was
awarded $25.
BOMB EXPLOSION IN
BOSTON KILLS TWO
Missile Placed in Pem'erton Square
Courthouse During Session
of Court
Boston, March 16.-Two persons
were killed in the explosion of a
bomb placed in the tdlet of the Pem-
berton Square courthouse this after-
noon. One of those killed is believed
to have been the man who placed the
bomb. He was dressed in a khaki uni-
form. The other is believed to be a.
child. The bodies of the two persons
were so badly battered that they were
unrecognizable.
Four minutes after the explosion oc-
curred the doors were locked and no
one was allowed to depart until after
a thorough investigation had been
made. The superior court was in ses-
sion at the time, and a mad rush for
the doors followed the report of the
bomb.
EDITORIAL APPOINTMENTS TO
CREASE MADE BY LAWS
The chairman of the social commit-
tee of the senior law class announced
last night the appointment of the fol-
lowing -men to the editorial board of
' the Crease, the magazine which is
annually issued by the class on the
evening of the Crease dance: Wil-
liam L. Owen, editor-in-chief; Louis
J. Holther, Wayland H. Sanford, Har-
rison L. McCarthy, Ralph F. Gates,
A. Rodney Baxter, Francis J. Klee-
man, and Don B. McCloud.
THREE WOMEN ELECTED TO
STYLUS HONORARY SOCIETY
'.
Isabel Snelgrove, grad., Lucile
Quarry, '18, and Mildred Mighell, '18,
have been elected to Stylus, women's
honorary literary society.

By Robert J. Bender
(United Press' Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, March 16.-The gov-
ernment has acted in an effort to pre-
vent the progressive nation-wide rail-
road strike scheduled to start at 6
o'clock tomorrow evening.
Secretary of the Interior Lane, Sec-
retary of Labor Wilson, Samuel Gomp-
ers, president of the American Fed-
eration of Labor, and Daniel Willard,
president of the Baltimore and Ohio
railroad, were this afternoon named
by President Wilson to confer with
brotherhood chiefs and railroad man-
agers in the final effort to prevent
such a calamity. The four mediators
left Washington at 4 o'clock, and will
hold their first meeting late tonight
in New York City with the railroad
managers and the brotherhood repre-
sentatives.
Baker Makes=Statement
Following a meeting of the presi-
dent's cabinet this afternoon, at which
the strike situation was discussed,
Secretary of War Baker issued the fol-
lowing statements: I
"Acting under' a plan suggested by
the national counsel of defense today
Secretary Lane, Secretary Wilson,
Daniel Willard, and Samuel Gompers,
all members of the advisory counsel
of the counsel of defense, will go to
New York to confer immediately with
the end in view of bringing about an
adjustment of the differences, and
avoiding a serious situation develop-
ing at a time of :international crisis.
This action was taken subject to the
approval of the president. His ap-
proval has been given."
- Will Prevent Tie-up
Asked if a course of action had
been decided upon in event of failure
of this mediatory course, Secretary
Baker replied that he would not care
to discuss that. There is reason to
believe, however, that the president,
in view of the international situation,
is determined to take,any action, how-.
ever drastic, to prevent a tie-up of
the great transportation systems of
the country.
(Continued on Page Six.)

GO-TO-GUILD EVENING
Baptist Student Guild
A discussion of
"Our Personal Objectives"

Baptist Church

Sunday 6:30

p -'

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