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March 16, 1917 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-16

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UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

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OL. XXVIL No. 116.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 16, 1917.

PRICE FIVE C

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x v.c . .. .,... ......

SI A

RULER

ABDICATES;

NEWV

GOVERNMENT

PRO -ALL

FACULTY MNEN SEE
RUSSIAN FREEDOM
Believe Revolution Will Result in
More Democratic
Rule
RIII:~AN ST'DENTS LOOK FOR
E T ER TiRE ATiM ENT OF POOR
Prof. C. H. Van Tyne Calls Action Big-
gest Allied Gain of Past
Year
Expressions obtained from several
faculty members and Russian students
in the University last night, upon re-
ceipt of news of the czar's abdication,
seemed to indicate, that the new gov-
ernment set up would tend to a more
democratic Russia, and that it would
in turn effect Germany if the civil
revolution were quieted;
The general opinion of Russian stu-
dents consulted was to the effect that
it would tend toward better conditions
for the lower classes, better treat-
ment of the Poles, and a more demo-
cratic government.
The statements received from fac-
ulty members are as follows:
Prof. C. H. Van Tyne of the his-
tory department--" Because the allied
powers are now all democratic and
this action will make Russia demo-
cratic, it will have the effect of unit-
ing Russia more than ever with the
allies. It is the greatest thing that
has happened for the allies in a year."
Prof. E. R. Turner of the history
department-"The event may be good
news for Germany. The upper classes
may make terms with Germany in an
effort to quell the revolution, or fight-
ing among themselves they may
make it impossible for Russia to put
an effectual resistance on the east
front. If the revolution is successful
and the new government lasting, it
will undoubtedly be good news for the
allies."
Dr. J. F. Scott of the history de-
partment-"The psychological effect
of the news in Germany may benefit
the allies. It will undoubtedly result
in a more efficient handling of the
Russian army."
Dr. W. L. Schurz of the history de-
partment--"If liberal government ob-
tains to full power permanently, it
will mean the prosecution of the war
to the bitter end."
CORNELL ROOTERS
TO BE WE LCOMED
Vistors Will be Given Badges by Stu-
dent Council Com-
mittee

Asks Peace.for
Sake of Nation
Wilson to Seek to Avert Strike for
Common Good of
Country
New York, March 15.-The critical
international situation is the most im-
portant factor in the conference of
railroad labor chiefs and railroad
managers that met here today to pre-
vent, if possible, a national strike.
Both sides use it as an argument, and
it is expected that if the conference
fails to achieve its purpose, President
Wilson will appeal to employes and
employers to settle their differences
on the same ground.
The 400,000 brotherhood men, ac-
cording to their spokesman, W. G.
Lee, are determined to get the eight-
hour day now because, should war
come, patriotism would make them
feel obliged to stay at work.
DAZZLING COSTUMES OF-
SPECIAL SEAT SALE OF ONE HOUR
WILL BE HELD THIS
AFTERNOON
Costumes for "Fools' Paradise" val-
ued at $2,000 arrived yesterday from
the Van Horn company of Philadel-
phia. Five changes of costume are
provided for the leading parts and
for all the other members of the cast
except the ponies, who will appear in
six different modes of attire.
Daisy, the leading lady, will wear
a gown of tan silk in one scene, and
in another a cream lace evening dress,
trimmed with bands of iridescent
Shie silk embroidered with spangles.
Gwendolyn will appear in two even-
ing dresses of blue chiffon and apri-
cot taffeta. Mandy will be resplendent
in a green and red calico dress with
bandanna and apron, while black satin
and a red-fringed shawl with the fa-
miliar mantilla and comb of Carmen
will complete the picture of the Span-
ish dancing girl.
- David Hommel, the representative
of Van Horn & Son, is at present in
Ann Arbor making final arrangements
in the consignment of costumes.
Following the seat sale for women
this afternoon at the Hill auditorium
oox office, a general sale to the pub-
lic will be held at the same place,
lasting from 4 to 5 o'clock. This will
give a last chance for those who over-
looked the previous sales to procure
seats before the general sale starts
at the Whitney theater on Saturday
morning.
Orchestra rehearsal will be held at
1 o'clock this afternoon in the School
of Music.

SCHERMERHORN SPES
IN, STATEPEACE MEET
MICHIGAN TO SEND SUPPORTING
DELEGATION 'TO YPSI
TONIGHT
James Schermerhorn Jr., '18, will
speak tonight inaPease auditorium,,
Ypsilanti in the annual state peaceJ
contest in competition with the rep-
resentatives of four other Michigan
schools.
The order of speaking in the state
contest is provided for by a constitu-
tional provision, and the complete pro-
gram is as follows:
"A Militant Peace," J. Clarence
Ponton, Michigan State Normal col-
lege.
"America in the World War," Don
M. Dailey, Olivet college.
"The Course of Empire," James
Schermerhorn Jr., University of Mich-
igan.
"Organization or Destruction," P.
A. Lawrence, Albion college.
"Let Us Have Peace," Edward H.
Koster, Hope college.
The winner of the contest will re-
ceive a testimonial of $75 and will rep-
resent the state of Michigan in the
next elimination contest to be held in
April, the central group of states,
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and
Michigan, each sending a contestant.
The national contest will be held in
Lake Mohonk, N. Y., in May.
The members of several of the ora-
tory classes are planning to attend
the contest, and a number of colleges
will send delegations.
Combined Concert
ComningApril 20
rhicago and Michigan Clubs Unite in
Hill Auditorium Per-
formance
April 20 has been set as the tena-
tive date for the concert of the com-
bined glee clubs of the University of
Chicago and the University of Mich-
igan to be given in Hill auditorium.
The Chicago club, which is one of
the best in the middle west, will sing
here this year while the Michigan
club will journey to Chicago next
year. Extensive plans are under way
for the entertainment of the visitors
while in Ann Arbor. They will stay
at the different fraternity houses >f
the city while here, and a dance will
also be given for them.
ALUMNUS IS ISSUED
Editorial Favors Return to Conference
for Better Athletics
Proposed establishment of a grad-
uate medical school in Detroit oc-
cupies a prominent place in the edi-
torial comment of the March Michi-
gan Alumnus which left the press
yesterday. Besides the editorial dis-
cussion of this question is an article
by Dean Victor C. Vaughan of the
Medical school which points out the
benefits which would be derived from
establishment of such a school.
Michigan's re-entrance into the con-
ference is also the subject of a lengthy
editorial discussion. The Alumnus
favors the return, and expects it to
bring about an era of good feeling
which will put Michigan athletics on
a better basis.
Other articles are by Dean Henry
M. Bates of the Law school, Charles
H. Hamill of the Chicago bar, and

Prof. A. S. Whitney of the educv tion
department. Photographs show work
at excavating for the new Unior.
Change Place of Junior Law Luncheon
The place of the junior law class
luncheon and smoker after the "Maj
Party" this evening has been changed
from the Delta cafe, as formerly an-
nounced, to the U. of M. restaurant
at 620 East Liberty street. Tickets
covering the expenses for the evening
will cost 75 cents and may be se-
cured from James W. Thomas, chair-
man, or from any other member of
the committee.

GERMNS GET FEW
DETAIS OF EVNTS
Revolutionary Government Controls
Means of Communication;
Suppresses News
MANY SHOPS ARE LOOTED;
FOOD RIOTS IN PETROGRAD
Reports from Moscow Say That Rus-
sian Troops Have Joined the
Revolutionists
Berlin, March 15.-The official gov-
ernment press agency today issued
the following statement regarding the
Russian revolution: "Only a few de-
tails are known. Apparently the
former government, meaning the gov-
ernment which has been overthrown,
controlled the telegraph wise until
yesterday, and suppressed all news.
Revolution Began Weeks Ago
"From what has now transpired the
Russian revolution began several
weeks ago with isolated trouble in
Petersburg and practically all Rus-
sia's provincial towns. It was caused
b'y lack of food. Street riots were al-
most everywhere increased by degrees.
Shops were looted. The working men
struck until finally the public order
broke down completely.
Food Riots at Petersburg
"Petersburg for several days experi-
gnced food riots inthe populous quar-
ters. On Thursday morning of last
week several thousand workingmen
went on a strike. On Friday at dawn
the streets were crowded by an ex-
cited mob assembling expecially in
the neighborhood of the bake shops
and bread factories. After 8 o'clock
that morning it became known there
was no bread for sale that day.
"Immediately, as if inspired by
some mysterious command, the crowd
formed into parades and marched
through the streets singing, yelling,
and assuming threatening attitudes.
A majority of these parades converged
at the city hall. Others directed them-
selves to the house of the military
commander of Petersburg, General
Khabalov.
"At several places there were
clashes between the mounted police
and the populous. The following night
all workingmen in all the printing
offices struck, so that Petersburg was
without newspapers. On Saturday
night it became evident that troops
were fraternalizing with the populous,
which through unknown channels had
been informed that the soldiers would
not shoot even if commanded by the
superior officers to open fire.
Open Conflict Results
"The struggle between the duma and
the government degenerated into an
open conflict on Friday when Presi-
dent Rodzianko of the duma sent a
special letter to the czar asking in
peremptory words for the dismissal
of the government and declining all
responsibility for coming events in
case the czar supported Colyzin, the
leader of the opposition party. This
letter was answered by Colyzin, who
on Saturday dissolved the duma.
Czar Left Castle Sunday
"On Sunday, March 11, the czar left
his castle where apparently he no
longer felt safe, and hurried to the
army. The attitude of the government
thus being clear the revolution en-
tered upon its final stage, which
ended with the establishment of an
executive committee and a revolution-
ary government. Further news indi-

cates that in Moscow also the revo-
lution was victorious and that troops
have joined the cause of the provis-
ional government."
STATE DEPARTMENT RECEIVES
CABLE CONFIRMING REPORTS

DEMOCRACY WINS
OVER ABSOLUTISM

London Dispatch Says Success
Revolution Will Be One of Great
Events of Century

of

I

London, March 15.-If the Russian
revolution is successful, as passages
of dispatches by the British censor
indicate, its apparent success would
tend to show one of the greatest his-
tory making events of the century has
occurred. It is the triumph of de-
mocracy over absolutism.
May Abdicate in Favor of Son
That the revolutionists intend to.
maintain the outward form of the
government it has had is indicated
by the dispatch that the czar may
abdicate in favor of his son. Such a
course would undoubtedly be ap-
proved by the democratic duma ele-
ments, but the report that the czar
will step down indicates he is to be
shorn of all his previous autocratic
powers.
The czarevitch is a boy of 13 years
of age, about whom there has always
been the greatest mystery. Four girls
were born to the czarina before the
czar's long hoped for son arrived. In
his infancy there were various cir-
cumstantial stories that he had been
crippled by a fanatic; that he was
weak minded; that he was sickly;
that he had died. Certainly he was
surrounded by every known resource
of the czar to guard this child, the
last of the line. The crown would
have passed to another branch of the
family had this much prized so died.
The Russian constitution does not
permit daughters of a monarch to suc-
ceed to the throne.
g Czar Regarded Weak
Czar Nicholas is the only world fig-
ure of complete autocratic control left
in these modern days. His very title,
emperor and autocrat of all the Rus-
sions, suggests his power, but the
czar has always been regarded as
weak and vascillating; a prey to su-
perstitious influences; a man of inde-
cision and negation. Someone else
was always behind the thrown.
The last real ruler of Russia, ac-
cording to belief, was the monk, Ras-
putin, the czar's personal religious
arbiter. He swayed the czar 'to suit
his own purposes, and Rasputin was
the exponent of absolutism. Although
a peasant himself, he believed in ab-
solute autocracy. He was bitterly pro-
German and anti-ally. He was mur-
dered a few months ago.
FAIL TO REACH VOTE
Friends of Columbia Treaty Predict
Favorable ActionSaturday
Washington, March 15.-The sen-
ate adjourned late today unable to
reach a vote on the Columbia treaty
during its five and a half hour extra
session. Friends of the treaty pre-
dicted a favorable vote for Saturday
noon.
RUSSIAN STUDENT SAYS HIS
PEOPLE ARE AGAINST WAR
Abraham M. Elkind, '20E, a native
Russian, said last night when inform-
ed that the Czar of Russia had abdic-
ated that the Russian people were as a
whole against the war.
"The influence of Tolstoi's teachings
has done much to bring about this
attitude. The Russian people enter-
ed upon this war- principally to get
Constantinople; After the struggle
I expect that the nations now partic-
ipating in the struggle will join
against England."
When asked if the hange in gov-
ernment would bring about any dif-
ference in the attitude of the nation
in the war he said that he thought
that the attitude would remain about
ithe same.

DUMA AND ARMY
FORCE WITHDRAWAL
OF CZAR NICHOLA!t
RULER QUITS THRONE AFTE
THREE DAYS OF REVO-
LUTION
OBJECT TO DRIVE OUT
PRO-GERMAN OFFICIAL
New Russian Government Said to I
More Pro-Ally Than Former
Dynasty
BULLETIN
London, March 15.-Bonar Law
informed the house of commons
today that Czar Nicholaschasab-
dicated and that Grand Duke
Michael will become regent.

By Ed L. Leen
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
London, March 15.-Revolution has
succeeded in Russia. The czar has
abdicated. The duma and the army,
or at least powerful elements in both
groups, have overthrown the govern-
ment.
The object of the revolutionists was
to drive out of power forever the pro-
German officials who, since the start
of the war, have been reported as
hindering Russia's full participation
with the entente against Germany.
Three days of intermittent fighting
preceded the assumption of full con-
trol by the revolutionists.
Capture Ministers
The principal clashes occurred in
the cities of Petrograd and Moscow.
Many houses were burned. Armed
forces were repeatedly in encounters.
Dispatches from the Russian capital
today said the czar's ministers had
been captured, including Premier
Sturmer and Minister of the Interior
Protopoff. These two were later re-
leased. The provisional government,
it was said, had established govern-
mental committees at Petrograd and
Moscow. In Petrograd, at least, the
Russian army garrison aided in the
coup-d'etat by the revolutionists.
New Government Pro-Ally
The new government in Russia is
pro-ally. It is also likely to be even
more pro-ally than was the former
bureaucratic Russian government. One
of the main forces for the overthrow
of the czar's bureaucracy was the re
peated charge that his officials wer
of pro-German leanings. That the
revolution has been successful wa
indicated in the establishment of the
previsional governmental branches a
the two largest Russian cities.
Petrograd Bridge Blown Up
Advices from the capital indicate
that severe fighting may have attende
the overthrow of Russian absolutism
The bridge over the river at Petrogra
was reported to have been blown up
The duma elements which have ap-
parently succeeded in overthrowing
the last absolute monarch of the tim
are violently democratic as opposed t
the absolutism of the Russian pluto
cracy.
Throw Off Military Inpediments
Dispatches late today from Petro
grad emphasized that the revolutio
was not one against the ruling dyn
asty. Rather it represented the army'i
determination coupled with that of th
duma to throw off impediments t
Russian military success. These im
pediments, it was assumed, were th
pro-German elements " in Russia'
bureaucracy.
The Petrograd advices made it plai
that pro-Germanism among Russiai
officialdom was so rampant that th
Russian people believed it responsibl
for hindering Russia's successfu
prosecution of the war. Governin
committees of the new order were se
completely in control in Petrogra
and Moscow.
Lincoln-Douglas Debate Will Be Gve
The Alpha Nu Debating society wil
reproduce the Lincoln-Douglas debat
at its regular meeting at 7:30 o'cloc
tonight in University hal.

Corneli rooters who accompany the
bi: red team to Ann Arbor will be
r.et at the station by a committee of
he Student council who will provide
t: visitors' ribbons. These
0 onu:wii be worn on the coats of
e C. roians in order that Michigan
miay recognize them as guests of
he University and treat them with
ourtesy.
_y iting rooters in past years have
been shown the. politness and re-
t tit which they should command of
us as our guests," reported a member
of the ribbon committee before the
Studcnt council in a meeting held last
night. "We have received word that
the Cornell team will be accompanied
by 65 members of the student body,"
lie continued, "and it is the duty of
every MIchigan man to do his best to
entertain them and the track men
during their stay in Ann Arbor."
The Senate council has been peti-
tioned for permission to hold a Moth-
ers' and Fathers' day at the time of
the May Festival. As soon as this has
been granted the Student council will
begin planning for that event.
A meeting of the memorial fundl
chairmen of the senior classes of the
campus has been called for Sunday
afternoon. The idea of combining class
memorials into a joint. fund will be
considered at this meting.

FAThER OF PROMINENT "M"-
MEN DIES IN DETROIT
Detroit, March 15.-Edward Duffy
of Ann Arbor, a prominent figure in
mercantile and political affairs of the
state for about 50 years, died here
yesterday after an illness of two
weeks. He was 83 years old.
To students of the University of
Michigan during the last half century
and particularly to those of Irish de-
scent, he was probably one of the
best known and most respected of Ann
Arbor citizens. Mr. Duffy's sons and
*aughters survive him. Among the
alumni of the University of Michigan
are James E. Duffy of Bay City and
Nate Duffy of the Ann Arbor Gas
company. Both were prominent ath-
letes, having been captains of Michi-
gan Varsity football elevens during
their college days. Funeral services
will be held Saturday morning at St.
Thomas church in Ann Arbor. Burial
will be in Detroit.
Prof. It. X. Wenley Speaks at Temple
Prof. Robert M. Wenley will give
the sixth and last of a series of lec-
tures on "European Backgrounds" at
the Temple Beth El in Detroit to-
night. The subject of this week's lec-
ture is "The Good European or
What'?"

Washington, March 15.-The state Gen. G. W. Goethals' Films Damaged
department received official cable- Major-General George W. Goethals
grams substantiating in general terms failed to show the moving pictures
the report of a Russian revolution. which were advertised for his lecture
The Russian ambassador having no Wednesday night. The films which
word of his own called upon Secre- he intended to show were damaged
tary Lansing this afternoon for the in Boston just before he came to Ann
state department news. Arbor.

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