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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 14, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r f

I.

NOTICE

Senior

Dents

1917 Showing of
Exclusive Patterns in Neckwear
$1.00 the Tie
Why buy a ready-to-wear suit when we can build one
to your order at
$25.00 to $35.00
It will fit better, wear better and you will feel better
with it on. Let us show you.
TINKER & COMPANY
Clothes, Furnishings and Hats
Cor. State and William Sts.

and Top Coats for Spring

SOCIETY BRAND

SUIT

Get your Canes N 0 W

Come in and see our new line of Spring Hats
Furnishings.
We make Suits to your measure from $16:.5 up.
NEXT TO ORPHEUM

from

Wadhams & Co.

State Street Arcade

Any Girl Who Can Pass The Spring

Suits

without succumbing to their charms-and then, equally heartlessly pass
the dainty blouses and attraetive skirts-must at last stop at the exceeding-
ly practical and good-looking top-coats.
And then, too, she may decide on a blue serge frock to go with it.

Hutzel 's

MAIN AND LIBERTY

Your Floral Needs'-
Are BEST SATISFIED By Us
PHONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION ,

=COUSINS & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.

d

IF YOU BREAK YOUR LENSES
Bring the broken pieces to us and we will grind you a new lens in
our own shop. We have facilities for giving you prompt service and
our charge is very moderate, being regulated according to the com-
plexity of the lens.
It wouldn't pay you to go without glasses even for a short time, so
bring us your injured ones immediately after you break them and we
will grind new ones with all haste.
Our stock of optical goods and accessories is complete, which en-
ables us to give you just what you have been looking for.

HALLER & FULLER
STATE STEET JEWELERS

-

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
System,

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Co.
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

FORM F IT
.)he BERWICK
R ROW
Yo6mJtCO LLARS
are curve cut toft dwshoquers
perfectly. l5centseach,6fr9oc
CLUETT, PEABODY &CO lNC'Makers
To Organize Advanced Gym Classes
Students interested in advanced
work on different pieces of apparatus
should see Dr. G. A. May at once. It
is desired if possible to organize
classes meeting at 4:15 -o'clock on
Wednesdays and at 11:15 o'clock on
Saturdays. Acrobatic and other diffi-
cult work will be given.

MICHIGAN PIONEER IN.
MINING ENGINEERING
RENSSELAER AND WOLVERINE
SCHOOL FIRST TO ORGAN-
IZE COURSES.
Lawrence, Kan., March 13.-Prof.
P. F. Walker, dean of the school of
engineering at the University of Kan-
sas, has published a statement regard-
ing the -value of training in mining
engineering given at some universities.
The two institutions which led the
movement to incorporate training in
mining in the general curricula were
Rensselaer Polytechnic institute and
the University of Michigan. Soon the
idea was taken up at Columbia and
then many other universities began
giving courses in mining engineering.
Since those days before the Civil war
great strides have been made in the
advancement of this branch of edu-
cation and now three states, Michi-
gan, Colorado, and Missouri; have
built special institutions to educate
persons interested in this line of work.
The need of mining engineers is be-
ing more keenly felt now than ever
before and more students should be
encouraged to enroll in the colleges,
says Professor Walker. It is absolute-
ly essential that mines be managed
by trained men and the call for these
experts is becoming more pronounced
daily. Not only in our own nation,
but also in the great mines of South
America is the need of'mining en-
gineers being felt.
City New s
At a dinner at the Catalpa Inn Mon-
day evening, a group of Ann Arbor
business men planned an organization
for the erection of a clubhouse and
golf course for Ann Arbor. The De-
troit Edison company has offered to
donate about 125 acres of land near
Barton dam for a golf course, and
will build seven and a half miles of
improved highways leading up to the
site of the proposed clubhouse. The
site chosen is at an elevation of 900
feet above sea level, and overlooks the
city of Ann Arbor. A committee con-
sisting of Messrs. Douglas, Greene,
Hall,, Johnson, Canfield, Underdown,
and Zimmerman was chosen to go
Into details of financing the proposi-
tion, and it is expected that final plans
will be reported at a meeting to be
held next Monday night.
Miss Sarah Gelston, 72 years old, a
resident of Ann Arbor since her birth,
died Tuesday morning at her home,
411 East Washington street, of apo-
plexy. Funeral services will be an-
nounced later.
Plans are rapidly progressing for
the municipal exhibit to be held the
week of March 26 under the auspices
of the Ann Arbor. Civic association.
Through an error, the exhibit was pre-
viously announced to take place the
last week in April.
The circuit court has adjourned
until Thursday morning in order that
the county officials may attend the
funeral of Frank Josylyn of Ypsilanti
this afternoon. All county offices will
be closed today.
The board of directors and commit-
tee chairmen of the Ann Arbor chap-
ter of the American Red Cross society
will meet at 4:30 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon inthe council chambers.

MAERS' IMAGNTIONS
BASES OFMODERN ADS
CALIFORNIA PROFESSOR TAKES
STAND FOR MERIT-PUB-
LICITY
Berkeley, Cal., March 13.- Coffee,
baking powder, catsup, and other
household necessities should be ad-
vertised on their merits, and not on
their makers' imaginations, in the
opinion of Prof. E. J. Lea, of the Uni-
versity of California food bureau.
After an investigation of several
food products, Professor Lea advises
that the legislature pass a law forbid-
ding the reckless and misleading ad-
vertising of food stuffs, which al-
though correctly labelled according to
the pure food laws, yet are offered to
the public accompanied by misrepre-
sentations and fraudulent statements
which are entirely at variance with the
facts.
Such a law as he suggests would
provide that the label or tag on all
such material declare the net weight
of the package, the name, brand, or
trade mark, the name and principal
address of the manufacturer or person
responsible for placing the commodity
on the market, the minimum per cent
of protein and crude fat, the maximum
per cent of crude fiber, and the specific
name of each ingredient used in its
manufacture.
With this amplification of the pres-
ent pure food laws, there would be no
opportunity for the half-truth adver-
tising that is so current at the present
day.
Inteircoe3ate
Oberlin: All seniors who make an
average of B or above will be e -
cused from finals in June, according
to a recent ruling of the faculty. The
ruling was made after agitation on
the part of the senior class for relief
fror the heavy examination sched-
ules which they have been forced to
carry at commencement time in the
past.
Wisconsin: A campaign has been
started among the students tohelp
make Madison dry at the coming elec-
tion. An organization has been per-
fected to co-operate with the Dry
league of Madison.
Colgate: Ellery C. Huntington Jr.,
quarterback on Camp's all-American
football team in 1914, has been se-
lected to succeed Larry Bankhart as
coach of the Maroon football squad
next year. Huntington played foot-
ball on the varsity for four years.
Purdue: A course of instruction on
library work is being given by Pro-
fessor Hepburn of the university li-
brary. The course includes lectures
and practice work in the various parts
of the library.
Minnesota: Dr. Marion LeRoy Bur-
ton, president-elect of the University
of Minnesota, made his first appear-
ance on the campus Thursday when
he spoke at the noon convocation in
the armory.
Brown: The most successful visit-
ing day the university has ever known
was held Wednesday. President
Faunce addressed an informal meet-
ing of the visitors.
Harvard: Twenty-six candidates
for the annual spring production of
the dramatic club have been retained
for further trials. Today was the
last chance for candidates to enter
the competition.

If You Seek
For unvarying quality in Men's
Wear you will find satisfaction at
THE
Varsity Toggery
SHOP
1107 S. University Ave.

U -

- -, .

TYPEWRITER
For Rent or Sale
Typewriting
Multigophing
iMseopnwping
Hamilton Coil
S::te an

Electrie Auto Heater--Keeps Your Engine Wax
Costs very little to operate
Washtenaw Electric Shop
The Shop of Quality
if its not Right we make it Right
Phone 273 200 East Washington St.

Women's Song Contest Ends Soon
Competitors in the song contest be-
ing conducted by the athletic commit-
tee of the Women's league will be
given a last chance this week to sub-
mit their offerings. Prizes totaling $5
will be awarded the best basketball
songs handed in before Saturday to
any member of the committee.

A Typewriter Exceptional
For Collegians
Change your type in an instant from one
style to another-or any language.
THE
MULTIPLEX
HAMMOND
Two sets of type in each machine.
"Je Turn the Knob" Presto one or the other
simpl- Compact-Portable
Beautiful work-beyond compare.
If not inclined to a new machine,
inquire for our Factory Rebuilts.,
We Rent Machines of high quality.
Patrons: President Woodro Wilson
Cardinal Merry del Val
Dr. Alexander Graham Bell
Chancellor Rev. B. G. Trant
Bishop John G. Murray
Willam Dean Howels
also all Colleges and Urversities
Our special terms to collegians will
interest you. Catalog for the asking.
Hammond Typewriter Co.
545 E. 6th St., New York
58Griswold St., Detroit
Washington: Yale university was
selected president college of the In-
tercollegiate Association of Forestry
clubs at the banquet which closed the
convention here Saturday night.
JUNIOR LAWS PLAN THEATER
PARTY AND SMOKER MARCH 16
Members of the junior law class
have planned a novel entertainment
for the evening of Friday, March 16,
beginning with a party at the first.per-
formance at the Majestic theater, and
proceeding thence to the Delta cafe,
where smokes and refreshments will
be served.
The program will be informal, and
those attending are asked to prepare
themselves in advance with a quan-
tity of apt stories.
A canvass of the class will be made
by the committee. Tickets, costing
75 cents, will cover the expenses of
the evening, and may be purchased of
James W. Thomas, Frank S. Kremer,
George F. Hurley, Neal D. Ireland,
William C. Allee, John V. Cotten, Les-
ter S. Hecht, or Arthur P. Bogue,
members of the committee on arrange-
ments.
Consult Seniors as to Positions
L. F. Moorehouse, former professor
of civil engineering in the University,
and now with the American Telephone
and Telegraph company, and L. R'.
Jenney, '06E, and Dr. R. L. Jones of
the Western Electric company. are in
this city consulting senior engineers
in regard to future employment with
their respective concerns.
FINANCE YOUR FUTURE
I will accept a draft or check for 5
or more shares of Harroun Motors
Stock at $7.00 per share, if check is
made out to the Harroun Motors cor-
poration and delivered to me before
March 14 at 6:00 P. M. Local Agent,
Eugene Kuebler, 601 E. Huron St. 13-4

NCI
No matter what course
you're taking you need
this famous pencil!
B ECAUSE of the superla-
ive quality of material
and workmanship, ,VENUS s
the finest pencil it is possible
to make.
If you like a thick, soft lead
that marks so that you can
read the writing half-way
across the room, choose the
soft degrees 6B-B--4B.
Fr short-hand notes or easy writing
3B-2B-B (medium soft) are popular.
For sketching, general writing purposes,
etc., HB-F-H-2H (med-
ium) will prove desirable.
For drafting, a medium
hard pencil gives the best
results arld you'll like 3H-
4H-5H-6H.
For very thin, narrow lines
for extremely accurate
graphical charts,' maps, de- A
tails, etc., 7H--8H--9H are
available.
Look for the distinctive water mark
finish on each of the 17 black degrees
and hard and medium copying.
Your professors will confirm these
statements as to the merits of VENUS
pencils.
For sale at the college book store.
yo e tan
This box
i'p },ka ~h i o VENUS
<., free.
State te
you qre tang.
American Lead Pencil Co. -
215 Fifth Ave., Dept. D. D., New York
WESTINGHOUSE COMPANY BUL
15,000 HORSE POWER MOT
Pittsburg, Pa., IVjarch 13.-The la
est electric motor in the world, c
structed by the Westinghouse co
pany,risg sotnto be delivered to one
our large steel mills, where -it wl
be used for driving the main rol
in which white-hot steel ingots a
reduced to bars and plates. Its pow
15,000 horse power, exceeds that
the combined energy of 120,000 ie
yet it is controlled by a single mi
at a small switch.
This motor is the first of a series
similar machines now under way
the shops. These electrical gla
have been called forth as a result
the extraordinary steel conditions
America today.
Y. W. C. A. INSTALLS OFFICERS;
RETIRING COMMITTEEES REPOJ
The newly elected officers of t
University Y. W. C. A. were install
yesterday afternoon at a combin
meeting of the old and new cabin
and the advisory board. Each of 0
out-going committee chairmen gave
report of her work during the ye
and made suggestions to the n
chairmen regarding next year's wo
Freshman girl of good appearan
for educational work, $80 per mo
guaranteed for summer. Address Fi
Employment Bureau, 600 E. Liberty
own hand writing.

j

WANTED
WANTED- A Junior or Fresh Law
student to lead salesrcrew during
summer vacation. Fine proposition
for the right man. Call 1556-W, to-
dlay, or address "K. V." care Mich-
igan Daily. 14
WANTED- Young man wants room
near campus with private family.
Address Michigan Daily, Box Al-
bert. 14
WANTED-Lady for educational work
In Sagnaw, this summer. $240.
Phone 696-M, Albert. 14-5-6
LOST.
LOST-Tortoise shell rim glasses in
black case. Finder please phone
450-R or leave at 410 Church St.
Reward. 13-14
LOST- Loose-leaf note book. Phone
873-M. Reward. 14-5

FOR RENT

FOR RENT-Single front room at 524
Thom pson St. Block from campus.
Also two-room suite at 624 S. Ingalls
Y2 block fromacampus. Parties
leaving will make partial weekly
payment. Call 906. 14-5
FOR SALE
FOR SALE- Good typewriter, cheap.
Call 502 E. Liberty, 1038-M. 13-4-5-6
FOR SALE-5 months old female Eng-
lish Bull Pup. Enquire box W. 14-5
MISCELLANEOUS
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY-Sell San-
itary Brushes. See Mr. Hollister,
the manufacturer, at the Allenel
Hotel, Wednesday and Thursday,
March 14 and 15, 21 and 22, and 28
and 29, from 10-12 A. M., 1:30-5 P.
M. and 7-8 P. M. Liberal commis-
sion.

Our Great Co-operative Sale of
Pianos and Player Pianos.
Will save you Money
Beautiful New Grand Pianos
$460.00 Time Payment

7

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Main St.

Phone 1707

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