100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 11, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



*

il

TODAY
- House Peters and
in "The Velvet Paw."

*
*
*
*
*

INTRODUCE HELTR
BILLS IN__280STATES1

TO GIVE COURSES IN DETROIT COMMITTEES TO CONTINUE
UNION NATIONAL CAMPAIGN

Professors
Wenley Me

Van Tyne, Cross and Enough Money .on Hand to Push
et Metropolitan Classes. Building Operations; Pittsburg
and Buffalo to Be Covered

tt and Jeff cartoon. *
}rpheum--William H. Crane
"David Harum." *
ilajestie-Vaudeville. *
* * * * * * * * 4. * * *
AT THE MAJESTIC.
feature of Thursday's bill at
ajestic theater will be V. Chan-
imith's new girl act, "The Fresh-
This miniature musical com-
ings pretty girls and lively tunes
atchy melodies. The act is elab-
y costumed and is complete with
J scenery. The title role in "The
mian" is played by Bud Walsh,
:iss Fritzi Fritz plays the role of
llege president's daughter. he
a clever delineation of a "fresh"
n.an's troubles on the day he en-
ollege.
ARBOR MAY ET 1918
iTI-TUBE1WULOSIS MEETING
Carol F. Walton, state secre-
f the Michigan Anti-Tuberculosis
ation, has returned from the
sippi Valley conference of the
ation held in Louisville, Ken-
She was one of the 85 dele-
appointed by Governor Ferris to
the convention. The purpose
conference was to co-ordinate
fforts of the anti-tuberculosis
rs in the central states and to
neet the problems that confront
at present. There were more
tes present than ever before.
is are already being made to
re the convention of the associa-
a 1918 for this city. If condi-
are as favorable in two years as
re now it is believed it will be
le to hold the convention in
.rbor at that time.

Insurance Legislation Designed to Aid
in Controlling Spread of
Tuberculosis.
New York, Oct. 10.-The National
Association for the Study and Preven-
tion of Tuberculosis announces that
nearly 1,500 anti-tuberculosis associa-I
tions in the United States will be asked
to participate in a campaign for
health insurance legislation by the
American Association of Labor Legis-
lation. During the coming winter
more than 20 states will see bills, ask-
ing for health insurance legislation,
introduced.
Health insurance is designed to aid
in controlling the spread of tubercu-
losis. First it will provide means for
locating cases now hidden to ordinary
methods, and secondly it will help to
secure the much needed medical care
in hospitals. But the greatest benefit
to be derived will come from the pro-
motion of periodic physical 'examina-
tions in all industries, because em-
ployers and employes alike would be
interested to see that this most deadly
disease was discovered before it had
developed too far..
The proposed bills provide for an in-
surance fund maintained by the peo-
ple and the state. Every worker earn-
ing $100 a month or less will be cov-
ered by these laws, which anti-tuber-
culosis workers believe to be the
greatest preventative measure ever in-
troduced in this country.
Prof. Thieme Publishes New Book
Prof. Hugo P. Thieme is the author
of a book on the History of French
Versification recently published in
France. The book contains a preface
by M. Gustav Lanson, and is publish-
ed by H. Champion, one of the Paris
publishers, whose work has not been
stopped by the war.

The University extension department
has organized a series of credit courses
this year to be given in Detroit, Jack-
son, Saginaw, Battle Creek, and other
cities in the state. The courses given
entitle the student to two hours of
University credit.
In Detroit, Prof. C. H. Van Tyne
held the first meeting of his class in
political and constitutional history of
the United States last Saturday at the
Central high school. The enrollment
in this course, although large at the
first meeting, will not be complete
until the next meeting of the class,
Saturday, October 21.
Prof. H. R. Cross will hold the pre-
liminary meeting of his course in fine
arts Thursday evening in the Cass
Technical high school. A room is now
being fitted up at the Central high
school for Professor Cross' classes.

Work on the Michigan Union na-
tional membership campaign will be
continued during the next two months.
A. large number of alumni all over the
United States 'who did not tespond
when the big campaign was on last
fall will be asked to wear the life
membership button.
This work is being done quietly as
the national committees believe that
enough money to continue the Union
building operations for the time being
has been raised. That they are cer-
tain of this fact is shown by their
ordering the building committee to go
ahead with their plans. The cities
of Pittsburg and Buffalo will be cov-
ered, cities where practically' no work
was done in the campaign last fall.

BOORKREVIEWS
Year Book of the Carnegie Endow-
ment for International Peace, 2 Jack-
son Place, Washrxgton, D. C.
One of the interesting features of
the report of the Carnegie Endow-
ment for International Peace is the
increased activity in the western
hemisphere. The European war has
put a stop to the ordinary investiga-
tions in Europe and driven the com-
mission into other fields for its ma-
terials. As a result, the divisions of
education and intercourse, and of
economics and history have practically
confined their attention to the South
'American republics. One of the re-
sults of these investigations was the
second pan-American scientific con-
gress, held at Washington in Decem-
ber, 1915. Part of the work in South
America has been the spreading of
the purposes and aims of the Carnegie
endowment among those countries.
The most important addition to the
endowment library is the vast num-
bers of pamphlets which have been re-
ceyed from Europe, the contributions
of the collaborators of the endowment
in foreign countries. This collection
constitutes the fugitive history of the
present time and will be of increasing
interest and value after the war.
One of the special undertakings of
the endowment for the past year was
the organization of the Medical Broth-
erhood, whose purpose is to secure the
influence of physicians and surgeons
toward securing a higher standard of
international morality.
One of the special phases of the
work in the field of international law
is the collection in volume form of
all the diplomatic correspondence of
the United States during the European
war.
"A Hand Book of Organizations Ad-
mitting Women to Membership" is the
title of the new pamphlet published by
the Inter-Sorority association for the
benefit of university women. A com-

mittee, with Genevieve Rowe, '17, as
chairman, assisted by Mrs. F. N.
Scott, Margaret Cooley, '18, and Alice
Wieber. '17, are responsible for the
publication. The campus organiza-
tions, their aims and accomplishments,
the various honor societies with an ex-
planation of their eligibility rules,
sororities and their locations, together
with a complete list of the rushing
rules, completes the contests.
The pampblets have been distributed
among the various sorority houses,
league houses and dormitories. They
are especially for the benefit of fresh-
men and new upperclassmen, and if
any women have been unable to ob-
tain copies, they can do so by apply-
ing to the University Y. W. C. A. It
is hoped that this paper will make
clear to all new students Michigan
women's ideals and will also prevent
misunderstandings which have arisen
in the past because of the lack of
definite information.
ONLY ONE MARINE CORPS
R IFLE TE AM ENTERS MATCH

0

{
I

Prof. R. 1VL Wenley will gt've a To Formulate Class Football Schedule
course in philosophy of religion this As yet nothing definite has been
year. in Detroit. The first meeting of reached in regard to interclass foot-
this course will be held in the Central ball. It is impossible for intercollege
high school Saturday, October 14. An manager James Chenot to draw up,
interesting feature of the Detroit en- a schedule as it is not known just
rollment is the large number of stu- how many teams will be in the field.
dents other than teachers who are It is the plan of those in charge to ap-'
planning to take the courses. point managers for those teams which'
Prof. T. E. Rankin organized the are not represented. If this is done
Saginaw classes last Saturday. The soon a schedule will be formulated
course is one in the study of the this week and it is hoped that class
drama. Prof. S. R. Gingerich has had football will be well under way by
charge of the Saginaw division for the latter part of next week.
INTRAMURAL DIRECTOR ROWE N. T. S1 PLANS BIG CAMPAIGN FOR
SUFFERS BAD ANKLE SPRAIN RED CROSS CHRISTMAS SEALS
Yesterday afternoon while In- Three hundred million Red Cross
tramural Director Rowe was directing Christmas seals are now being printed

Washington, Oct. 10.-When national
guard and civilian rifle club teams
from every state gather at Jackson-
ville# Fla., October 20-26, to compete
in the national matches, they will find
only the marine corps rifle team rep-
resenting the United States regulars.
Reports from practice at the Wake-
field, Mass., range indicate that a high
score will again be set up by the
marine riflemen. At the matches will
be a battalion of 300 marines to act as
scorers and markers.
See Schaeberle & Son, 110 South
Main street, for Ukeleles, Martin Gui-
tars, Mandolins and all Musical Instru-
ments. oct3tf
To learn tipewiting w ll
requires a lose applioatio
inrtrz .ir bod frm
-1 .m
E U M m

the activities of the freshmen-reserve in Cincinnati to be used in the biggest
scrimmage he was accidentally hit by Red Cross campaign ever attempted
one of the charges. He was carred by the National Tuberculosis society.
to the clubhouse, where a badly Although,$800,000 was netted in the
sprained ankle was found to be his sale of 1915, the society hopes to in-
portion. The injury will put the ath- crease the sales for this year to 100,-
letic official out of "the thick" for some 000,000 seals, or $1,000,000 worth of'
time. the stamps.

MUSIC

1916

- 1917

OCTOBER 12

LOUISE HOMER, Contralto
Metropolitan Opera Company

JANUARY 26
BOSTON $YMPHONY
ORCHE STRA
Dr. Karl Jiuck, Conductor

NOVEMBER 8

FRITZ KRESLER, Violinist
Renolvned Austrian Artist

FEBRUARY 28

DECEMBER 12

.

OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH
Pianist
Distinguished Russian
,11usician'

HAROLD BAUER, Pianist
PABLO CASALS,
Violoncellist
An Unsurpassable Combin-
ation

j.

MADAME LOUISE HQMER

HAROLD BAUER

DI. ALBERT A. STANLEY, Director

Ann Arbor Concerts

To Be Given In

HILL

AUDITORIUM

ONE OF THE WORLDS FINEST MUSIC HALLS

Reserve Seat Ticket Sale

FRITZ KREISLER

Monday Oct. 9,8:00 A. M. Block "A" -
Tuesday Oct. 10, 8:00 A. M. Block "B"-
Wednesday Oct. 11, 8:09 A. M. Block "C"
Wednesday Oct. 11, 1:00 P. M. Single Tickets

$4.00
- 3.50
- 3.00
$1, $1.50, $2

OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH

COURSE TICKETS contain cover coupon good
for $3 when exchanged for May Festival course
tickets in the Spring.
AN ALL STAR SERIES BY MUSI-
CIANS OF WORLD FAME
See Special Choral Union Announcement

DIL KARL NUOR

PABLO CASALS,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan