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March 14, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-14

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WEA 1HE
W FLURRIES
COLDER

I

iriLi i wn &tij

UNITED PRES
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

.. ...

VOL.,XXVII. No. 114. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 1917. PRICE FIVE C1

FAOUNBILER
OF PANAMA CNAL
SPEAKS TONIGHT
MAJ.GEN. GEO. W. GOETHALS TO
TELL SOME' ENGINEERS'
PROBLEMS
ADDRESS ILLUSTRATED
BY MOTION PICTURES
Zone Governor to be Guest of Dean
M. E. Cooley During Stay
in City
Maj.-Gen. George W. Goethals, "the
builder of the Panama canal," will
lecture at $ o'clock tonight in Hill
auditorium, speaking on "Some Con-
structive Features of the Panama Can-
al." The address will be illustrated
with stereoptican slides, and two reels
of motion pictures taken under the di-
rect supervision of General Goethals.
This afternoon General Goethals
will become an honorary member of
Tau Beta Pi, along with the 11 mem-
bers of the junior class, who will be
ken into active membership. A ban-
quet will follow the initiation. Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley of the engineering
college will entertain General Goethals
while he is in the city.
'General Goethals will make clear
the great problems which confronted
thle engineers in the building of the
greatest artificialtwaterway in the
world. Throughout almost the entire
construction period, he was the driv-
ing force of the 40,000 employees,
whose salaries aggregated more than
$2,000,000 monthly.rHaving had com-
plete supervision over the zone, not
only as an engineer but also as the
governor, General Goethals has been
enabled to gain a thorough knowl-
edge of the canal and its problems.
MUST BE HEALTHY
Passing of Physical Exam Necessary'
to Enter Grinnell College
Grinnell, Ia., March 13.-Physical as
well as mental ability is to be re-
quired of all attempting to enter Grin-
nell college next fall. The require-
ments are to be made in an effort to
curtail the size of the student' body.
Not only will prospective students
be'obliged to show a mental capacity
sufficient to warrant' their admission
to the college, but they must also be
able to produce a certificate of phy-
sical fitness from their home physician,
and a garantee of moral character
from someone of reputable worth.
The faculty fear lest the student
body, unless preventive measures are
taken, will ultimately assume propor-
tions with which the accommodations
of Grinnell in buildings and professors
are entirely inadequate to cope. To
prevent such a contingency it is be-
lieved much easier and more expedi-
tious to decrease the number of stu-
dents rather than increase the size of
the college.
ALPHA NU TO REPRODUCE
LINCOLNDOUGLAS DEBATE
Alpha Nu debating society will re-
produce the historic.al Lincoln-Douglas
debate, "explaining away" the great
slavery crisis. The revival of the
famous discussion will be given at the
next regular meeting of the society on
Friday evening in University hall at

7:30 o'clock.
Mark Bailey, grad., will give Lin-
coln's argument while C. E. Bailey, '17,
will repeat Douglas' discussion which
failed to "explain away the crisis."
Following the debate there will be
an open discussion on: "Resolved,
That the power of the president to de-
Scide our foreign policy should be cur-
tailed." The discussion' will be led
by Rodney Dunette, '18.
The meeting will be called to order
promptly at 7: 0 o'clock.

Lectures In Auditorium Tonight

GERMAN RELATIONS
WITH U.S. STRAINED

No Fresh Cases
Of Scarlet fever

REPRESENTATIVE UNABLE
PRESENT LETTER TO
LANSING

TOE

Health Authorities Report
Checked; Fraternities
Quarantined

Epidemic
Still

J

Washington, March 13.-The
state department officially indi-
cated this afternoon that Germany
will have to alter her no warn-
ing declaration before this gov-
ernment will consider any change
from its announced right of shoot-
ing a submarine at sight.
Washington, March 13.-Relations
between the state department and
Swiss Minister Ritter, acting for Ger-
many, are again strained. They are
so touchy that Ritter has been un-
able, despite frequent visits to the
state department, to present to Secrete
tary Lansing a communication from
Germany repeating the latter's request
for amending and reconstructing the
Prussian treaty of 1798.
Lansing has been otherwise engaged
each time. The department has
studiously denied the reports of fric-
tion, but despite these denials it is
known positively and beyond a doubt
that Ritter has been unable to present
his document. Moreover, it is known
that some of Ritter's evidently pro-
German moves, after Count Bernstorff
departed, displeased the state depart-
ment.

MAJOR-GENERAL GEORE W. GOETHALS

'THREE BIG BOOSTS FO
MILITARY CORPS HERE

MAJ. C. E. WILSON TO

ASSUME1

COMMAND; GRANT USE OF
BARBOUR GYM

Three big boosts for military train-
ing at Michigan in the form of the
acceptance by Major Clyde E. Wilson
of the task of directing the volunteer
drills, the favorable inspection .of the
University by Captain Longenecker of
the United States army, and the open-
ing of Barbour gymnasium to the use
of the student drillers developed yes-
terday. Major Wilson's long exper-
ience in military life, including ser-
vice in the Spanish-American war,
fits him pre-eminently for the work he,
has undertaken.
Captain Longenecker, who is now
stationed at M. A. C., was detailed to
inspect the University with a view to
determining the advisability of intro-
ducing a course in military science to
be given by an officer of the United
States army. His report will be favor-
able and the course will ,be installed
next fall unless the war situation in-
terferes.
The University has consented to let
the drillers make use of the Barbour
gymnasium in order to make possible
the efficient handling of the large num-
ber of students who will appear for the
drills from now on. The military corps
will now have the use of one half of
Waterman gym and all of Barbour
gym.
The rifles loaned to the students by
the government through the courtesy
of Major Wilson will be used for the
first time tonight. Every man out will
be given instruction in their use. The
usual program will be varied to permit
those who wish to hear the lecture by
General Goethals to leave at 8 o'clock.
The drill will be discontinued at that
time if enough wish to leave.

BERNSTORFF SCORNED.
FOR SEARCH PROTEST
'DIPLOMATS STATE HE CANNOT
OBJECT TO TREATMENT
IN HALIFAX
Washington, March 13.-The dec-
laration that ex-Ambassador von
Bernstorff would protest to the United
States over the treatment accorded
him and his party at Halifax by Brit-
ish authorities was the cause of mirth
in allied diplomatic circles. Allied of-
ficials said they do not see how Bern-
storff could object to having his ef-
fects and those of his party thoroughly
searched, "especially in view of the
severe test applied to United States
consuls and their wives as they left
Germany after the break in relations."
These officials pointed out that safe
conduct means safe conduct only for
the body of the persons involved. Any
effects such persons carry, according
to international law, may be seized
at the will of a belligerent that has
the power to do so.-
Ottawa, Ont., March 13.-Denial was
registered officially by Canada today
that there was any basis for protest
by Count von Bernstorff for the ex
amination accorded the liner on which
he traveled to Copenhagen.
Red Cross Meets in Ladies' Library
Women of the University, desiring
to take up Red Cross work, are re-
quested to meet at the Ladies' Library
building, 324 East Huron street, dur-
ing the ensuing week.
The schedule of work has been out-
lined as follows: Monday, morning and
afternoon, surgical dressings, Mrs. L.
D. Loree in charge; Tuesday morning
and afternoon, sewing, Mrs. L. P. Hall
in charge; Wednesday morning and'
afternoon, sewing, Mrs. S. W. Clark-
son in charge; Thursday morning and
afternoon, sewing, Mrs. W. P. Lombard
in charge; Friday morning, surgical
dressings, Mrs. I. D. Loree in charge.

FRESH

Prof. W. A. Frayer to Speak at ClassI
Assembly This Afternoont
Although unexpected occurrences
have somewhat changed the original
program, the fresh lits wil hold their
assembly at 4 o'clock today in Uni-
versity Hall.t
Almost at the last minute President=
Harry B. Hutchins, who was to have
spoken, was summoned to Lansing on
urgent University business. Prof. Wil-
liam A. Frayer of the history depart-
ment was secured to speak in his stead.
The 1920 Glee club succeeded inl
making arrangements at the eleventh
hour and will appear to render their
songs. After the assembly a short
business meeting will be held, at]
which time a new president will bel
chosen.i
Attention is called to the fact that
this meeting is to be held in University
Hall instead of in the Natural Science
building as formerly announced.
Prof. Brumm to Lecture in Detroit
Prof. John 1% Brumm will give an
ilustrated lecture on "The University
of Michigan," Friday evening before
the chamber of epmmerce, Detroit, on
behalf of the bureau of civic improve-
ment. Professor Brumm will also
speak at both Cass gechnican high
school and Northeastern high school
of Detroit, on "Education and Life,"
Friday morning.
Ex-Warden Lectures Here March 25
Thomas Mott Osborne, former war-
den of Sing Sing, will address the;
Wesleyan guild in the 'Methodist
church on Sunday night, March 25,
instead of March 18 as previously an-
nounced in The Daily.
Mr. Obsorne will tak+ the subject,
"Common Sense in Prison Manage-
ment."

LITS 'MEET

No new cases of scarlet fever among
the students have been reported and
the health authorities believe that the
epidemic is practically checked. Con-
ditions at the University contagious
hospital are still bad as the building
is filled with patients with German
measles, scarlet fever, and one case of
diphthera. The Sigma Chi and the Chi
Psi fraternities are still quarantined,
but the two patients will be removed
to the hospital by the end of the week.
During the past three weeks, there
have been about 20 cases of German
measles and numerous rooming houses
have been quarantined. Two new
cases were reported today.
TAU BETA PI TAKES
IN 15 NEW MEMBERS
Initiate 11 Students and Four Honor-
aries at This Afternoon's
Meeting
Tau Beta Pi, national honor engi-
neering fraternity will hold its initia-
tion at 4 o'clock this afternoon in the
Engineering library, at which time
General G. W. Goethals, Lyman F.
Moorehouse, '97E, Sutton Van Pelt,
'98E, and Prof. J. C. Parker, 01E, will
be taken into the order. The students,
members of the junior engineering
class, who will receive the honor are:
S. S. Atwood, W. S. Dinwiddie, W. A.
McKinley, C. A. Hart, P. A. Vickers, R.
C. Germanson, A V. Livingston, J. R.
Hill, F. J. Sheahan, J. H. Sharpe, and
W. B. Sickler.
Following the initiation, a formal
banquet will take place in BarbourX
gymnasium at 6 o'clock, after which
the society will go in a body to Hill
auditorium where General Goethals
will deliver a lecture. Those who de-
sire to sit in the section reserved for
Tau Beta Pi members are asked to call
S. H. Emerick, phone 1551.
LIEUT. LUNDY TO SPEAK TO
NAVAL RESERVES TONIGHT
Lieut. Commander C. B. Lundy of
Detroit, executive officer of the first
battallion of the Michigan naval mil-
itia will address the members of the
naval reserve tonight in the auditor-
ium of the Natural Science building.
The reserves will go 'directly to the
auditorium instead of Waterman gym-
nasium at the regular time. Following
the address the men will go to the
gymnasium for drill if time enough re-
mains.
WILSON IMPROVING
President Able to Sit Up for Short
Time Says Dr. Grayson
Washington, March 13.-Dr. Carey
T. Grayson this afternoon authorized
a statement saying that President
Wilson is steadily improving, has a
normal temperature, and was able to
sit up for a short time in his room this
afternoon. He is seeing no callers,
however.
Prof. Cox Speaks in Medina Tonight
Prof. J. J. Cox lectures this evening
in Medina, Mich., on "The Economic
Construction of Roads.'

NI MSUS.oSUPERISION l
OF BELGIAN WoRF
P'NTINATE THEY WISH RELIE
DONE BY A NEUTRAL
NATION
DIRECTOR GENERAL OF
MOVEMENT RESIGNS
Millions of People Depend on Amenr
can Relief Ships Before
M1id-April
New York, March 13.-Germany ha
protested officially against administra
tion by. Americans of , Belgian reliel
work in the occupied portions of north
ern France. This fact was reveale
today when Herbert C. Hoover, @direc.
tor-general of the relief work, saile
suddenly for Spain.
At 'the offices of the commission ii
was explained that German authoritie
had intimated they would rather hav
the relief work administered by citi
zens of some neutral nation in viev
of the international relations of th
United States and Germany. Hoove
will arrange with Hollanders to tak
over the work in this section. H
dropped the new campaign for fund
recently launched in this country an
made hurried arrangements for a 'tip
abroad.
Storstad Not Protected
The relief ship Storstad, sunk by '
German submarine, did not have a
safe conduct from the German govern
ment, the local officers of the commis,
sion announced this afternoon. "Sh
sailed from Argentina. Ships sailing
from American ports are given safe
conduct through the efforts of Docto:
Ritter, Swiss minister.
Grain Ships on Sea
Hoover made the following state
ment before embarking: "We have 1i
ships loaded with grain on the oceax
now, and will start six more thig
week. The millions of people are de
pending for their very lives upon the
arrival of these ships before mid
April. We have lost 15 ships in th
last two years out of 500 voyages. W
have not thrown up our hands .befo r
on such occasions and will not do Si
now. Every one of these ships tha
leaves a north Atlantic or gulf por
carries a safe conduct from the Swis
minister, acting upon authority froxi
the German government, guarantee
ing our flag."
1OF. T. A. BOGLE STILL UNABLE
T TAKE CHARGE OF CLASSE1
Owing to eye trouble which followe
his recent illness, Prof. Thomas A
Bogle of the Law school Will not b
able to meet his classes for som
time, possibly several weeks. It wa
his intention to resume his work yes
terday, but found his eyes were 'nc
in a condition to permit it.
No permanent arrangements ha
been made up to last evening for an
one to take charge of his classes. Pro
E. R. Sunderland will meet them t
day.
Dancing and Baseball at Party
Whether your "major sport" l
dancing of basketball, you will be abl
to indulge your hobby at the Women
league party, from 4 to 6 o'clock Fr
day, March 16, at Barbour gymnasiu
The final cup game between the sex
iors and sophomores will1be played o

while dancing will be held for the les
enthusiastic fans of the red and gree
teams.
B. V. D. Dance to Be Held March 3
Barristers, Vulcans, and Druids wi
hold their annual "B. V. D." dance C
March 30. Provided the Union buil
ing will be in a state of repair by tI
time the event comes off, the affair wi
take place there.

NORMAL CONCERT COURSE, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, S P. 31.
YPSILANTI, )HCH
PASSION MUSIC
Choir of 200 mixed voices singing Alla Capella
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Conductor
"Crucifixus" (Lotti); "Improperia" (Palestrina); Lutheran Chorales
(Rosenmuller-Bach, Schreck); Russian Liturgical Compositions (Kas-
talsky), Arkhangelsky, Gretchaninov); Modern German Anthem
(Mendelssohn).
Special Interurban Oar at 7 p. In., returning immediately after concert.
SINGVI ADMISSION $1.54
Program repeated iln Detroit, Sunday, March 18, at 5 and 7:30 p. m., at
St. Paul's Cathedral.

CATHOLIC STUDENTS CLUB
at the Knights of Columbus Parlors, Cor. Div. & Huron
"Dogma"-Rev, E. J. TAYLOR
on WEDNESDAY, MAR., 14th at 7:30 P. M.
"Duties of a Catholic Alumnus in Public Life" - - Rev. DavidL. Dillion
Law '96, WEDNESDAY. MARCH 21st, 7:30 P. M.

,._________________

TONICHT

AT 8:00 TONIGHT

TONIGHT

HILL
AUDITORIUM

GOETHALS

OF

PANAMA

Ii

speaks on "BUILDING THE CANAL" Motion Pictures
Tickets at Wahr's or at door

HILL
AUDITORIUM
$1.009 75c, 50c, 25c

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