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March 11, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-11

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THE WEATHER

RAIN OR SNOW
TODAY

SinV

gait

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

r.....

VOL. XXVII. No. 112. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 1917. PRICE FIVE C

SEE GBERMAN PLOT
IN UNITED STATE1S
Secret Service Net Stretches Across
Continent in Probe of Alleged
Teuton Activities
MAKE ARRESTS IN LOS ANGELES
NEW YORK AND PHILADELPHIA
Five' «eld in Pennsylvania Capital
Charged with Customs Law
Violation
New York, March 10.The United

GUILTY
IN

SAYS JURY
POISON CASE

States. secret service net reaching into
all sections of the country is slowly
gathering parts of an alleged German
machine that was put together in
Wihelmstrasse to work against the in-
terests of the United States in case of
a war.
Arrests in -New York, Chicago, and
Philadelphia today, and in Los An-
geles yesterday, showed the extent of
the federal operations. The district
attorney's office learned today that
revelations of a German agent estab-
lished the fact that the kaiser has
been levying a war tax on his sub-
jects in this country.
Get Millions
Accredited representatives of Ger-
many, it is said, have systematically
assessed Germans in America, and
have collected millions of dollars. The
spending of this money will be one of
the objects of the jury probe already
begun.
Officials do not believe the money
was sent to Berlin. Indications that
a huge German fund was in existence
during recent elections to insure the
election of federal and state officials
who would be favorable to German en-
terprises are being probed.
Smuggle GoodsI
Philadelphia, March 10.-Five ar-
rests were made here tonight follow-
ing the revelation of a plan to smug-
gle, boxes of goods aboard the Eitel
Friederich and the Kron Prinz Wil-
helm in exchange for valuable articles
to be taken from the two interned
ships. The five are charged with vio-
lating United States custom laws.
The arrests followed a movement to
force the removal of the two ships
from this port started when Henry
Reuterdahl, the naval writer, declared
it wouldtbe an easy matter forthe
vessels to swing their machine guns
against the guards at the pier and slip
away to sea.
Those Arrested
Henry Rohner, president of a whole-
sale concern, and leader among Ger-
man-Americans here, was arrested
late this afternoon. Police tonight
rounded up Adelbert K. Fisher, presi-
dent of a machinists' firm, his wife,
Rhoner's chauffeur, Bert Fisherliss,
and Floyd Williams, another Rhoner
employee. It is believed they were
attempting to provision the vessels.
ENGLISH EDITOR LECTURES
ON JOURNALISM AND BRITAIN1
Two lectures will be given tomor-
row by Mr. S. K. Ratcliffe, editor of
the Manchester (England) Guardian;
one at 11 o'clock in room 205 of the
north wing of University hall on
"BritishlJournalism," and the other
at 8 o'clock in room 101 Economics
building on "The British Empire, Com-
monwealth or Dominion?"
Daily Omits Mention of "Gym" Act
Due to a misunderstanding in the
Band Bounce criticism, which appear-
ed in yesterday's Daily, the cast of
"High. Low, Jack and the Game" was
omitted. R. A. Ambler, S. D. Reider
'18, and G. B. Hooton were introduced
as "Doc." May's proteges, but they are
none other than the three gymnasium
instructors. It is the general opinion
of the Band Bounce audience that this
act was one of the best on the pro-
gram.

Persons Accused of Plot Against Lloyd
George Given from Five to
Seven Years
London, March 10.-It took a British
jury this afternoon just 32 minutes
to accept the truth of practically all
of the crown's charges against three
persons accused of planning the death
of Premier Lloyd-George and Minister
Arthur Henderson.
Mrs. Alice Wheeldon, judgedsthe
moving spirit in the plot, was sent-
enced to 10 years penal servitude. Her
daughter, Mrs. Winifred Mason, re-
ceived five years, while here husband,
Alfred Mason, chemist and mixer of
the poison, was given seven years.
Miss Hetty Wheeldon, a second daugh-
ter, was found not guilty.
Miss Sylvia Pankhurst was per-
mitted to testify just before the case
went to the jury to refute the state-
ment attributed to Mrs. Wheeldon by
Inspector Booth that the Women's So-
cial Political union was involved in
the plot.
"We regard the premier's life as of
the greatest value in the present
crisis," she said, "and we would, if
necessary, go to the greatest risks to
protect it."
CHOOSE MJOR GOETHALS
TAU BETA P1 MEMBER

Ancient Costumes in Greek Pflay
.:3 y. .
.....'..*r ,c ::... .d
CLARENCE HUNTER, '17, AS "ORESTES"; CHARLOTTE KELSEY, 18,.
AS "IPHIGENIA," AND RALPH CARSON. '17, AS "PYLADES" IN THE
CLASSICAL CLUB'S PLAY "IPHIGENIA AMONG TAURIANS," TO BE
GIVEN MARCH 29 IN HILL AUDITORIUM.
Twenty Fervid 19rosh Flush Flags
.Bugled on by,. Bellowingv;:{: Bystanders ., ' }',': '' S:: i~

BUILDER

OF PANAMA

CANALI

AMONG NUMBER HONORED BY
ENGINEERING SOCIETY
Major-General George W. Goethals,
"the builder of the Panama canal,"
will be accorded a signal honor by the
local branch of the honorary engineer-
ing society, Tau Beta Pi, when he is
initiated into membership Wednesday',
March 4, on the occasion of his visit
to Ani Arbor to deliver his address,
"The Constructive I~eatures of the
Panama Canal," in Hill auditorium.
Eleven members of the junior class
will be initiated into the organization
on the same afternoon, and a dinner
will follow the ceremonies.
General Goethals has already been
accorded many honors by various or-
ganizations. He was made honorary
president of the International Engi-
neering congress at the Panama-Pa-
cific exposition in 1913, was elected
into the National Geographic society
in 1914, and has received the degrees
of L.L.D. from both Johns Hopkins
university and Princeton in 1915. At
present he is the president of the
Panama Railroad company.
General Goethals has lately spoken
in many of the large cities of the East,
and has done much to refute the gen-
eral impression that the Panama canal
is not amply protected in the event
that theaUnited States shouldtbe drawn
into a war. He claims that, although'
it might be advisable at some future
time to increase the defenses, they are
quite adequate for any eventualities
that are likely to ensue for a con-
siderable time.
Gneral Goethals' lecture will be il-
lustrated by moving pictures and
slides, and although the constructive
features of the great engineering
poject will constitute the theme of his
address, he will also explain the steps
that would be taken to safeguard the
canal were war to be declared.
Prof. J. R. Brumm Lectures Tonight
Prof. John R. Brumm of the rhetoric
department will give the second of a
series of five lectures dealing with
topics of general educational interest
tonight in Lane hall. Professor Brumm
will talk on the subject of "Efficiency
and Culture." Robert Dieterle, '18,
will sing. The lecture will take place
at 6:30 o'clock.

Kismet.
Even the palest, skinniest, most
down-trodden worm that crawls the
loam of this mortal sphere must
eventually turn. It says so in the
book.
Far out .Washtenaw avenue there
stands an institution known to the
elect as a sorority house. In front of
the house runs a sidewalk, and it is
about the sidewalk that this tale cen-
ters.
For let it be known that for many
moons those persons who are so un-
fortunate as to reside beyond the site
of the house in question have been
wont to vent their opinions in lan-
guage both lurid and uncompliment-
ary while attempting the navigation
of the walk. In the winter, the hardy
wayfarer painfully picks his precar-
ious passage across a glassy area that
makes the -surface of a skating rink
look like Uncle Hiram's cornfield just
after the April plowing. Then, in the
springtime, when by all the presages
of the prophets the youth's fancy,
especially when passing an institution
such as that described above, should
turn lightly to thoughts of spring

formals and moon-kissed trips on the
bosom of the Huron, even then his
mind dwells darkly on plans of arson
and justifiable homicide as he wal-
lows knee-deep in a frigid fricassee of
mud and water.
But yesterday, ah, yesterday!
Yesterday 20 members of the class
of 1920, recruited from six fraternities
which had suffered in Job-like silence
for years, appeared in front of the
sorority house armed with picks,
shovels, hoes, brooms, axes, and pails.
For over an hour they dug and chopped
and swept, urged on by shouts of ap-
proval and encouragement from an in-
terested crowd of spectators. The
word was passed on and more of the
curious ones assembled, among them
a local photographer, who recorded
the immorLJ scene in his camera.
Someone produced a bugle and the
job was finished with a martial blare.
Today the walk is clean and shin-
ing and smiling youths promenade
gaily by, secure in the thought that
the polish which they have so as-
siduously imparted to their shoes will
still be among those present when they
arrive at church.
0 Allah, there is balm in Gilead.

CUBA IN ACORD WITH
U, S, STATES MENOCAL
HEA) OF ISLAND REGARDS REVO.
LUTION AS COMPLETELY
DEFEATED
By Fred S. Ferguson
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Havana, March 1.--"Cuba is a poor
place for foreign powers to seek to
exercise hostile influence against the
United States."
This was the message sent through
today to the people of America by
President Menocal of Cuba. He said
it in firm, forceful accents that left
not the slightest doubt of his complete
conviction on that score.
"We have known that special agents
have been sent here, but they are be-
ing carefully watched," the president
continued in his precise, cultured Eng-
lish. "There is no chance of arraign-
ing Cuba against the United States,
for whom Cuba has the most friendly
feeling."
The president was asked whether
German complicity in the revolution
which his government has just con-
quered, had been proved. He said no,'
but he added that all the papers so far'
taken from General Gomez had not
yet been fully examined. President'
Menocal regards the revolution as en-
tirely defeated.
Government troops, he explained,
have met the rebels outside Santigo
and defeated them. They are now'
waiting to enter the city. From now
on the work of the federal forces will
be running down small bands of rebels
scattered into the hills. Numerous
small groups are already surrendering
and the president believes the situa-
tion will probably be cleared up with-
in four or five days.f
SHIPS CAN SHOOT SUBS
AT SIGHT, SAY FFICILS
STATE DEPARTMENT ANNOUNCES
PRINCIPLES IN RIGHTS
OF SHIPS1
By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, March 10. - Armed
American vessels can shoot at Ger-;
man submarines on sight within the
German death area. One flash of a;
Teuton's periscope will suffice to es-
tablish the American naval gunners'
rights to fire in self-defense.
The state department announced
these principles today in the course of
the discussion of the rights of armed
ships under the state of armed neu-
trality through which the United States
proposes to guard its commerce from
German ruthlessness. The dept-
mentbasedtheGAmerican right upon
the fact that Germany has publily
announced the doctrine of visit and
search.
The ruling assumes that Germa
submarines will torpedo all vessels
without warning. Secretary Danie's
announced tonight that he expects to
make a statement soon on the gov-
ernment's position, now that arma-
ment of American ships has been or-
dered.
"RELIGION AND NATIONALITY"
SUBJECT OF MENORAI LECTURE
Rabbi Felix A. Levy of Chicago will
address the Jewish Student congre-
gation of the University at its regu-

Jar weekly meeting at 6:45 o'clock to-
night in Newberry hall.. His subject
will be "Religion and Nationality."
Dr. Levy is supervising minister of
the Jewish Student congregation of
the University- of Illinois, and is there-
fore greatly interested in student con-
gregations. After the services tonight
an open meeting will be held for the.
discussion of the business of the con-
gregation.

Carroll took second in the
mile run.
Simmons was third in te
high jump.
O'Brien failed to place.
Missouri won the relay race.
By Louis B. Hyde
St. Louis, March 10.-Eddie Carroll
of Michigan took second to Joie Ray
of Illinois A. C. in the feature Ball
mile here tonight. Carroll's time was
4:221-5. Ray's was 4:20 3-5.
Simmons placed third in the handi-
cap high jump, making a leap of 6
feet 2 inches. Treweeke of Kansas
cleared 6 feet 3 inches, while Vaser
of the Missouri A. A. cleared 6 feet,
but had a 3-inch handicap.
Mahl of the Columbian A. C. of St.
Louis won the 50-yard dash in 5 1-5
seconds, equaling the world's record.
Simpson of Missouri was second, and
Scholtz of the same school, third.
In the face of such competition
O'Brien failed to get a place in the
finals by a narrow margin.
Missouri took the lead in the spe-
cial mile relay with Michigan, and was
never headed.
Carroll took the lead at the start
of the mile specialty, and for the first
eight laps the three stars--Carroll,
Ray, and Tenney-fought for first
place at each curve. Ray succeeded
in leading at the start of the ninth
lap, never to be headed. Carroll and
Tenney had a pretty fight for the sil-
ver medal, the second place trophy.
In the final stretch the Wolverine
leader beat out his Chicago rival by
a small margin.
The lack of spiked shoes proved a
severe handicap to Vic Simmons, the
Michigan entry in the high jump.
Women Organize Peace Party
As a result of the recent visit of
Mrs. Lucia Ames Mead of Boston the
women of the University are showing
much interest in a branch organiza-
tion of the Women's Peace party.
Rev. John Mason Wells will address
the first meeting at 4:30 o'clock Mon.
day in Newberry hall.
Mrs. Henry Tatlock Dies in Detroil
Mrs. Henry Tatlock, wife of the Rev.
Henry Tatlock, rector of the St. An-
drew's Episcopal church, died Fri-
day in Detroit, at the home of her son
after a short attack of pneumonia.
Funeral services will, be held at 3
o'clock Monday afternoon in St. An-
drew's Episcopal church.
Big Enrollment in First Aid Courses
Enrollment for first aid to the in-
jured courses has reached the 156
mark for men and 142 for women
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday
night classes for men meet from 7 to
8 o'clock at th~e University health
service. The women will meet at the
offices of Drs. Wile and Foster.

WOLVERINE

LEADER BOWS

JOE RAY IN SPECTACU.
LAR EVENT

SIMMONS WINS THIRD
WITH 6 FEET 2 LEA
Missouri Relay Squad Noses Out Ma
and Blue; O'Brien Fails to
Place In Dash

CAPTAIN CARROLL
TAKES SECOND I BL IE g

BULLETIN

Summer Announcements Out Soon1
The complete announcements of the
1917 summer session will be ready for
distribution by March 20, according to
Prof. E. H. Kraus, dean of the sum-
mer session.
Dr. ,Black Addresses Young People
Dr. Hugh Black will talk to the
Young People's class of the Presby-
terian church at noon today. He will
lecture again at 7:30 o'clock, his sub-
ject being "Decisions."

Senate Council to Meet Tuesday
The Senate council will hold its
regular monthly meeting at 2:45
o'clock next Tuesday in the president's
office.
British Capture Irles in Big Drive
London, March 10.--Irles and the
neighboring German defense, four
miles west of Baupame, were captured
by the '3ritish in a massed assault
which irried them forward on a
three-m le front, General Sir Douglas
Haig reported tonight.

Presbyterian Church
HURON & DIVISION STS.
DR. HUGH BLACK
Dr. Black will speak to the Young People's
Bible Class at Noon.
_ _ __

First Methodist Church
A. W. STALKER, D. D., Minister
10:30 - Lenten Sermon
7:30 - What It Costs

President Wilson Recovers from Gr
Washington, March 10.-Preside
Wilson was permitted to sit up in b
today for the first time since Wedne
day noon. His grip attack is pra
tically gone, it was stated, and he w
allowed by Doctor Grayson to do
little work.

i

i

i 'Ii

I

1 I

TO-NIGHT
6:30-7:30
LANE HALL

"EFFICIENCY AND CULTURE"
will be the subject of the next

L

I

V

E

T

A

L

K

TO-NIGHT
6:30.-7:30
LANE HALL

PROF. BRUNK
will speak in place of
MR. HARRIS

"BEUD" DIETERLE
will sing
'ISRAcFEL"

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