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March 10, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-10

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

r 131 iAa

tti .

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 111. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 1917. PRICE FIVE CEN

s t

*SHOW MUSICALAND
TALENT9ATBOUNCE
BAND PLAYING "VICTORS" OPENS
ENTERTAINMENT LAST
NIGHT
NEW MICHIGAN SONG
GETS MANY ENCORES
"Whistling Caprice" Gayest.Selection
on Program; More Than 5,000
Attend Affair
College dramatic and musical talent
was shown at its best at the Band
Bounce last night in Hill auditorium.
The vaudeville numbers glided over
the footlights with a smoothness
worthy of Broadway and the musical
acts were the occasion of many en-
cores.
Playing "The Victors," the old Mich-
igan battle march, the band appeared
on the stage and never until the last
strains of the melodies of Waikiki was
there a pause. The opening march on
the band program was "The Juggler,"
by Rosey. The number was followed
by a selection from the comic opera
"Wang."
Audience Hum Song
"Whistling Caprice" from "The Lit-
tle Toy Soldier," was perhaps the gay-
est selection on the program, and the
whistling notes of piccolos and flutes
soon had the audience humming and
whistling the piece during a short in-
termission.
Featuring the band music was the
"U. of M. Band March," composed by
Wilfred Wilson, director of the band,
and was greeted with repeated calls
for encores. Rubenstein's "Trot de
Cavalerie" concluded the orchestral se-
lections. James H. Stevens, '18E, pre-
sented a mandolin harmony act, in-
cluding not only popular music and
ragtime, but the ,"Boat Song" from Ii
Trovatore.
Present Comedy Sketch
In a comedy sketch entitled "Cur-
tain Calls We Must Obey," Morrison C.
Wood, '17, and Eva M. Bowen, '18,
presented an act of original dialogue,
dances, jokes, and songs. Hepburn
Ingham's Jazz orchestra appeared in
ragtime.
Give Original Numbers
Louis B. Emerman, '18L, appeared in
a song number with Seymour B. Sim-
ons, '17E, accompanying him on the
piano. The songs were all fpriginal,
written by Simons, and the melody
"When We Have Military Training in
Michigan" brought applause.
Helen McAndrew, '19, and Genevieve
O'Leary, '17, appeared in the Pierrot
and Columbine act "Jean and Jean-
ette." They were. accompanied by
Olga Shinkman, '17. The last number
was a presentation of several strains
of the Hawaiian seas by the Wailani
string quartet. The quartet, composed
of W. F. Crockett, '17L, C. S. Seabrook,
'17, R. S. Moore, '18E, and Phil Car-
roll, '18E, played on the ukeleles and
the Hawaiian guitars, and rendered
several original selections.
Close with "Yellow and Blue"
The evening was concluded with the
singing of the "Yellow and Blue" and
the band played "The Victors" as the
farewell march.
More than 5,000 people attended the
affair.
SECOND TRYOUT FOR FRENCH
COMEDY TO BE THIS MORNING

The second tryout for "Les Pattes de
Mouches," the French comedy which
will be given in April under the
auspices of the Cercle Francais, will
be held at 10 o'clock this morning in
the Cercle rooms.,
The tryout is open to the entire cam-
pus. Dramatic ability especially, and
a know edge of French pronunciation
are the most important qualifications.
There is still plenty of opportunity to
make the cast. Prof. Edward L.
Adams, director of the Cercle, who is
in charge of producing the play, is
anxious to have everyone interested
appear this morning.
Resigns as Geneva Club President'
At the last meeting of Geneva club,
Helen Bourke, '18, resigned the presi-
dency of the club, due to her election
as Y. W. C. A. president. Pauline
Champlin, '18, was elected to fill the

etival Tikets
Go on Sale Today
All Remaining Seats in Block A to
Be Reduced 50 Cents
March 12
The first public sale of tickets for
the May Festival will take place at 8
o'clock this morning at the box office
in Hill auditorium, at which time all
seats in the left-hand halves of sec-
tions two, three, and four on the main
floor and the first six rows in the bal-
cony will be offered at $6.50 each or
$3.50 each if pre-festival cover coup-
on is returned.
All remaining seats in block A will
be reduced 50 cents to $6.00 and $3.00,
respectively, on Monday, March 12.
Seats in block B (left-hand halves of
sections one and five on the main
floor, last nine rows in the first bal-
cony, and first eight rows in the sec-
ond balcony) will be put on sale the
same day. They will be reduced 50
cents on Monday, March 19.
All remaining seats in block C will
go on sale Saturday, March 24, and
will be subject to the same reduction
on March 26.
PRESIDET HUTCHINS TO
TALK TO FRESH LITS

1920 GLEE
AT

CLUB TO MAKE DEBUT
ASSEMBLY WED-
NESDAY

President Harry B. Hutchins will
be the speaker at the fresh lit assem-
bly which will be held <on Wednesday
afternoon at 4 o'clock, March 14, in
University hall.
This meeting will be of special in-
terest to the yearlings due to the fact
that the 1920 Glee club will make its
first appearance. The club has been
practicing faithfully for some time
and several good numbers will be
given.
Immediately after the assembly the
class will hold a short business meet-
ing to fill, the office of president made
vacant duringothe latter part of the
first semester by the resignation of R.
C. Stewart.
Special attention is called to the fact
that this meeting will be held in Uni-
versity hall instead of in the natural
science building as formerly.
FLOUR MILL CLOSES
Car Shortage Causes Two of Pillsbury
Concerns to Shut Down
Minneapolis, March 9.-Two of the
five mills of the Pillsbury Flour Mill
company here closed today because of
car shortage. Washburn-Crosby mills
may close at any time. Their mills
are without cars.
The last of the flour to be rushed
to New England states to relieve a
shortage there was loaded today. J.
S. Pillsbury, miller, charged today that
eastern railroads did not send the
number of cars promised.
STARVING BELGIAN CHILDREN
RECEIVE $300,000 DONATION
New York, March 9.-A meal a day
for seven days for 1,250,000 destitute
Belgian children was granted today
when the publishers of the Literary
Digest handed Herbert Hoover a check
for $300,000. In accepting this check
Hoover, chairman of the commission
for relief in Belgium, said:
"The tragedy of our situation is that
people must be fed every day. This is
an American jog, big as America is
big. If these 1,250,000 children are. to
be saved, four times $300,000 must be
forthcoming every month."
PROF. E. C. CASE TALKS TO
UNITARIAN CHURCH SOCIETY
"The Origin of Man" is the subject
of talk which will be given at 6:30
o'clock tomorrow evening in the Uni-
tarian church by Prof. E. C. Case of
the geology department. The talk will
be given for the members of the Stu-
dents' society. Florence Paddack, '17,
and Robert McCandliss, '18, will sing
a duet.
Soph Lits Elect Prom Committeemen
A. E. Zigler, F. C. Bell, D. P. Yerkes,
and J. I. McClintock were the four
soph prom committeemen elected by
the sophomore literary class at its
meeting yesterday afternoon.

COUNT ZEPPELIN'S ETH
PART DUETO ISHIPS
GERMAN INVENTOR MOURNED IN
BERLIN BY ALL
CLASSES
Philadelphia, March 9.-The late
Count von Zeppelin's niece, Countess
Anna Ursula Dagenfeld, declared her
belief today that the death of the eGr-
man inventor was due, indirectly at
least, to the failure of his dirigibles
to accomplish their purpose in the
war.
"The last letter I bad from Uncle
Ferdinand," said the countess, "was
brought over by Captain Koenig of the
Deutschland, in which he expressed
regret that the Zeppelins had not been
more effective in raids over British
cities."
Countess Dagenfeld makes her home
in Ventor Heights, New Jersey.
Mourf Zeppelin's Death
Berlin, March 9.-Officials and pub-
lic alike mourned the passing of Count
von Zeppelin today.
Preliminary arrangements for the
funeral of Germany's foremost Inven-
tor were completed today at Charlot-
tenburg. Special mourning services
will be held this afternoon in the
chapel of the sanitarium where Count
Zeppelin died. His body will be
brought to Stuttgart where it is to
be buried at Koeblatt.
The inventor of the great fighting
machines which bear his name was
conscious until the moment he died.
His wife, daughter Helen, and his son-
in-law, Count Alexander Brandenstein,
were all at his bedside.
SHIP LINE READY
TO ARM, 3\Y" ) K7, AD
President of International Mercantile
Marine Waits for Au-.
thority
New York, March 9.-"As soon as
we receive authority to arm and prop-
erly man guns on our ships they will
go out," P. A. S. Franklin, president
of the International Mercantile Ma-
rine, which operates the American line
ships, declared this afternoon. "Fur-
ther than that I do not care to com-
ment."
There was an air of activity in the
offices indicating the company had re-
ceived news of the president's decision
in advance of the press reports.
COMBINED COUNCILS HOLD
UNIVERSITY DANCE TONIGHT
Chaperones for the University dance
to be held at 8:30 o'clock tonight in
Barbour gymnasium parlors are: Mr.
and Mrs. R. W. Cowden and Mr. and
Mrs. Harold P. Scott. The committee
in charge consists of Howard S. Hatch,
'18, chairman; J. H. Clarke, '19, and
C. R. Ford, '20E.
Tickets will be on sale at the door.
The dance is given under the com-
bined auspices of the Student council
and the Women's Judiciary council.
PROF. J. R. BRUMM SPEAKS AT
LANE HALL TOMORROW NIGHT
Prof. John R. Brumm of the rhetoric
department will speak on the subject
of "Efficiency and Culture" tomorrow
evening in Lane hall in the place of
Dr. Cyril Harris, curate of Harris hall,
who is unable to appear. This is one
of a series of five talks on educational

subjects which will be given in Lane
hall this semester. Robert Dieterle,
'18, will sing.
Print Tagore's Speech Given Nov. 15
Sir Rabindranath Tagore's speech,
"The National Idea Among Mankind,"
which he delivered in Ann Arbor on
Nov. 15, is printed in the March num-
ber of thle Atlantic Monthly under the
title, "Nationalism in the West."

Daily Holds Its
Mid- Year Dinner
Staff Members and Faculty Men Give
Talks at Banquet Held at
Renellen Hospice
Scribes and ad chasers on The Mich-
igan Daily met at the annual mid-
year dinner last night at the Renellen
Hospice. Short talks by members of
the staff and board in control of stu-
dent publications were the order of
the program.
C. T. Fishleigh, "17E, business man-
ager, was toastmaster for the evening.
Marian Wilson, '18, speaking on "The
Co-ed-itors," represented the women's
department of The Daily.
Dean John R. Effinger and M. Ly-
man Bryson talked on journalistic af-
fairs, while J. C. B. Parker, '17, man-
aging editor, discussed the policy of
The Daily in regard to war and cam-
pus situations.
MAY USE CLOTURE
RULE FOR GRAYSON
Senators Opposing Wilson's Appointee
to Rear-Admiral Rank Make
Prediction
Washington, March 9.-The new sen-
ate cloture rule may be used for the
first time in confirming Past Assistant
Surgeon Cary T. Grayson, the presi-
dent's physician and personal friend,
nominated several weeks ago to be
navy medical inspector with the rank
of rear-admiral.
This prediction was made today by
senators who have opposed Doctor
Grayson.
BELGIAN RELIEF ORGANIZATION
COLLECTS $10A0 IN CAMPAIGN
The Dollar-a-Month club, an organ-
ization for the relief of Belgian chil-
dren. has now, practically completed
its house-to-house canvass and all in-
dications show that it has been suc-
cessful. Mrs. W. D. Henderson, chair-
man of the committee, has not yet
made out a complete report, but esti-
timates that $1,000 has been collected.
Campus organizations, including all
fraternities, sororities, clubs, and
honor societies, are . yet to be can-
vassed. The business section is also
to be solicited.
Indiana Favors Military Training
Bloomington, Ind., March 9.-More
than 40 men who have had military
training have manifested their willing-
ness to become leaders in the army
corps that is shortly to be formed at
the University of Indiana. The stir-
ring up of interest so that the entire
student body will come forward in
favor of military training is still be-
ing carried on.
Taylor to Talk to Catholic Club
Rev. E. . Taylor of Lainsburg will
address the members of the Catholic
Students' club next Wednesday even-
ing, March 14, in the parlors of the
Knights of Columbus at the corner of
Huron and Division streets. The sub-
ject of his talk will be "Dogma."
Russians Advance on Caucasian Front
Petrograd, March 9.-The capture of
the Asadabad summit in the direction
of Hamaden from the Turks, and hot
pursuit of the retreating enemy, was
announced from the Caucasus front to-
day. The Turks, it was said, are re-
treating toward Kankaver.
Dr. C. B. Stouffer to Speak in Detroit

Dr. Clyde B. Stouffer will speak on
"What the Pharmacist Owes Himself,"
before the Detroit branch of the Amer-
ican Pharmaceutical association on
Friday, April 20.
Forestry Club to Meet Wednesday
The Forestry club will meet at 8
o'clock Wednesday night. in room 214
Natural Science building. Important
business will be disposed of.

UP TO WILSON

WILSON ISSUES STATEMENT
ACCORD WITH INTIMA-
TION
SPECIAL SESSION OF
CONGRESS APRIL

Foreign Secretary Zimmerman
Talks of War
Copenhagen, March 9.-"War
depends upon President Wilson.
At any rate, we have decided to
conduct the submarine warfare
to the utmost degree," declared
Foreign Secretary Zimmerman
in an interview telegraphed
here today from Berlin. Zim-
merman also stated he had no
reason to expect any change in
German relations with other
neutrals as a result of the un-
limited submarine warfare.
CHOOSE STONE AS
CHAIRMAN AGAIN?
Report Leaks Out from Senate Steer-
ing Committee Concerning
Nomination
Washington, March 9. - Senator
Stone has been tentatively nominated
chairman of the senate foreign rela-
tions committee, according to informa-
tion which leaked out of the senate
steering committee room late today.
The steering committee expected to
complete the tentative list of assign-
ments by tonight. This list -will be
subject to revision tomorrow. The
complete list will be presented to the
senate for confirmation Monday.
CALIFORNIA WOMEN GIVENn
FOUR LARGE SCHOLARSHIPS
Berkeley, Cal., March 9.-Four large
scholarships have just been announced
for the year 1917-18 for women stu-
dents in the University of California.
The largest is the Alice Freeman
Palmer memorial of $1,000 for re-
search work. Following this there are
the Brackett memorial of $600 for
study in Europe or America, the Bos-
ton Alumnae fellowship of $500, the
Baltimore fellowship of $600, and the
Collegiate Alumnae fellowship of $500.
New York Alumni Wish Club Rooms
Charles Riegelman, president of the
University of Michigan club of New
York, urges the procuring of club
rooms in one of his letters published
in the February number of the Gotha-
mite. A brief account of the annual
banquet of the University of Michi-
gan club of New York held in that city
was also given.
California Seniors Sure of Publicity
Berkeley, Cal., March 9.-Centraliza-
tion of publicity for all senior class
events has been effected in the Uni-
versity of California by the establish-
ment of a senior publicity committee
for securing interest as well as en-
thusiasm in all fourth year class
events.
Faculty Men Form Training Corps
Ames, Iowa, March 9. - Sixty-one
faculty men at Iowa State college
have formed a military training com-
pany and are being drilled regularly.
They are preparing in such a fashion
that by the time school closes they
will be capable of going into camps
and training raw recruits.
Majority of Students Attend Church
Lafayette, Ind., March 9.-The re-
ligious attitude of the student body
is shown by statistics that have been
compiled at Purdue. Only 62 profess-
ed no religion whatever, and 78 per
cent of all at the university were found
to be church goers.

1

Stresses Need for Co-operation of
Press in Keeping Names of
Armed Boats Secret
By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, March 9.-President
Wilson today announced his decision
to arm American ships immediately for
the purpose of protecting American
lives and property on the high seas.
In a formal statement issued at the
White House the president simultane-
ously called for an extra session of
congress to begin April 16, to render
the support he will need in all mat-
ters collateral to the defense of our
merchant marine. The proclamation
of the president calling for an extra
session read as follows:
Wilson's Proclamation
"Whereas, public interests require
that-the congress of the United tSates
should be convened in extra session
upon just occasion to receive such
communication as may be made by the
executive, I, Woodrow Wilson, presi-
dent of the United States of America,
do hereby proclaim and declare that
an extraordinary occasion requires
the congress of the United States to
convene in extra session at the capitol
ii the city of Washington on the 16th
day of April, 1917, at 12 o'clock noon,
at which all persons who shall at that
time be entitled to act as members are
hereby required to take notice."
Steps More Secretive
Henceforth the government's steps
will be more and more secretive. The
president desires the co-operation of
the press and public in taking every
precautionary measure which may
serve to preserve lives. The names of
the vessels which will be armed will
not be made public. In urging his de-
cision today, the president had the
legal support of both Secretary ' of
State Lansing and Attorney General
Gregory.
In calling the extra session he full-
filed the intimation that he would so
act as soon as the United States sen-
ate modified its unlimited debate rule
so as to be able to act quickly on
matters of vital importance in the
country.
Navy Department Ready
After the White House announce-
ment, the navy depar egt announced
"that we are prepared as to gunners
as well as guns."
Secretary Daniels made the specific
request upon the press of the country
that for obvious reasons of national
Eafety newspapers refrain from an-
nouncing when a ship is armed, what
ship is armed, and where it is bound.
Holding that publication of movements
of ships and their armament endan-
gered the lives of Americans, Daniels
requested every cable office in the
country not to send out any statement
as to ship movements, either incom-
ing or outgoing.
The president's proclamation was
prepared today as he lay in bed ill
with the grip. While the proclamation
was being prepared for publication the
president drifted into an afternoon nap
and was awakened to sign the call for
an extra session.
PROF. T. C. TRUEBLOOD TO
ACT AS JUDGE IN DEBATE
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood of the
Oratory department left yesterday for
Columbus, 0., where he will act as
judge in a debate between Cornell and
Ohio State to be held tonight.

IMMEDIATE ARMAMENT Of UNITED
STATES SHIPS FOR PROTECTING
AMERICAN LIVES - WILSON STAl

f

GO-TO-G UILD EVENING
Baptist Student Guild'
A discussion of
"Our Personal ObjSctivcds
Baptist Church Sunday 6:30

Urges Co-operation as Business Ideal
Iowa City, Iowa, March 9.-Close co-
operation, in place of the present an-
tagonism of capital and labor, will be
the ideal of business in the future, ac-
cording to a statement made by Pro-
fessor Hotchkiss, founder of the school
of commerce of Northwestern Univer-
sity, in a talk at the University of
Iowa on the subject.

Advertising Expert Talks Tuesda
Elmer Grierson, advertising manag
of the American Boy, will- talk to s
dents of business administration a
advertising next Tuesday night at7
o'clock in room 162 of the natu
science building. The lecture is bei
given under the auspices of the Ti
ads.

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