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March 09, 1917 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-09

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND DECREAS-
ING WINDS

r lflfr i6a

4:3attg;

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII No. 110. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1917. PRICE FIVE CE]
I. Ir *

CLOTURE REISION
PASED BY SENATE
Senate Century Rule Shattered When
Body Carries Amendment by
Great Majority
SENATOR STONE SCATHINGLY
DENOUNCES WILSON STATEMENT
Filibusterers Swing with Majority in
Last Minute Decisions De-
spite Former Stand
Washin'gton, March S. - The
cloture amendment to the senate
rules was carried late this after-
noon by a vote of 76 to 3. Sen-
ators Gronna, LaFollette, and
S h e r m a n, Republicans, voted
against it.
Washington, March 8.-The sacred
senate prerogative of limitless debate,
the rule for 109 years, may pass into
history within 48 hours, possibly
sooner. This was indicated today
when the willful 12 senators who, in
the closing hours o congress blocked
the president's plan for armed neu-
trality, admitted no means remained
at their command of further hinder-
ing passage of the rule.
With unlimited weeks before the'
senate, the willful brethren abandoned
all hope of gaining their ends by con-
tinued filibuster. Bitter denunciation
by Senator Sherman of President Wil-
son's statement, that it would be use-
less to call an extra session of con-
gress until the rules were amended,
marked the opening of the battle for
a cloture amendment.
Stone Declares Bill Ineffective
"I shall vote for the rule amend-
ment as presented," Stone said, "al-
though I cannot escape the conviction
that, except for particular purposes
for which the rule is now presented,
that is, for the passage of the so-
called armed neutrality bill, it will
prove quite ineffective. I shall vote
for it even though it may be used to
bring about the passage of a bill
which I am not in sympathy with."
Senator Cummins, another of the
willful members, supported the cloture,
declaring, however, he hoped he could
speak, "without being burned in ef-
figy or beingclassified as a filibust-
erer." I am very earnestly for the
resolution," Cummins said, "not, how-
ever, because of the unparalleled and
unprecedented outburst of the White
House, or because of lying misrepre-
sentations of the press." Cummins re-
ferred to the armed neutrality bill as
a bill empowering the president to de-
clare and make war at his own pleas-
ure.
Calls Congress "Rubber Stamp"
Senator LaFollette again, as ex-
pected, talked on the cloture amend-
ment late this afternoon, declaring
that an "iron hand from the outside
is about to be placed on this congress,
which in three years has degenerated
to a mere rubber stamp.'
LaFollette made slight reference to
the armed neutrality fight of Saturday
and Sunday. "I shall have an oppor-
tunity to do that in a more ample way
at a later date," he said. He then
told of the great appropriation bills
which, he claimed, were rushed to con-
gress at the last minute, the army bill
containing provisions "never dared be-
fore to be presented to an American
congress," and the universal conscrip-
tion clause.

Norris Defies Treason Criers
Senator Norris, one of the willful
12, hotly defended the obstructionist
group on the floor this afternoon, de-
claring that if their actions in block-
ing the president's armed neutrality
bill were treason, "then make the most
of it. It looks as if this mass of leg-
islation was dumped on to congress in
its last minutes purposely when no
time remained for even the reading of
the bill," Norris said.

'Tfools'
JVeets.

Paradise'
Heavy Sale

Tickets Doing Rapidly for Annual
Union Opera to Be Given
March 21, 22, 23, 24
The seat sale for "Fools' Paradise"
to be presAted at the Whitney theater
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday, March 21, 22, 23, and 24,
including a matinee ,Saturday, after-
noon, is unusually strong, according
to a statement made yesterday by
Homer Heath, general secretary of the
Union, who has the seat sale in charge.
The securing of slips to enable
yearly members of the Union to get
tickets and the numbering of the slips
already sent to participating life mem-
bers will start tomorrow at the Union
desk, the former getting their slips
at 2 o'clock while the latter will have
their slips numbered starting at 9
o'clock in the morning.
Sheehan's book store has been added
to the list of stores at which en-
velopes for ordering tickets for the
Wednesday night performance may be
procured.
AIGLER TO REMAIN
Law Professor Decides Not to Resign
as First Intended
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler of the Law
school stated last night in answer to
an inquiry regarding the authenticity
of the rumor that he was about to re-
sign his chair in the Law school for a
more lucrative position, that he had
been considering such a change but
had given it up and intended to re-
main here.
PLACES OPEN FOR TEACHERS
AND PRINCIPALS IN ARIZONA
Arizona is calling for teachers of
two years' experience for high schools
and for ward school pi'ncipalships.
Young men who can act as playground
supervisors or Boy Scout directors are
wanted especially.
Selections for those postions will be
made on April 1 by recommendation
of University authorities, and anyone
caring to investigate them must see
the committee on appointments in
room 102 Tappan hall at once.
RELIGION DIFFERENT THAN
PERSONAL FEELING-WENLEY
Prof. R. M. Wenley gave a brief
talk on "Religion and Personal Feel-
ing," yesterday afternoon at St. An-
drew's church. He stated that owing
to modern skepticism many people
pretend to identify religion with per-
sonal feeling and that feeling being
internal is above criticism. The topic
for the next lecture will be "Dogma
and Fact."
Commerce Club Gives Dance March 16
At a meeting of the Commerce club
last nigijt, tickets were distributed for
a dance to be held on March 16 in
Packard academy. Each member will
have the privilege of inviting one
guest.
Prof. Rankin Speaks in Grand Rapids
Prof. T. E. Rankin will give the
third of a series of six lectures to-
right before the Grand Rapids Drama
league. The subject of Prof. Rankin's
lecture will be "The Drama of To-
lay."

ASK PARENTS AS
FESTIVAL GUESTS
Mothers and Fathers to Be Invited to
Visit Ann Arbor for Last
Concerts
STUDENT COUNCIL SUPPORTS
PLAN AT REGULAR MEETING
Classes May Unite in Giving Single
Memorial; Arrange for
Spring Contests
Coming as Michigan's guests all of
the parents of the students of the
University will be invited to visit Ann
Arbor during the last two days of the
May Festival which will be dedicated
to the mothers and fathers. The pur-
pose 'of the event is to bring the vis-
itors into closer touch with the Uni-
versity by giving them the opportun-
ity of viewing its operations under
normal conditions.
Arrangements of the plans are in
the hands of S. S. Attwood,''18E, and
C. W. Attwood, '17A, of the Student
council. Fraternities and house clubs
will be asked to support the affair
by giving house parties and enter-
tainments. The May Festival also
will prove an added attraction at this
time.
Consider Single Memorial
It was decided by the council to call
a meeting of the senior class memorial
chairmen t& consider a single endow-
ment fund to take the place of the
separate class memorials. This pro-
posed fund, according to the plan
adopted by last year's classes, is to
be mainly controlled by the alumni,
and is to be used for the benefit of the
University.
The date of the annual spring con-
tests was set for May 18 and 19 pro-
vided this date meets the approval of
the committee on student affairs. Cap
night will come June 1 at the time of
the interscholastic meet.
Propose Co-operative Store
Following a discussion on co-opera-
tive book stores as tried out in other
universities, H. A. Taylor, '17E, and
J. A. Tillema, grad., were appointed
a committee to consider the possibil-
ity of installing a similar institutio1
at Michigan.
Financialndelinquencies in class and
other University organization treas-
uries were considered by the council.
D. W. Sessions, '17L, was chosen to
investigate the present status of class
finances.
After taking up the subject of senior
privileges, M. F. Dunne, '17L, and
Lawrence T-eustis, '17P, were appoint-
ed a committee to get suggestions.
PLAN SPANISH CLUB TO MAE
LANGUAGE MORE FAMILIAR
A Spanish club, to be composed of
members of the various classes in
Spanish,,will be organized soon. Al-
though no definite plans have been
formed, it is thought that the meet-
ings will be held about once a week.
The purpose of the organization will
be to make the students more familiar
with that language.
Grey to Take West Point Examination
Harlow Grey, '20, has been di-
rected to take the examination for
entrance to the United States Military
academy to take place sometime dur-
ing the month.

AMBASSADOR GERARD EN ROUTE TO U.S.
DUE TO ARRIVE IN CUBAN PORT SUNDAY
Havana, March 8.-Former Ambassador Gerard is due in Havana
Sunday according to wireless messages received today. Minister Gonz-
dles has not yet been officially advised as tok arrangements for Gerard's
continued journey to the United States, but it is expected that a special
boat will convey the former envoy to Berlin to Key West, and a special
train take him immediately to Washington, that is, if President Wilson
desires an immediate conference with Gerard. Otherwise, it was said,
Gerard will take the regular boat ands/regular train on Monday.

CLUB ANNOUNCES CAST
FOR 1917 GREEK PLAY
SOCIETY TO PRESENT ONE OF
EURIPEDES' DRAMAS ON
MARCH 29
Announcement for the cast of the
Greek play, "Iphigenia Among the
Taurians," has been made and the
following players will take the lead-
ing parts in the classic diama, to be1
presented in Hill auditorium, March
29: Iphigenia, Charlotte Kelsey, '18;
Orestes, Clarence Hunter, '17; Pylades,,
Ralph Carson, '17; Thoas, George Wil-I
ner, '17; Messenger, Lewis Waldo, '17,
and Pallas Athena, Emily homan, '19.
All the members of the .cast of the
Euripedes' Greek play have taken
parts in campus dramatics, Charlotte
Kelsey being remembered for her clev-
er work in the Cosmopolitan club play,+
"The Magic Carpet." Hunter took a
leading role in the Latin play "Men-
achmi" last year, and was also prom-
inent in the cast of "The Magic aCr-
pet," and "Pillars of Society." In
"Menachmi," Waldo also appeared as
Erotium, while Wilier was the Peni-
culus in last year's play, and also dis-
tinguished himself in "The Servant in
$.e House."
The entire play will be given in
Greek, and will be the chief presenta-
tion of the department for this year.
Rehearsals for the chorus will be held
every Saturday morning at 9 o'clock
in Hill auditorium.
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS LEAVES
FOR BOSTON ALUMNI BANQUETI
President Harry B. Hutchins left
Ann Arbor last night for Boston,3
Mass., where he will speak at the an-
nual meeting and banquet of the New
England Alumni association of the
University of Michigan to be held at
the Hotel ' endome Saturday night.
There are approximately 1,000 Michi-
gan alumni in New England, the great-
er part of whom convene at the an-
nual gathering. The president will re-
turn Monday morning.
BIRD CLUB FORKS COMMITTEES;
APPOINTS SEVEN CHAIRMEN
Bird lovers organized under the,
name of the Ann Arbor Bird club held,
a meeting March 7 for the purpose of,
forming committees and appointing
their respective chairmen. The fol-
lowing were named for these posi-
tions: Dr. R. W. Hegner, Mr. A. D.
Tinker, Mr. N. A. Wood, Dr. E. W.
Walker, Mr. H. B. Sherman, Dr. M. M.
Petet, and Miss M. E. Bennett. At the
next meeting of the club, which will
be held on March 15, the assoiate
members for these committees will be
selected.

GERMN INTRIGUE WITH
MEXICO DECLARED HR
$250,000 OF TEUTON MONEY EX-
PENDED IN ATTEMPT TO
FOMENT TROUBLE
By Webb Miller
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Laredo, Texas, March 8.-Germany
is playing Villa against Carranza.
Great sums of German money are
pouring into the bandit leader's hands,
inciting him to activity against the
United States and against Carranza,
while, at the same time, German agents
work through officials of the Carranza
government, seeking to align that
side against the United States.
Just back from a trip to the interior
of Mexico I can state these facts from
the highest authority. Four agents of
the German government in Mexico ap-
proached Francisco Villa at his head-
quarters in Bustillos ranch about Feb.
12 with a proposition to renew his
raids on the border in case of a declar-
ation of war between the United
States and Germany.,
Two German agents reached the
bandit leader. The conference ex-
tended over two days. Under the
terms of agreement, the German agents
promised to pay Vila 500,000 pesos,
or $250,000 in gold at once to seal
the compact.

CURTAIN GOES UP-
COMPLETE REHEARSALS FOR ALL
ACTS OF ANNUAL EN-
TERTAINMENT
RENDER NEW MARCH
AS PART OF PROGRAM
Vaudeville Sketches, Dances, Songs,
and Monologues Complete
Varied Performance
With the final rehearsal of all acts,
preparations have been completed for
the Band Bounce at 8 o'clock tonight
in Hill auditorium. Nothing now re-
mains except to raise the curtain, and
hear the Varsity band lead off with the
stirring martial strains of "The Vic-
tors." When the big musical aggrega-
tion appears tonight, it will have more
members in its ranks than at any
previous campus concerts. =
Besides all the college marches, and
the leading campus songs, the band
will render an original composition,
entitled "The U. of M. Band March,"
written by Wilfred Wilson, director,
and played tonight for the first time.
After a varied program by the band,
there will be a presentation of vaude-
ville sketches, monologue skits,
dances, songs, and orchestral selec-
tions.
James H. Stevens, '18E, will ap-
pear in a mandolin harmony act, fea-
turing several of the stringed classics
and a number of popular selections
of the day.
Vaudeville on Program
Morrison C. Wood, '17, and Eva Bow-
en, '18, will present a novelty comedy
skit, entitled "Curtain Calls We Must
Obey." The dialogue, together with
the numbers of the act is entirely or-
iginal.
All the latest ragtime selections will
be done in the approved moverents of
popular music by Hepburn Ingham's
Jazz orchestra, composed of Hepburn
Ingham, '19L, Donald E. Wilson, 18,
Hoyne Howe, '18E, and James War-
ren, '18. With them will appear Dean
DeButts, '18E, in songs and harmony,
"High, Low, Jack, and the Game"
is the title of a gymnastic act replete
with wonderment and thrills, and pre-
sented by three of Dr. G. A. May's
proteges.
Give Original Features
Louis Emerman, '18L, will appear
in an act featuring his own original
dialogue, and jokes, and songs by
Seymour Simons, '17E.
Perhaps the most novel act on the
program is the Parisienne dance of
the Pierrot and Columbine act, pre-
sented by Helen McAndrew, '19, Ge-
nevieve O'Leary, '17, and Olga Shink--
man, '17. The dance depicts the
ancient love theme of southern France.
The regular part of the program is
concluded by the Wailani string quar-
tet in a rendition of songs of the South
Sea and Hawaii on ukeleles and
stringed instruments.
Tickets for the Band Bounce will
be on sale at Hill auditorium, and at
Sheehan's, Wahr's, Slater's, Grinnell's,
and Huston's.
HONOR SENIOR LAWS

Order of Coif Elects 11 New Men to
Membership
Order of the Coif, honorary society
of the Law school at its meeting yes-
terday elected 11 new men to mem-
bership. !The following senior laws
wlre chosen: T. E. Atkinson, H. J.
C' nine. L. F. Dahling, S. D. Frankel
H. G. Gault, E. B. Houseman, H. S
Kirk, M C. Mason, W. L. Owen, W. H
Sandford, and D. F. Smith.

FRENCHMAN

TALKSI

M. Albert de Lapradelle to Lecture
Monday Afternoon
M. Albert de Lapradelle, official lec-
turer for the Federation de L'Alliance
Francaise, will give an address at 4:15
o'clock Monday afternoon in Memorial
hall. The subject of the lecture,
which will be given in French, is
"L'esprit Public en Angleterre, en
Amerique et en France."
MICHIGAN UNION DANCE HALL
WILL BE REPAIRED BY APRIL 1
Work of repairing thewMichigan
Union dance hall is progressing rapid-
ly and from present indications it will
be open to activities by the first of
April. The maple flooring has rieen
removed and the stringers which were
burned throug,h replaced. A new
floor will be put down soon. Work-
men are now engaged in sheeting 1Ap
ie ceiling with wainscoting, giving
the building a more finished appear-
ance.t
SOPHOMORES MEET TO ELECT
COMMITTEEMEN FOR SOPH P OM
The sophomore literary class meets
today at 4 o'clock in room 101 econ-
omics building to elect soph prom
committeemen. Other accumulated
business will be disposed of at this
time.,

VI

TRACK
EET

Cornell- M

March 17
7:30 p.m.

Signed coupon No.14 received up to 6 p. m. March 12th to be exchanged for reserved seat tickets which
will be mailed not later than March. 16th. Applications will be filled in the order in which they are received.
Cymnasium attendances are still limited. If there are no tickets remaining on receipt of your application
your coupon will be returned. If self addressed 'stamped envelope Is not enclosed, applications will re-
ceive no consideration.
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

-i

8 O'clock

TO-NIGHT
ID BO UN
L L AU D IT ORIU M

8 O'clock

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