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March 08, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

iAl

DAILY

. I" 1d41

1 f

A A

SPRING
SHOWING

Calkins

Calkins' Cough Balsam

Drug

Has relieved lots of coughs
and colds, and it is always
a safe thing to try.

Coo

25c

Cordovans
We have just received
another shipment of
this popular shoe in
BLACK and TAN.
Special Agency Nettleton shoes

234 S. State St. or 1123 S. University Ave.

of the new

Smart o

NATION IS FINANCIALLY
PREPARED TO MEET WAR

$20 to $40

Lindenschmidt, Apfel Co.
At Fourth Ave. and Liberty St.
Laboratory Supplies

Chemicals

- Drugs

Toilet Articles

and )rug Sundries
The Eberbach & Son Co.

-lk



u

What about that New

f

Suit for Spring

We have some beauties at $20,$22.50 and $25
made to your measure by the Royal Tailors of
Chicago.
Drop in and look them over wheither it be a
New or Staple Pattern we have it.
Camu Bootery
308 S. State St. Opposite Huston's
Bostonian and Florsheim Shoes
(NEW SPRING STYLES)

LONDON STATIST SAYS UNITED
STATES IS GREAT NAVAL
POWER
"The condition of financial prepared-
ness in which the nation finds itself
gives confidence to the business
world," says the Bache Review. "This
is reflected in the calm records of the
stock exchange."
"In an article on America's war ef-
ficiency the London Statist reviews the
results which might ensue if the Un-
ited States entered war," continues the
Review. "After calling attention to the
fact that this country is the producer
of a vast amount of materials needed
in war, it rates this country as a great
naval power which has been adding
considerably to the number of her
ships and will be able to put a con-
siderable force to sea. If the Amer-
ican naval forces are added to those
of the Entente the consequences will
be very serious to the Central Pow-
ers."
Result of British War Loan
Out of $5,000,000,000 asked for in the
British war loan, only $110000,000
were classified under tax exemption.
This might be ascribed to patriotism.
At any rate, the new British war loan
with its stupendous totals to which
nearly one-fifth of all the individuals
in the entire nation contributed, marks
the determination of a great people
to win the war.
Debts of Warring Nations
The war debt of the Entente has
reached the enormous figure of $53,-
700,000,000, an increase of $36,300,000,-
000 since the month of August, 1914.
The debt of the Teutonic forces is
smaller, being $26,400,000,000, with an
increase of $17,800,000,000 since the
war started. Adding up the totals the
war debt of all the belligerents is
$80,100,000,000.
Dvidends for Much
Interest and dividend disbursements
for March this year are the largest
ever distributed at this period. They
total $182,000,000, compared with
$154,400,000 for a year ago. The ini-
crease in amounts paid out by indus-
trials is $20,000,000. Railroads have
increased their disbursements only
about $1,000,000. In addition, 24 com-
panies are paying larger or extra div-
idends this March as* compared with
last.
Market Situation
Nothwithstanding the grave interna-
tional situation, stocks are not for
sale. Owners have concluded that they,
are worth keeping at present prices.
Good securities are worth the prices
asked for them and war will not make
them worth less. War will create add-
ed demand and thus raise prices.
DARTMOUTH STUDENTS VOTE ON
NATIONAL CRISIS QUESTIONS
Consider Proper Stand in Present Sit-
uation of the United
States
Hanover, N. H., Mar. 7.-The stand of
the student body at Dartmouth in re-
gard to the attitude the United States
should take in the present crisis is
beingdetermined by a questionaire
submitted to the members of the un-
iversity. The actual balloting took
place Tuesday, but the results have
not as yet been announced.
Several questions were presented to
those voting. Would the United States
be justified in declaring war, andI
shoulds itdeclaredevar, were the pri-
mary questions asked. Should the
question of war be first submitted to
the people by referendum before con-
gress declares war, except in case of
actual invasion, was another. Ques-
tions involving the attitude the in-
dividual voting would take if war were

declared and his stand on the prepar-
edness question were also submitted. I
h

FIRM REPRESENTATES
TO CONSULT ENGINEERS
THREE TIMES AS MANY PLACES
AS GRADUATES-PROF.
J. C. PARKER
Representatives of prominent me-
chanical and electrical concerns will
be in Ann Arbor during the next week
to consult with prospective graduates
of the engineering school in regard to
future work. According to Prof. J.
C. Parker of the engineering depart-
ment, there will be at least three
times as many positions open as there
are graduates.
The following men and the firms
they represent will be in Ann Arbor
in a few days: March 8, Mr. Howe of
the Western Union Telegraph com-
pany, and a representative of the
Michigan State Telephone company;
March 12, Mr. Skiff, manager of the
N. E. L. A. Lamp works of Cleveland,
and on March 13 and 14, Mr. Biebel
of the Western Electric and Manufac-
turing company.
The consultations will all be held
in room 268 of the engineering build-
ing.

I Maim St.
FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION
DATE SET' FOR MARCH 18,

t

City News

The banquet committee of the Ann
Arbor Civic association for the an-
nual banquet of the organization to
be held April 4, will hold a meeting at
7:30 o'clock tonight in the associa-
tion's rooms in the city hall. The fol-
lowing have been added to the com-
mittee: Mr. E. T. Cope, Mr. E. E.
Gwinner, and Mr. T. A. Lowry.
The Municipal exhibit committee
will meet at 4 o'clock Friday afternoon
to make arrangements for the exhibit
to be given by the city Civic associa-
tion the last of this month. The fol-
lowing have been appointed by the as-
sociation to act on the committee: Mr.
Manley Osgood, chairman; Prof. R. T.
Crane, of the political science depart-
ment, Mr. L. R. Flook, superintendent
of the buildings and grounds, Mr. Ross
Granger, Mr. Charles Kyer, Mr. E. D.
Warner, Dr. J. A. Wessinger, and Mr.
R. E. Bassett. Mr. H. M. Slauson will
represent the school board. Mayor E.
M. Wurster has appointed the follow-
ing to represent the city: Mr. G. J.
Lutz, Mr. Albert Fiegel, and Mr. John
McGregor.
Robert S. Fleharty, 26 years old,
died last night at the home of his
brother-in-law, Richard Kerns, 320
North Main street, as the result of
an injury sustained while swimming
last summer. Funeral services will
be held at 9 o'clock tomorrow morning
at St. Thomas' church.

One of Our Di6nersll

PERSONALITY 50 PElt C EN T
NATIONAL CITY BAMK RE
QUIR EMEN TS

OF

Served from 11 to 7
Regular Dinner 35c consists choice of
meats; mashed or boiled potatoes; one
vegetable; choice of pie or pudding; tea,
coffee, or milk.
SPECIALS, as served
Soup .io with meat order .05
Roast or Fricassee of chicken .25
Roast Prime Ribs of Beef .25
Roast Leg of Veal with Dressing .25
Pork Sausage with Sweet Potatoes .25
Pork Chops Breaded. Extra Special .25
Small Steak with Onions. Ex. Spec'l .25
Bread and Mashed Potatoes included
with above meat orders.
Side Orders Extra
Potatoes mashed .05 Stewed tomatoes .05
Potatoes boiled .05 Stewed corn .05
Potatoes fried .05 Stewed peas',5
Potatoes german fried .05
Home made pies per cut .05 Rice cus-
tard .05, with cream to.
Coffee .05 Tea .05 Chocolate .05
Milk per bottle .o5 Cocoa .10
STATE LUC
FREETL
Open All Night. .J. A. QUACKENBUSH, Mgr.
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. tf
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

i

MARQUARDT a n d
PERFFCTION a r e
synonimous thoughts
in the minds of those
who plan to purchase
the foxiest in spring
clothes.

Monday, March 19, has been set as
the final date for those who wish to
be considered as applicants for the
fellowships offered by the National
City bank of New York, to hand in
their applications to Prof. George W.
Dowrie, who will be in room 209, econ-
omics building.
These applications must contain
both a detailed account of experience
in banking or business establishments
and a complete statement of all
courses pursued in this University or
elsewhere which have a bearing on
preparation for foreign banking. Tes-
timonials from the bankers or busi-
ness men by whom the applicant has
been employed must also be furnished.
All applicants will e judged on
three points, of which personality will
count for 50 per cent, university train-
ing for 35 per cent, and probable bank-
ing fitness for 15 per cent. A general
academic training and clear thinking
are some of the mental requirements,
while banking and general business
experience are the important factors
of the 15 pa ent demand.
Intercollegiate
Minnesota: A course for student
dietists, open only to normal or uni-
versity graduates from the domestic
science department, is being offered
by the university hospital. The time
devoted to the course is divided be-
tween work in the special diet kitchen
and planning diets for the various
patients.
Harvard: As a re ult of a decrease
in the resources of Harvard university,
a campaign has been started among
all Harvardites, past and present, to
raise the sum of $10,000,000 for the
unrestricted use of the university.
Minnesota: Football was the only
sport not showing a deficit last year,
according to the annual report of the
Athletic association of the university.
The gridiron sport showed a profit of
over $20,000, track lost $5,000, and
basketball lost $2,000.
Columbia: Columbia men have or-
ganized a Home Defense league to aid
in taking the place of the regular mun-
icipal force, which has been detailed
to guard the water supply system of
the city.
Indiana: Five hundred students of
the university vowed their loyality
to the nation in case of war in a mass
meeting held a few hours after the
news of the German plot became
known.
Indiana: Coach Stiehm is giving
his football squad work-outs on Jor-
don field every day this week that the
weather permits.
Indiana: Indiana's hope for a stu-
dent council will soon be realized if
the enthusiasm aroused by the last
open meeting of the Union is not per-
mitted to cool.
Iowa: Students who have defec-
tive voices and foreigners unfamiliar
with the English language may enroll
in a course in corrective work in pub-
lic speaking now offered by the oratory
department.s
Oklahoma: With a view to increas-
ing the efficiency of the Oklahoma .
Daily, a plan has been instituted this
semester whereby students in some
of the journalistic courses will assist1
the issue editor as a part of their1
required work.l
Illinois: A Venetian fete, similar
to those held in the Beaux Arts in
Paris, is being planned for March 10,
by the students in architecture, archi-
tectural engineering, and landscapet
architecture. Everyone attending5
must appear in some oriental costume,
without mask.l
Illinois: Half of the proceeds fromt

the party for women of the university7
given last Saturday by the Women's
league will be donated to charity.

/) -~j:
JFitform Clothes

State St.

We are'

showing the

WA 's Shoe so

nobbiest line of

.I

SPRING

SUITS

and

TOP COATS

in the city.

Also a big line of the

New
Caps,
ings.

Spring Hats,
and Furnish-

First

Showing

Spring Clothes

Of

TOM CORBETT
116 E. Liberty St.
"ITie Young en 's Shop"

U

U'

MAR QUARDT
CAMPUS TAILOR
516 E. WILLIAM ST.

Active work

on the installation ofI

WISCONSIN JUNIOR PLAY HALTED
BY SCARLET FEVER EPIDEMIC
Madison, March 7.-A scarlet fever
epidemic at the University of Wiscon-
sin has caused unlooked for difficulty
in the productipn of the junior play,
"Green Stockings." The star of the
cast is quarantined at her home, due
to a case of the disease that has ap-
peared in the building.

the new Y. M. C. A. swimming pool,
made possible by the recent $30,000
campaign, was begun last night when
a pool committee was chosen by the
executive committe of the campaign.
The committee consits of Charles L.
Brooks, chairman; T. A. Lowry, H. J.
Abbbtt, E. A. Schaeberle, and William
Purfield.
FLOUR SURPASSES POTATOES
FOR NUTRITION AND ENERGY
Iowa City, March 7.-The substitu-
tion of flour for potatoes, as a means
of reducing the high cost of living, is
the plan suggested by Dr. E. W. Rock-
wood, head of the chemistry depart-
ment' at the University of Iowa. He
states that wheat surpasses potatoes
in nutrients and energy, in the ratio
of five to one, and that its adoption as
an article of food in place of potatoes
will materially lessen expenses.

Kansas: As the result of the in-
stallation of a free jitney service for
students by the University of Kansas
tardiness has decreased 50 per cent.
Oregon:. Faculty and student war
relief committees predict that $1,500
or $2,000 will be raised among Oregon
students for the relief of men held in
European war prison camps.;
Iowa: The war department has
granted Iowa on infantry unit of the
Reserve Officers Training corps. This
means that Iowa cadets il receive
free uniforms and equipment, which
will results in a saving of $16,000
annually.
GRADUATE GETS NEW RESULTS
IN BOTANICAL EXPERIMENTS
Clinton A. Ludwig, grad., is carry-
ing on experimental work in the bot-
anical department, in which he is try-
ing to determine the effects of illum-
mating gas on bacteria and fungi.
Some interesting results have been
obtained which are not altogether in
harmony with present accepted ideas.
It is hoped the results will have some
bearing on laboratory practice.
Board to Consider New Members
Applicants for Deutscher Verein
membership will be considered when
the society's executive board meets at
4 o'clock today in the Verein rooms.
Plans have been completed for the
presentation of a German playlet at
the next meeting of the society March
15.
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

i

WANTED
WANTED-If you have any old shoes,
get them ready. Send me a card and
I'll buy them. Dr. Tom Lovell. 7-8
WANTED- Second hand mandolin.
Call desk, City Y. M. C. A., from 7
to 9 P. M. 8
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Five new Olivers, num-
ber nines. Five bargains for five
persons needing typewriters. Ham-
ilton Business College, State and
William. 2-8

MISCELLANEOUS
GOOD PRICE PAID for second= hand
copies, latest edition, Friday's
"Problems in Economics" at Wahr's
-University Bookstore. 8
PRIVATE BOARD $5 weekly. Inquire
at 410 Church St. Phone 450-R.
1-10 inc
LOST
LOST-Key ring with keys. Either on
campus, E. University, or Packard.
Finder please phone 1863 or leave
at 1307 Packard. 7-8

Try The Daily for service.

Our Great Co-operative Sale of
Pianos and Player Pianos
Will save you Money
Beautiful New Grand Pianos ,
$460.00 Time Payment

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Main St.

Phone 1707

,

F, .'

I

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