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March 07, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-07

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

h A t6

D~aiI1

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 14$. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1917. PRICE FIVE CEN

108 CORPORATION
AND 5 PERSONS
ACCUSINPROBE
TWO INDICTMENTS HANDED DOWN
BY FEDERAL GRAND
JURY
AGENTS COMBINED TO
FIX PRICES CHARGED
Coal Boosted $1.75 Per Ton at Mines
Claims Special United States
Investigator
New York, March 6.-Two indict-
ments handed down by the federal
grand jury, which has been probing
food and coal price fixing, named 55
individual defendants and 108 cor-
porations, Special Assistant Attorney-
General Swacker announced this aft-
ernoon. Combinations to fix prices is
charged against the selling agents of
22,000,000 tons of coal of the 35,000,-
000 produced annually in the Poco-
hontas and New River districts of
West Virginia.
The indictments are the first big re-
turns from the country-wide food and
coal price investigation directed by
George W. Anderson, who was ap-
pointed as special assistant by Attor-
ney-General Gregory when the presi-
dent ordered the probe.
The first of the two Indictments
charges conspiracy to fix prices over
a period of three years. The second
charges 16 corporations and 10 indiv-
iduals with price fixing and pooling
the proceeds of their sales in violation
of the Sherman anti-trust law. Under
the alleged agreement the price was
boosted from $1.25 a ton to $3.00 a ton
at the mines, Swacker charged.
This coal was sold profitably at an
annual price of $27,500,000 before the
agreement, it is charged. Now it brings
$66,000,000 a year to the producers.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS TO HEAR
INTERESTING TALKS TONIGHT
The chemistry branch of the Engi.
neering society will hold a meeting at
7:30 o'clock tonight in room 303 o:
the Chemistry building.
Mr. J. A. Van den Broek of the engi-
neering mechanics department will
speak on "The Effects of Cold Rolling
on Steel," F. C. Binall, grad., will talk
about "Methods ofIncreasing the Yield
of Gasoline," and D. W. Kaufman, '17E,
who went to the border with the
troops, will speak on "Experiences on
the Mexican Border." All talks will
be illustrated.
Refreshments and smokes will be
served at the meeting.
PROF. ROBINSON TO SPEAK
ON "NO WAR FOR AMERICA"
Prof. Beverly Robinson of the col-
lege of architecture will deliver an
address on the subject, "No War for
America" at 7:30 o'clock tonight in
Newberry hall. The m'eeting will be
held under the auspices of the Inter-
collegiate society, and will be open to
the public.
It is thought that Professor Robin-
son will adopt a rather radical atti-
tude throughout his talk, and will en-
deavor to refute the argument being
advanced that the working class of
America has something to gain in the
event of war.

TWO GUEST SOLOISTS TO PLAY
AT TWILIGHT CONCERT TODAY

PREVENTS PASSING
OF BLANKET POWER
Group of Senators Takes Up Time
Talking; Deny a Fill.
buster

Washington, March 6.-Some of the
little group of willful men who pre-
vented 77 United States senators from
voting President Wilson the powers he
asked to protect American lives and
property at sea took up most of the
first hour and 30 minutes of the sen-
ate's time when it convened today.
Those who spoke denied they partici-
pated in a filibuster.
They said, "We merely insisted on
our constitutional rights to discuss any
question before the senate."
Those who denied the powers to the
president, when the senate overwhelm-
ingly favored giving him the power
he asked for, are: Republicans Clapp,
Minnesota; Cummins, Iowa; Gronna,
North Dakota; Penyon, Iowa; LaFol-
lette, Wisconsin; Norris, Nebraska,
and Wilkes, California, and the Demo-
crats Stone, Missouri; Kirby, Arkan-
sas; Lane, Oregon; Ogormen, New
York, and Vardaman, Mississippi.
The president, in referring to them
as the little group of willful men,
mentioned 11. He either intentional-
ly or otherwise did not count Stone
among the number.
OJriental Languor
In Band WBounce
Soft Melodies of South Seas to Be
Heard in Auditorium
Friday Night
With all the languor of the Orient,
with the soft melodies of the South
Seas, and the delicate, elusive sinuos-
ity of the dreamy dances of southern'
France, the annual Band Bounce will
make its appearance next Friday even-
ing, March 9, in Hill auditorium.
Of course, the big band will occupy
the piece de resistance on the musical
menu, and will not only be ready to
send the shivers of Michigan loyalty
down the backs of lovers of the Maize'
and Blue with the stirring strains of
"The Victors," and "Varsity," but will
also present an unusual program of
original selections. The most prom-
inent of these will be a new march,
composed by Wilfred Wilson, director
of the band, and entitled "U. of M.
Varsity Band March."
All proceeds will be used to pur-
chase additional uniforms for the
band, and to clear the organization of
any deficits caused by recent trips,
and the cost of new instruments. Ezra
W. Lockwood, '18, general chairman,1
has announced that the tickets have
already been placed on sale on the
campus, and may be secured from stu-
dent committeemen, or from Wahr's,j
Slater's, Grinnell's or Hustons.
RE-ELECT SAULSBURY SENATE f
PRESIDENT PRO TEM AT CAUCUSt
Washington, March 6. - Senator
Saulsbury of Delaware late today wase
re-elected president pro tem of theI
senate by the Democratic caucus with.
out opposition. The following were
appointed to prepare tentative rules:,
Senators Reed, Owen, Swanson, James,t
Walsh, and Smith. Senators Lewis
of Illinois will continue as majority
whip. The Republican caucus ap-
pointed Senator Lodge chairman, and
Senators Penrose, Brandegee, Cum-i
mins, and Borah members of a commit-1
tee to meet the Democrats. -
TOASTMASTERS INITIATE TWO
MEN, WALLISTER AND M'KEEI

FOUR ALLEGED GERMAN
PLOTTES DISCOERED
TWO PLANNING TO BLOW UP
LACKAWANNA FREIGHT
TERMINAL
New York, March 6.-Four arrests
of alleged German plotters within 24
hours have added startling new revela-
tions to the story of Teutonic activities
in the United States. Hoboken police
this afternoon held Hans Schwartz,
who, they claimed, admitted he was
an accomplice of Fritz Kolb, arrested
yesterday following the discovery of
bombs and explosives in his hotel
room.
Their plan, it is said, was to set
bombs on Black Tom peninsula, the
Lackawanna freight terminal which
was devastated by explosions six
months ago. Black Tom isnow jammed
with highly explosive munitions, hav-
ing received the heaviest shipments in
its history yesterday.
While these two alleged plotters
were held without bail for a hearing
in Hoboken tomorrow, having been
sweated by police and federal agents
for hours, two plotters of a much
higher order, whose scheme involved
a revolt in India, were turned over to
federal authorities in New York.
Dr. C. Hanador Chakiaberty, the
Hindoo physician who recently re-
turned from a visit to Germany, and
Dr. Ernst Sckunner, a German, were
arrested today in their lavishly fur-'
nished Morning Side apartment.
Five hours of grilling by Deputy
Commissioner Scull, it was said,
brought from them the admission that
$60,000 of the German propaganda
fund left in this country, when Count
von Bernstorff sailed on the Freder-
ick VIII, was turned over to the pair
to be used in fomenting a revolt and
plotting an invasion of Indian through
China.
HARVARD POLICY 1
AGAINST ABOLITION

80 RIFLES ARE ADDD
TD EQUIPMENT OF CORPS

HOLD CAUCUSES TO
DISCUSS CLOTURE
Any Effort to Limit Debate Will Be
Defeated Predicted by
Senate Leaders
Washington, March 6.-After a free-
for-all wrangle over the changing of
the senate rules, Democratic and Re-

I OFFICERS

TO GIVE SPEECHESI

WHILE MEN REST AFT-
ER DRILL

CAST MEMBERS GE]
FIRST CHANCE A9
OPERA SEAT SAL

Rifles have been added to the equip-

ment of the corps of students who are I publican members divided and held

FIRST TICKETS FOR
PARADISE" GIVEN
TODAY

"FOOLS"
OUT

Student Opinion Unfavorable to
termination of Campus
Clubs

Ex-

drilling weekly in Waterman gym-
nasium. Provided racks can be in-
stalled in time to hold them they will
be available for use tonight.
The rifles, 50 in number, were ob-
tained for the use of the students
through the courtesy of Major Clyde
E. Wilson of the engineering college.
The number will make it possible for
every voluntary driller to receive in-
struction in handling arms in drill.
In addition to the regular program
of instruction, speeches will be given
by Captain . D. Lowry and Lieutenant
Nathan H. Schermer. "Entrench-
ments," will be the subject of Captain
Lowry's talk. Lieutenant Schermer
will speak on "Outposts." The talks
will be given during the course of the
two hours which the men spend at
the gymnasium. They will be given
while the men are resting after drill.
Progran of Instruction
A detailed program of instruction to
be followed out during. the coming
weeks has been prepared by Captain
Lowry. "Advance Guard" will be the
subject of a talk to be given in the
near future by one of the officers.
Arm and whisite signals, with close
order drill by company, platoons, and
squads will be taught the students as
soon as possible.
At an early meeting there will be a
talk on the subject of caring for a rifle.
This will be accompanied by'a demon-
stration. The care of weapons is
one of the most important phases of
military instruction. The students will
be given careful instruction and asked
to put their knowledge into practice
with the rifles they will use in drills.
A drill in company inspection and
talks on courtesies in conversation
which are observed in military cir-
cles will form part of the program of
an early meeting. There will also be
a talk on camp service and duties.
Flank guards, fire superiority, hospital
and sanitary service in battle, fire con-
trol, first aid, camp hygiene, and the
hygiene of marching troops are sub-
jects which will be discussed.
Extended Order Drill Later
Further plans will be announced
later. As soon as the men are well
enough trained they will be given in-
struction in extended order drill by
company and squads. As soon as the
weather becomes warm enough the
drilling will be done on Ferry field.
Artificial lights will be furnished for
the work and the added room will
make it possible to work out company
movements which are not possible at
the present time.
The officers are anxious to correct
an impression that 100 men are all
that are desired for the drills. All
students are urged to come out. There
is no limit to the number desired. The
present attendance at the drills is not
representative of the large male en-
rollment and arrangements can be
made to handle any number of men.
Students who get the benefit of prac-
tice this spring may be employed as
officers- in the drills next year.
FOUR SCENARIOS SUBMITTED
IN COMEDY CLUB'S CONTEST
Four manuscripts have been sub-
mitted in the Comedy club scenario.
contest. They will be turned over to
the committee of judges tonight who
will read them and offer criticisms to
the contestants in a meeting to be an-
nounced later. Anyone having a
scenario completed may enter the con-
test by calling Morrison Wood, '17, to-
day.
The contracts for filming the pro-
duction will be completed within a
few days.

Cambridge, Mass., Mar. 6-The spirit
of Harvard favors the present agita-
tion among Princeton students to re-
organize the clubs existing at Prince-
ton, but Harvard does not favor civil
strife over the proposition if it can
be avoided, according to the senti-
ment as expressed by the Harvard
Crimson.
"There seems to be no question that
the. Princeton sophomores are attack-
ing a real evil," says the Crimson.
"To the outsider it seems unfortunate
that such a radical course should be
necessary. The experience of Amer-
ican universities has been that clubs
are inevitable, that the natural tend-
ency of individuals is to consolidate
into small, close-knit groups. When
the nature of these gr.oups destroys the
possibility of fellowship, they should
be modified, but to end their exist-
ence entirely opposes the dictates of
normal human instincts. If possible.
it seems far healthier that the small
club groups should continue to exist
side by side with the broader oppor-
tunities for common fellowship."
Venetian Fete to Be Held at Illinois
Champaign, Ill., Mar. 6.-A Venetian
fete is being planned by the students
in the architectural department of the
University of Illinois, to be held
March 10. Oriental costumes alone
will be permitted at the fete, and an
architectural papier mache god has
been provided for the ocdasion.
"Y" President Leaves University
M. W. Welch, '17, president of the
Y. M. C. A., left school last week to
go to California on account of the ill-
ness of his sister. Merle B. Doty, '18E,
formerly vice-president of the "Y,"
will assume the duties of president
for the rest of the year.

caucuses late today to discuss fully
the question of a cloture amendment.
Determined that no move shall be
made by the senate which will even
have the appearance of readoption of
the present rules including unlimited
debate, the Democrats forced an ad-
journment in order that they might
organize their fight.
Predictions are freely made that any
effort to limit debate will be defeated.
Senator Owen, leading the fight for a
new rule, claims to have the support
of about 50 senators.
Senate leaders are considering the
appointment of a committee of 10, five
Republicans and five Democrats, to
meet and formulate tentative plans of
rules containing a limited cloture
amendment. This committee will re-
port any plans which they may agree
upon to the caucus.
(old folk ,Songs.
Please A udience
Fuller Sisters Present Novel Enter-
tainment; Victorian Costumes
Give Added Effect
With a program of old British folk-
songs ranging through the whole
United Kingdom and all of Shakes-
peare's seven ages, Cynthia, Dorothy,
and Rosalind Fuller were given an
appreciative reception last evening by
a capacity crowd in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall.
Harp accompaniment and pictures-;
que Victorian costumes and manners
added much to the effect of the naive
old ballads. The children's songs,
"When I Was a Young Girl" and "The
Roman Soldier" were received with
the greatest favor, while the impres-
sive "Lyke Wake Dirge" was given
with feeling and simplicity.
The novelty of the entertainment to
Ann Arbor audiences was evidenced
by the demand for encores to which
the singers responded with a number
of Somerset folk-lyrics.
MARSHALL THE FIFTH VIC-
PRESIDENT TO SERVE 2 TERMS
Washington, March 6.--For but-%the
fifth time in the history of the United
States a vice-president was inaugur-
ated to succeed himself. when Thomas
W. Marshall, Indiana, at noon Monday
subscribed to the oath of office as
President Wilson's second in com-
mand.
But four other vice-presidents have
ever been chosen for a second term
of office. They were: John Adams,
first vice-president; George Clinton,
under Presidents Jefferson and Madi-
son, and who died during his second
term; Daniel C. Tompkins, under
President Monroe, and John C. Cal-
houn, under Presidents John Quincy
Adams and Andrew Jackson, and .who
resigned to enter the senate following
his re-election.-
LONG ZOOLOGY EXCURSION TO
BE TAKEN BY IOWA GRADUATES
Iowa City, Mar. 6.-One of the long-
est excursions ever taken as part of a
college course In science will be made
when .15 graduate students of the
University of Iowa join the expedition
of zoology and geology classes to the
West Indies this month.
Some time ago, a class of under-
graduates made a scientific expedition
to the Bahama islands, but were in-
convenienced in their researches be-
cause of the bad weather during the
rainy season. To guard against such
conditions on the present tour, a com-,

plete laboratory will be taken along
which will afford the students a
chance to engage in their work on
shore, in case of storms and inclement
weather.
Golfers Will Meet in Trophy Room
There willbe a meeting of the golf-
ers in the trophy room of the gym- ,
nasium at 7:15 o'clock tonight, instead,
of in the Athletic office as formerly
announced.-

GENERAL DISTRIBUTION
WILL BEGIN SATURDAY
Yearly Members Receive Admissions
Next Wednesday and
Thursday
Announcement was made yesterday
of the seat sale for "Fools' Paradise,"
the 1917 Union opera to be given on
March 21, 22, 23, and 24. A system
similar to that of last year will be
used, whereby the standing in line and
confusion of past years will be al-
leviated. ,
Difficulty and mistakes can be avoid-
ed by those desiring to procure seats
by carefully noting the system as it is
given below. Each person will be
given an opportunity to purchase four
tickets as follows: Members of the
cast, chorus, committees, and orches-
tra, as well as full-paid life members
of the Union have already received
slips which are to be filled out and
sent to the Michigan Union accom-
pained by money orders not later than
tonight. These will be filed in the
order in which they are received.
Participating life members have
been sent slips which are to be filled
out and presented at the Union desk
Saturday morning, March 10, starting
at 9 o'clock. These will be given a
number, depending upon the order in
which they are presented. Tickets may
be procured for "Fools' Paradise" by
presenting these slips at Hill audi-
torium box office in accordance with
the following schedule, slips marked
1 to 100, March 12, 2 to 3 o'clock; 101
to 200, March 12, 3 to 4 o'clock; 201
to 300, March 12, 3 to 5 o'clock; 301
to 400, March 13, 1 to 2 o'clock; 401
to 500, March 13, 2 to 3 o'clock; 501
to 600, March 13, 3 to 4 o'clock; 601
to 1,000, March 13, 4 to 5 o'clock.
Those who have yearly memberships
have not as yet received slips, but will
get them at the Union desk, starting
at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon, March
10. These will be already marked and
will be presented at the Hill auditor-
ium box office in accordance with the
following schedule: Slips marked 1 to
150, Wednesday, March 14, 1 to 2
o'clock; 151 to 301, March 14, 2 to 3
o'clock; 301 to 450, March 14, 3 to 4
o'clock; 451 to 600, March 14, 4 to 5
o'clock; \601 to 750, March 15, 1 to 2
o'clock; 751 to 900, March 15, 2 to 3
o'clock; 901 to 1,050, March 15, 3 to 4
o'clock; 1,051 to 1,500, March 15, 4 to
5 o'clock.
Women of the University can get
tickets by first getting slips at Bar-
bour gymnasium on and after March
10, and exchanging these slips for
tickets at Hill auditorium from 2 to 5
o'clock, Friday afternoon, March 16
The general seat sale opens at 10
o'clock Saturday morning, March 17,
at Whitney theater.
Orders for the big "one night come-
back" performance to be given Wed-
nesday, March 21, will be filled as they
are received. The Allmendinger mu-
sic shop has also been added to the
places at which envelopes for order-
ing seats for this performance can be
procured.
CHICAGO AND MICHIGAN GLEE
CLUBS GIVE COMBINED SING
The combined Glee clubs of the Uni-
bersity of Michigan and the University
of Chicago will give an interconfer-
ence concert in Ann Arbor after the
Easter recess, according to present in-
dications.
At the club's meeting Monday night,
favorable action was taken. - Maurice
Nichols, '17, manager of the Glee club,
announces that a return engagement
will be given at the University of Chi-

cago in 1918, should the combined
concert prove successful.
Canadian Club Committee Will Nee#
Announcement has been made to the
effect that there will be an importane
meeting of the executive committee
of the Canadian club at 7 o'clock this
evening at the Union. All members
of the committee are urgently request-
ed to attend.

The program at the faculty concert
this afternoon in Hill auditorium will
be given by two guest soloists, Mr.
Henry B. Vincent, organist, of Erie,
Pa., and Miss Elizabeth Bennett, con-
tralto, of Detroit.
An interesting program has been
arranged and the concert will begin
at 4:15 o'clock. The general public is
cordially invited to attend.
Foresters Can Secure Summer Jobs
Students in the forestry department
will be able to secure employment this
summer with the United States for-
estry service in California, -according
to Prof. O. L. Sponsler of the forestry
department. It is the policy of the
United States forest service to survey
the grazing lands annually and de-
~ f---------------1

At the meeting of Toastmasters held
last night at the Catalpa Inn, Thomas
F. McAllister, '18, and Waldo M. Mc-
kee, '18E, were initiated into the so-
ciety. Harrison L. McCarthy, '17L,
acted as toastmaster of the evening
and after. the banquet there was a
program of informal speeches, several
members responding to toasts. The
dinner was concluded with the singing
of several of the old college songs.
0. S. Whittemore, '12L, Dies in Owosso
Word.has been received of the death
of Olin Sidney Whittemore, '12L. Aft-
er practicing law for several years at
St. Ignace, he became connected with
the Goodrich Rubber company, of De-
troit. He passed away Feb. 25, at the
home of his mother in Owosso, after a
lingering illness.

Rt. Rev. Edward D. Kelly,"D.D.
Will Address
Catholic Students Club
ont

"llie Age of the World"

Wed., Mar. 7, at 7:30

K. of C. Parlors
(Cor. Division and Huron)

! 1 fM IrYll i y

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