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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 06, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


'CHIGAN DAILY

1 nl

s .I HIA AL

I

.9

i

SPRING
SHOWING

Calkins

Calkins' Cough Balsam

Cordovans

Drug

Has relieved lots of coughs
and colds, and it is always
a safe thing to try.'

Co-

25c

We have just received
another shipment of
this popular shoe in
BLACK and TAN.
Special Agency Nettleton shoes

'

324 S. State St. or 1123 S. University Ave.

I

of the new

U1

1: :~
.~2~inai'i KAouiies

CRISIS REACHED SAS
CHIAGOBANK LETTER
SHORTAGE OF FREIGHT CAiRS
CHIEF CAUSE OF SIT-
UATION

i
i

I tcvecoltcgtate

WAHR'S Shoe Stores
Main St. State St.

$20 to $40

Lindenschmidt, Apfel Co.
At Fourth Ave. and Liberty St.
Laboratory Supplies

According to a news letter issued
by the National City bank of Chicago,
trade and labor conditions in this
country have reached a crisis. The
present shortage of freight cars is
given as the chief cause of this un-
precedented situation.
On Feb. 1, the shortage of cars was
stated as 109,770. This number was
twice as large as the shortage report-
ed on Jan. 1. It must be also taken
into consideration that American rail-
roads have never before reported a
shortage of cars in the month of
February.
As a result of this lack of cars, and
the subsequent embargoes issued by
the railroads, 80,000,000 bushels of
grain have been retained in elevators
and cars. The coal shortage has
proven equally disastrous to manufac-
turers.
Labor conditions also occupy a
prominent place in our present econ-
omic status. Wages have passed the
high-water mark. It will be one of
the most difficult of the after-war pro-
blems to readjust this abnormal con-
dition.

Oregon: A printing exhibition, said
to be the best ever shown in the West,
has been brought to the University of
Oregon by the school of journalism
and the department of art apprecia-
tion.
Princeton: A campaign to raise an
additional $3,000,000 for the endow-
ment fund for professors' salaries and
the purchase of books for the univer-
sity library will be launched soon.
President Hibben says that the high
cost of living has resulted in an an-
nual deficit of hundreds of thousands
Df dollars in faculty salaries.
Illinois: The first annual automo-
bile- show of Champaign is being held
in the gymnasium annex.
Wisconsin: The entire proceeds of
next Saturday's mixer will be donated
by the women of the university to
help meet the deficit created by this
year's football banquet.
Minnesota: The freshmen have peti-
tioned the student council to have
their class brought under the honor
system of the university.
Iariard: Permanent business posi-
tions were secured for 221 Harvard
graduates during the year 1915-16 by
the appointment office of the alumni
association, according to the annual
report of that office.
Pennsylvania: The nien taking mil-
itary training have appointed a mili-
tary committee which will endeavor to
secure for the student battalion cer-
tain halls for drill purposes which
have been denied them heretofore.

CityNews
The primary election for Washtenaw
county to elect one circuit judge for
the twenty-second judicial court of
Michigan and two auditors for the
county will be held-tomorrow. Owing
to the recent ruling of thersupreme
court that in case that there is only
one candidate, there need not be any
primary, the city primaries have been
discarded. The following are the pools
of the different wards of the city:
First, voting room basement of the
city hall; second, ward building, South
Ashley street; third, ward building on
Miller avenue; fourth, voting room,
basement of Armory on Fifth avenue;
Fifth, ward building,,on Swift street;
ixth, basement of Tappan school on
East University avenue; seventh, ward
building, Mary street. The regular
election will be held April 2.
,The Ann Arbor Civic association is
planning a municipal exhibit to be
held the last week of this month. The
object of the movement is to make a
closer union between tbe citizen and
taxpayer and the city government by
familarizing the public with the var-
ious branches of the city's activities.
The association has already appro-
priated $150 towards the exhibit.

r
Fitform Clot~es
First Showing
of
S3pring Clothes

mlmm

Chemicals

- Drugs - Toilet Articles
and Drug Sundries

The Eberbach & Son Co.

"

What about that

New

Suit for Spring

We have 'some beauties at $20,$22.50 and $25
made to your measure by the Royal Tailors of
Chicago.
Drop in and look them over wheither it be a
New or Staple Pattern we have it.
Ca mpus Booery
308 S. State St. Opposite Huston's
Bostoaian and Florsheim Shoes
(NEW SPRING STYLES)

Omwwmmwmm

rn-rnmwm

One of Our Dinners
Served from 11 to- 7
Regu ar Dinner 35c consists choice of
meats; mashed or boiled potatoes; one
vegetable; choice of pie or pudding; tea,
c'~fee, or. milk.
SPECIALS, as served
Soup .io with meat order .05
Roast or Fricassee of chicken .25
Roast Prime Ribs of Beef .25
Roast Leg (f Veal with Dressing .25
Pork Sausage with Sweet Potatoes .25
Pork Chops Breaded. Extra Special .25
Small Steak with Onions. Ex. Spe'l .25
Bread and Mashed Potatoes included
with above meat orders.
Side Orders Extra
Potatoes mashed .05 Stewed tomatoes .05
Potatoes boiled o5 Stewed corn .05
Potatoes fried .o5 Stewed peas .05
Potatoes german fi ed .o5

MARQUARDT a n d
P"~FUCTION a r e-
synonimous thoughts
in the minds of those
who lan to purchase
the foxiest in spring
clothes.
MARQUARDT
CAMPUS TAILOR
516 E. WILLIAM ST.

HE A D OF WOMEN VOCATION
BUREAU TO BE HERE MARCH 13
Mary Malcomson, '12, head of the
bureau of vocations for college wo-
men in Detroit, will be in Ann Arbor
March 13, for personal interviews
in the parlor of Barbour gymnasium.
Applications for all kinds of posi-
tions except teaching will be consider-
ed if the applicant has had a personal
interview. The bureau is open to both
graduate and undergraduate students
and for summer positions as well a
permanent work.
To arrange for consultation periods
telephone Elsie Paul, '17.
PROFESSOR WATERMAN TALKS
ON "THE FIRST UNITARIAN"
"The First Unitarian," was the sub-
ject of an address given by Prof.
Leroy Waterman Sunday evening be-
fore the Students' society of the Uni-
tarian church.
Professor Waterman described the
religion of Egpyt as consisting of many
gods previous to 1350 B. C. About this
'time Ikhanoton became ruler of the
Egyptian Empire and purified the re-
ligion. This, the speaker said, was the
first attempt to stop religious disin-
tegration. Iloweve , the efforts of
lkhanoton were pre ature and the old
religion was re-established.
WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY TRIES
PRIMARIES IN ELECTIONS
Madison, Wis., March 5.-Nomina-
tion and election of class officers by
ballotting at polls provided for that
purpose is being tried out by the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin, with but indif-
ferent success so far.
The plan used is to hold primaries
first, at which time all students can
vote for their choice for the various
officers in their class. The three re-
ceiving the largest number of votes
in each instance are the nominees fort
the position and are voted on at a
regular election ballot.l
Mathematicians to Meet in Chicago
Chicago, March 5.-The next sum-
mer meeting of the American Mathe-
matical society will be held at the
University of Chicago in 1919, at theT
invitation of the university mathe-t
matics department.
Use the advertising columns of Ther
Michigan Daily in order to reach the
best of AnnArbor's buyers.

TUBERCULOSIS SURVEY BILL
MEETS OPPOSITION AT LANSING
Lansing, March 5.-Except for peo-
ple all over the state who are inter-
ested in the anti-tuberculosis move-
ment, no one is "lobbying" for the
tuberculosis survey bill that has been
introduced in the senate by Senator
Murtha of Detroit. Numerous letters
and resolutions are coming into Lan-
sing calling for a continuation of the
work that the 1915 legislature began.
The state health workers themselves
are leaving the matter to the people
of the state who are interested, while
they are at work as usual "in the field"
naking examinations, giving health
addresses, organizing free local clinics
and other public health organizations.
Dr. De Kleine himself is examining
from 20 to 30 persons a day in the
county surveys, and several other phy-
sicians are doing the same.
If the bill for the continuation of
this service passes it will be due to
interest on the part of health workers
all over the state. As was expected,
opposition to the bill has arisen, but
the fact is pointed out that the best
endorsement of the value of the sur-
vey lies in the fact that a large num-
ber of the counties where campaigns
were held are clamoring for a "return
engagement."
WO)TEN'S LEAGUE OFFERS FIVE
DOLLARS FOR BEST CLASS SONGS<

1
j

There are at the present time 14
cases of scarlet fever in the city, ac-
cording to Health Officer J. A. Wes-
singer last night. Ten of these are in
the University hospital. Helen M.
Blain, of the School of Music, is at her
home at 502 East Jefferson avenue;
Travis F. Beal, '17, is at his home at
343 South Fifth street; Harold Groves,
'16, at 110 South Twelfth street; and
Hortense Hoad, daughter of Prof. W.
C. Hoad of the engineering college, at
her home at 328 Huron street. Ernest
Streeter, 506 West Liberty street, is
confined to his home with smallpox.
He was one of the carpenters on the
University general library.
Fire which broke out in the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Stauch, 803
Brooks street, Sunday night caused
$500 damage.
Mrs. Etta Morrish, wife of George
Morrish, 213 East Kingsley street, is
dead at the home of her parents in
Kalkaska, Mich. She left Ann Arbor
last week to visit them.
Bonds to the amount of $40,000 for
the erection of a new county, infirm-
ary have been printed and sent to the
Cummings, Prudden company of Tole-
do, purchasers.
PROF. ADAMS LECTURES TODAY
ON OLD FRENCH LITERATURE

TOP COATS
in the city.

Also a big line of the
New Spring Hats,
Caps, and Furnish-
ings.

The Ann Arbor Civic association
will hold its annual banquet April
4. The following members have been
appointed to take charge of the affair:
Fremont Ward, chairman; G. W. Lang-
ford, F. J. Muehling, R. E. Reichart,
E. A. Schaeberle, R. A. Dolph, Fred
Heusel.

We are

nobbiest line of
SPRING SUITS

and

showing the

TOM CORBETT
116 E. Liberty St.

Hohte made pies per cut .05
tard .05, with cream o0
Coffee .05 Tea .05
Milk per bottle .05
TATE L
SCREET LUN
Open All Night. J. A. QUAC

Rice cus-I

Chocolate .05
Cocoa .io
CH
KENBUSH, Mgr.

idea of what the University of Kanoas
is doing is being contemplated by the
men's student council of that univer-
sity. Such an exposition was held in
1913, and it is planned to make it an
annual affair, at which time outsiders
may come to visit and learn the in-
side workings of the university, and
give suggestions for its betterment.

Kansas Student Council Plans Expo,
Lawrence, Kan., March '5.-A uni-
versity exposition to give the people
of the state of Kansas a more adequate

Patronize Daily Advertisers.

Leave Copy LASSIFIE Leave Copy
at at
Quarry's and Students'
The Delta Supply Store,
4ADVERTISING ppy

The athletic committee of the Wo-
men's league has offered prizes
amounting to $5.00 for songs to be
sung at the approaching big games
of the basketball season. A dollar
prize will be given to the best song
from each class and $2.00 to the best
of these four. Songs should be handed
in this week to members of the ath-
letic committee.
MEAD, '18, MARRIED TO MISS
ETHEL FRENCH OF CLEVELAND
Roy S. Mead, '18E, was married to
Miss Ethel French of Cleveland Sat-
urday evening. Mead left college last-
semester to accept a position in Cleve-
land. He is a member of the Phi Delta
Theta fraternity.
Try The Daily for service.

J "ie Young Hen's Shop"
HARVARD STUDENTS DISAGREE
IN CONCEPTS OF NEUTRALITY
Cambridge, Mass., March 5.--During
the enrollment for the Reserve Officers
Training corps here a small band of
undergraduates organized the Harvard
union for American neutrality, and
placarded college buildings and shop
windows in the vicinity of Harvard
Square with declarations of their be-
liefs. The placards read as follows:
The Harvard union of American
neutrality believes that:
1. War need not follow the break
with Germany.
2. War with Germany cannot estb-
lish neutrals' rights.
3. Retaliation is not the highest
form of honor.
4. Democracy demands a referen-
dum before war.

WANTED

"Aucassin and Nicollete," and
Song of Roland" to Be
Discussed

"The

WANTED- Two students to attend
furnaces for room. Engineering stu-
dents preferred. Phone 271 or call
201 First National Bank Building, 6
WANTED-Fellows- before deciding

RISCELLANEOUS
PRIVATE BOARD $5 weekly. Inquire
at 410 Church St. Phone 450-R.
1-10 incl
ANYONE HAVING a big old-fashioned
quilt left by mistake at their home
by the Ann Arbor Steam Dye Works,
please call 1719-M. 6-7
FOU BALE

Prof. Edward L. Adams lectures on
"Two Masterpieces of Old French Lit-
erature" at 5 o'clock this afternoon in
Tappan hall. Through an error in The
Daily, the lecture was previously an-
nounced for next Thursday.
Professor Adams will summarize
and criticize "Aucassin and Nicollete"
and "The Song of Roland," two of the
most ancient relics of French liter-
ature.
The lecture is in charge of the
Cercle Francais and will be delivered
in French. It is open to the campus
and tickets can be secured at the door.
Lecture on British Nation Postponed
The lecture on "The British Em-
pire, Commonwealth or Dominion," by
Mr. S. K, Ratcliffe, which was to have
been given yesterday, has been post-
poned until Monday, March 12.
For fine Watch Repairing, J. L.<
Chapman, Jeweler, 113 S. Main St. tfi
Try The Daily for service.j

", I "I loom" I

Grinnell Bros.' Music House

Posted as conspicuously as the first
declaration, and printed in yellow ink,
appeared the ironic counter-platform
of the Harvard union for American
nincompoops, which reads as follows:
1. This country should. invite the
Kaiser to annex it.
2. The best way to aid the cause of
neutrality is by bending the knee and
not by arching the back.
3. It is unladylike to stand up for
our rights.
4. Demoralization demands that we
should not bear arms.
More than 1,000 students have join-
ed the training corps and are devoting
nine hours to drills and lectures. In
addition to those enrolled in this corps,
nearly 100 students. have joined the
aviation corps, and will have aero-
plane work next summer.

on summer employment, see
$6.00 per day propdsition. No
perience required. It's on
square. F. B. Crill, 1580-M.

me.
ex-
the
6-7

See us for anything in the
Realm of Music

rVX K1 XT
FOR RENT-Exceptional room near
campus. Mrs. 0. P. Burgess. 802
Monroe. 4-6

FOR SALE-Five new Olivers, num-
ber nines. Five bargains for five
persons needing typewriters. -Ham-
ilton Business College, State and
William. 2-8

TRY OUR VICTOR RECORD APPROVAL SERVICE
For March Records out February 28th

116 S. Main St.

Phone 1707

I

p. i

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