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March 04, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-04

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COLDER
TODAY

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UNITED PRES
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 106. ANN ARBOR, MICH[GAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 1917. PRICE FIVE CE

AHME NEUTHALITY
MEASURE MAY FALL
BEFORE FILIBUSTER
INDEPENDENT REPUBLICAN SEN-
ATORS MENACE WILSON'S
PROJECT
DEMOCRATS TRY TO
REACH COMPROMISE
LaFollette, Gronna, Norris, Cummins
and Others Take Lead in Fight
to Get Extra Session
By ROBERT J. BENDER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, March 3. -Absolute
confidence in the passage of the armed
neutrality measure changed to a grave
doubt tonight that it would be able to
survive the filibustering tactics
launched by independent Republicans
in an effort to force an extra session.
Democratic leaders late tonight
were so fearful that the measure'
might fail that they began making
offers to the Republicans in an effort
to reach a common ground. Negotia-
tions were started when it became evi-
dent that certain Republicans would
talk the bill to death if possible. These
Republicans declared their intention
on the floor of the senate.
Democrats Concede
While Democratic leaders were reti-
cent as to what advances they had
made to the other slde, it was learned
the Republicans were given the op-
portunity to change the measure to
satisfy themselves, so long as the, two
principal contentions of the president,
power and the vote of credit, were
left in.
The Democrats offered to withdraw
from their heretofore unequivocal
stand on the senate resolution, and t
take the house measure, which strikes
out the "other instrumentalities"
clause, and provides that munition
ships shall not be armed or convoyed.
The president sent word again to
Democratic leaders through Secre-
tary McAdoo that neither side need
have any fear that he will precipitate
actual warfare without first calling
the new congress together for con-
sideration and advice.

Former Stars to
Appear in Opera
Alumni Attempt "One Night Come-
Back" and Render Old
Song Hits
Eight stars of past operas will at-
tempt a "one night come-back" be-
tween the acts of "Fools' Paradise"
when it appears Wednesday evening,
March 21, in the Whitney theater.
They are: Durward Grimstead, Edgar
Bowen, Fred Lawton, Frank Bach-
mann, Waldo Fellows, Donald Haines,
Roy Scanlon, and George McMahon.
These graduates, and many others,
will appear in the boxes, and expect
to give between the acts the songs in
which they formerly featured. The
evening will mark the tenth anniver-
sary of the founding of the Mimes of
the University of Michigan Union. 1
Mail orders for this performance'
alone will be filled in the order in
which they are received prior to the
opening of the box office sales. Spe-
cial envelopes to be used in getting
tickets for this night have been pro-
vided and can be procured at any of
the following places: Either of Wahr's
book stores, the Grinnell music store,
Schaeberle's music store, Mack's or
the Union desk.
All members of the cast will meet
at 2 o'clock today at the Union.
NAVAL RESERVES TO
GIVE FORMAL BALL

TEUTONS UPHOLD STAND
Of FOREIGN SECRETARY
PRESS AND PUBLIC FEEL COURSE
TAKEN BY U. S. GAVE
GROUNDS
Berlin, March 3.-Germany accepts
Foreign Secretary Zimmerman's ex-
planation that Germany's move for a
Mexican-Japanese alliance against
America was justified.
Editorial comment today on the
American revelations of Zimmerman's
plan, together with Zimmerman's ex-
planation, indicated unity of belief in
holding Germany not exceeding her
right in such a plan, while it specific-
ally stated the plot was not to be car-
ried out unless American declared
war. Press and public alike agreed
that America's course in breaking re-
lations with Germany gave Germany
ground for taking precautionary meas-
ures.
PRINCETON SENIORS
AGAINST SOCIETIES

DENIES LETTER
Mexico City, March 3.-Mex.
ico will inform all nations that
proposition was received from
Germany to make war on the
United States, in the event of
hostilities between that coun-
try and Germany. While the
greatest interest was manifest-
ed in the statement that For-
eign Secretary Zimmerman had
sent a letter to the German
min-ister here suggesting war
by Mexico, officials were unan-
imous in stating that no such
communication was received.
PROF, 1 g[ALEN STTES
WORK of AN ENGINEER
"ENGINEERING AS A PROFESSION"
WILL BE SUBJECT OF
ADDRESS
The first of a series of five lectures
upon the various professions, to be
held under the auspices of the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A., will be given at
6:30 o'clock this evening in Lane hall
by Prof. John R. Allen of the engi-
neering college on the subject "En-
gineering as a Profession."
Several musical numbers will form
part of tonight's program. Frank W.
Grover, '18, Robert R. Dieterle, '18, and
selected violin trios will furnish mu-
sic during the month.

VARSITY TRACK TEAM TAKES ONE
FIRST, TIES NOTEAND GETS
FOUR MORE POINTS AT ILLINDI1

Richard
dent,

Cleveland, Son of ex-Presi-
with Fellow Sophomores
'lake First Steps

Gov. Sleeper and Commissioned
fivers Will Be Asked to At-
tend at Armory

Of-

SPEAKS

AT PURDUE

"Michigan and the Big Nine" Subject
of Dunne's Talk at Coun-
cil Conference
"Michigan and the Big Nine" was
the . subject of Maurice F. Dunne's
talk at the opening meeting Thursday
night of the conference of student
councils, held at Purdue last week,
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.
Dunne briefly reviewed the history
of the Big Nine conference until 1905,
when Michigan withdrew. In his
statements, Dunne said that the rea-
son for Michigan's withdrawal was
the conference three-year ruling which
would have made 12 men ineligible.
Twofold benefits were derived from
the eastern affiliations, Dunne stated:
Eastern ideas were introduced into
Michigan and the east awoke to the
realization of the western standard of
athletics.
In concluding his remarks, Dunne
said, "The students, faculty, and
alumni are now almost unanimously
in favor of changing the Big Nine to
the Big Ten, and beat or be beaten by
their neighboring universities."
Representatives from 16 univer-
sities attended the conference,, which
is heldhannually among the confer-
ence schools..
Masons Hear Address by Rev. Loring
The Rev. R. S. Loring of the Uni-
tarian church addressed student Ma-
sons of the University last night at
the Masonic temple on the subject
"Reflections of a Mason."

Michigan's first military ball, and
the first to be given in any university
in the United States under the auspices
of the navy department, will be held
at the Armory on the evening of
March 23 under the management of the
Sex>nth and Eighth divisions of the
First battalion of the Michigan naval
reserve.
Uniforms for the occasion are to be
service blues, with the officers wear-
ing gold-braided dress uniforms.
Formal dress is to be worn by all
cther guests present at the ball.
Admission will be strictly by invita-
tion, the tickets being limited to 200.
Committeemen in charge of the ball
are as follows: Leslie G. Field, '19L,
chairman; John D. Van Schoick, '17M,
Carl H. Knight, '19E, H. Mason Lums-
den, '19F, and Archibald G. Wenley,
'20.
The military personnel includes
Adjutant-General Colonel John S.
Bersey, Quartermaster-General Wil-
liam Rogers, Commander J. Farrand
Lewis, and the entire commissioned
staff of the state of Michigan.
Governor Sleeper has been extended
an invitation to attend the ball.
INSURANCE COMPANIES PAY
MICHIGAN UNION $10,702.80
Slightly increasing the first estimate
of damages done to the Michigan
Union by fire, the insurance companies
paid the club $5,756.80 on the build-
ing and $4,946 on contents, making a
total of $10,702.80. The money was
awarded after contractors had calcu-
lated the cost of repairing the hall and
replacing decorations. c-
The Union board of control dele-
gated the building committee to pro-
ceed with the reconstruction. A met-
ing of thebuilding committee prob-
ably will be held tomorrow, at which
time the contract for repairing the
clubhouse will be let.
Burns Talks on Kentucky Mountaineer
James A. Burns, president of Oneida
institute, speaks at 7:30 o'clock tonight
in the Presbyterian church on "The
Remaking of the Kentucky Moun-
taineer." He is a personal friend of
Prof. W. D. Henderson of the engineer-
ing college.

Princeton, N. J., March 3.-Claiming
that the present club system fosters
extravagance and creates artificial
standards, seven of Princeton's prom-
inent seniors have handed Jn their
resignations to upper class societies.
This marks the second step ,n the re-
volt against existing social conditions
at Princeton.
The first step was taken when Rich-
ard Cleveland, son of the late Grover
Cleveland, together with a small nvm-
ber of his fellow sophomores declared
early in January that they would not
accept membership in any of the upper
class societies.
'Thoe who are mo-st viclwntiy:
posed to the present system beieve
that the whole institution toge'hsr
with the club houses, valued at $1 0,-
004, should be swept out of the coY e e
life Otlhr f al n pttst evto rt;ild

,.hese Will Appear in "Band Bounce"
Friday, March 9
. P tb 1unt g strains of ra-time
and a variety of "Frenchy" dances,
featuring fair divinities of the cam-
pus, the annual "Band Bounce" will
..ahe its appearance next Friday even-

RAGS,

GIRLS,

be introduced by still using; tc club ing, March 9, in Hill auditorium. -
buildirgs, but having them under uni- Whit promises to be one of the
versity control and management. cleverest numbers is a Pierrot and Co-
--~ --lumbine act to be presented by Helen
GOETHALS TO COME McAndrew, '19, and Genevieve O'Leary,
'17, in costumes which are said to be
unusually alluring.
Canal Engineer Will Explain Strategic Morrison Wood, '17, and Eva Bowen,
Features of Shipway '18, are to feature a comedy sketch in
songs, jokes, and original dialogue.
America's recent international com- James H. Stephens, '18E, will .ap-
plications and the danger of becoming pear in a special mandolin harmony
embroiled in a war, especially in view act, while a vaudeville skit with a
of the recently uncovered plot to in- number of original songs will be pre-
duce Japan and Mexico to war against seated by Louis Emerman, '18L. Three
the United States, have evoked addi- of Dr May's proteges will be seen in a
tional interest in the coming of Gen- series of gymnastic feats.
eral Goethals, who will speak on the For ragtime, 'Hep, Ingham's Jazz
strategic, military and constructive orchestra, will strum the catchy tunes
features of the Panama canal March of the hour with banjos, violins, and
14 in Hill auditorium. ukeleles.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron end Division
7:30 JAMES A. BURNS "'Buis of the Mountains"
1:30 Communion Service

BAND

NEW CARBURETOR
SPRAYS COAL OIL
Tests in a Ford Show Average of 25
Miles to Gallon at Cost
of 12 Cents
A carburetor adapted to the use of
kerosene is said to have proved prac-
tical in severe tests stretching over a
year, has been perfected by Prof. John
R. Allen of the engineering college, it
was announced Saturday, Patents for
the invention arrived several days ago.
New features of the carburetor con-
sist in the use of moistened air, to
prevent carbonization, and in a device
that causes the mixture of air and
gas to enter the cylinders at an even
temperature. Tests in a Ford ma-
chine last fall showed an average of
25 miles on a gallon of kerosene, when
the car was equipped with the new
carburetor, and 20 miles on a gallon
of gasoline, with an ordinary car-
buretor. Kerosene costs 12 cents a
gallon, while the price of gasoline is
22 cents a gallon.
A Detroit accessory firm has ar-
ranged to place the device on the mar-
ket within a short time. The patents
were awarded to William Greitcheit,
former chauffeur to President Taft,
who conceived the idea and sent it
to the University for development.
NEW "POSTWOMAN" SERVICE
TO REPLACE PARIS POSTMEN
Paris, March 3.-Women letter car-
riers soon will be delivering mail in
Paris. This method will be an experi-
ment and preferenc will be given to
the wives of soldiers. Some doubt
has been exressed as to whether the
women will be able to shoulder the
wooden box that the Paris postmen
carry, without being too greatly fa-
tigued.
Recently women tried to replace the
postmen at Neuilly, a suburb of Paris,
but they lasted only three days. The
postal administration, however, hopes
that the Paris experiment will be more
successful.
WALTER K. TOWERS, '12L, WILL
TALK BEFORE TRYADS TUESDAY
Walter K. Towers, '12L, of Detroit,
managing editor of the American Boy,
will speak to the members of the Try-
ads club in room 162 natural science
building on "Advertising Agencies,"
Tuesday, March 13. Mr. Towers was
managing editor of The Michigan Daily
in 1912 and since his -raduation has
always been interested in the student
publications, now being editor of the
Michigander.
MAJESTIC REFU NS MONEY TO
PATRONS OF VjLTED SHOW
Waiting patrons were turned away
from the Majestic's second show last
evening, after their money had been
refunded at the box office, because the
theater manager deemed it inadvisable
to continue with the second perform-
ance after an alleged unsportsman-like
behavior on the part of some of the
audience which precluded one of the
acts on the bill.
"Report Two Interned Ships Disabled
Galveston, March 3.-The Austrian
steamers Companion and Morawitz,
interned here, have been disabled
within the last three weeks, accord-
ing to semi-official statements made
here today. These statements say the
engines of the Austrian steamers have
been put out -ofcommission and the
vessels otherwise injured.

CEC CROSS THROWS SHOT 44 FEE
TO-WIN FIRST
PLACE
BARELY LOSES HOT °
MILE RELAY EVEN']
Vie Simmons Equals Leading Jumper
with Height of 6 Feet
11-2 Inches
By T. Hawley Tapping, '16L
Champaign, Ill., March 3.-(Special
-Michigan emerged from her resumi
tion of relations with conference team
tonight with a tie for first in the hig
jump, first and third in the shot, an
second in the mile relay.
Vic Simmons eclipsed all expects
tiois of Wolverine students here b
clearing the bar at 6 feet 11-2 inchee
Three other athletes tied with Si
mons for premier honors-Treweeke o
Kansas, Webster of Illinois, and Mshe
of Chicago.
Chicago gathered the greatest tots
of points with 261-4. Illinois pulle
up in second place with a 16 1-4 tota
Due to the supreme efforts of Capta
Smith, Wisconsin was able to nose o
just ahead of Michigan, accumulatin
an even dozen to 111-4 for the Wo
verines.
Captain Ames of Illinois 'brougi
joy to local followers by founding
-new-American amateur record in t
75-yard high hurdles. The time wa
9 3-5 seconds, one-fifth second bette
than the Illini captain has done thi
season.
Cross Wins Shot Put
'Cross of Michigan took first in tb
shot, with Higgins of Chicago secon
followed by Smith, also of the Wolvei
ines.
Chicago nosed out the Wolverine
in the mile relay with a great bit o
running by their colored star, Dis
mond. Hardell passed the baton t
Huntington in fourth place, but tb
Michigan man moved up two places be
fore Fontanna relieved him. Sta
passed Feuerstein of the Maroon qua
tet in the middle of his race, givin
Scofield a five-yard lead. With 4,04J
spectators crying.madly for a Mich
gian victory, Binga Dismond prove
too much for Scofield and Michiga
had to content herself with secon
O'Brien failed to qualify in the final
in the 75-yard dash after placing thi
in the first heat. Mulligan of Not
Dame, and Hoyt of Grinnell put Ob
out of it in eight seconds.
Kesler Drops at 11-foot Mark
Kesler, lone Wolverine entry in t
pole vault, was dropped after clearin
11 feet. Beardsley failed to qualify I
either of the hurdles.
Michigan was swamped in the tw4
mile relay, finishing last. Bouma w
last in the opener, but Sedgwick pick
up a place. Fox dropped back agal
too much for Captain' Carroll t
make up.
Four thousand spectators witnessE
the first big meet in the mammo
new armory. Cheering was not coi
certed, due to the fact that each t
the leading contestants had ma
supporters present.
Cheers for Wolverines
The Wolverines were loudly cheer<
each time any of their men gave proi
ise of doing anything to place.
Treweeke of Kansas and Capta
Smith of Wisconsin were individu
stars of the meet.
The summries:
Two-mile relay-Notre Dame (M
Donough, Kasper, Noonan, Meehan
first; Chicago, second; Kansas, thir
Time-8 minutes 9 3-5 seconds.
75-yard dash-Smith (Wisconsin
first; Hewing (Indiana), secon
Casey (Wisconsin, third. Time-

74-5 seconds.
(Continued on Page Six.)

Noon: Prof. THEO. R. RUNNING
Classes - Another' World.

speak to Bible

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
!all'
,,-
LUCIA AMES MEAD
Secretary of the Woman's Peace Party
SUBJECT:
i The World's Crisis AND America's Duty
r,u n ml
m Tonight * . Tonight
7:30 Methodist Church 7:30 I
1 I N 311

I

THE MIMES OF THE iCHIGAN UNION PRESENT

SA
~C

FOAL '

AHDCE

WHITNEY. THEATRE

. 7
"
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ti : '

MARCH 21.2-3-4

4

MATINEE, MARCH 24

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