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March 02, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-02

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

r Sir

A6F

UNITED PRE:
DAY AND NIGHIT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 104. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1917. PRICE FIVE

1 s 1 I

MEXICO AND JAPAN
.INNOCENT OF PLOT
~~Y AMBSADR
EMBASSIES ISSUE STATEMENTS
DENYING COMPLICITY
WITH GERMANY
SECRET SERVICE MEN
STOPGERMAN LETTER
Communication Said to Be Written by
von Berustorff Invites Combina-
tion in Case of War
New York via London, March 1.
-The British steamer Galcorm-
castle was shelled and sunk.
American members of the crew
are missing. Two other Ameri-
cans were landed.
Washington, March 1. - Pledging
continued friendship to the United
States and continuance of its relations
with the allies, the Japanese embassy
this afternoon issued a formal state-
ment declaring that "under no circum-
stances would the Japanese govern-
ment entertain such an invitation as
Germany attempted to send to Tokio."
The statement read: "With regard
to the alleged German attempt at in-
ducing Japan and Mexico to make
war upon the United States made pub-
lie in the press this morning, the
Japanese embassy, while lacking in-
formation as to whether such invita-
tion reached Tokio, desires to state
mst emphatically that any invitation
of this sort would under no circum-
stances be entertained by the Japanese
government which is in entire accord
and close relations with the allied
powers on account of formal agree-
ment and common causes, and, more-
over, whose friendship with the United
States is every day growing in sincer
ity and cordiality."
Mexican Diplomat Denies Plot Story
Washington, March 1.-Flat denial
that his government participated in
any manner in the German plot
against the United States was made
this afternoon by Mexican Charge de
Affairs Ramon de Negri at the Mexi-
can embassy said: "I desire to deny
the participation of my government in
the plot reported in the morning pa-
pers. I expect the official denial of
my government will be made in the
reply to the report which I have for-
warded to the foreign office. That re-
ply I believe, will reach Washington
late this afternoon."
Senators Suggest Scheme of Allies
Washington, March 1.-While the
house pushed forward the armed neu-
trality bill this afternoon, Senator
Stone, chairman of the senate foreign
relations committee, speaking in the
senate intimated that the Zimmerman
Mexican-Japanese plot letter might
have come from entente sources, and
therefor be subject to some doubt as
to its authenticity.
New York, March 1.-The German
plot to allign Mexico and Japan
aganst the .United States in the event
of war between the latter country and
Germany was discovered by United
States secret service agents, according
to a Washington dispatch to the New
York Evening Post. "The single out-

standing fact is that the United States
government, through its own secret
agents, intercepted a letter sent in the
unquestionable handwriting of Count
von- Berustorff, the former German
American ambassador here, instruct-
ing the German minister at Mexico
City, Baron von Eckhardt, to begin im-
mediate negotiations with the Car-
ranza government should hostilities
occur between the United States and
Germany on account of the recently
announced submarine warfare." The
Post declares: "There is nothing to
show that the German minister actual-
ly received the letter intended for him,
though Secretary Lansing thinks he
did."
Prof. H. L. Wilgus Addresses Woolsack
Professor Horace L. Wilgus of the
Law school addressed the members of.
Woolsack, junior law honorary society,
at its first informal meeting and
smoker of the second semester in Lane.

Says President
Asks to Resign
Rumored University Head Frill Retire
At Close of Present
Semester-
Rumor to the effect that President
Harry B. Hutchins had petitioned the
board of regents for leave to re--
tire from his duties at the close of the
present semester first reached, the
campus yesterday through the medium
of a Detroit newspaper.
President Hutchins refused to con-
firm or deny the report, merely reply-
ing that hea"had nothing to say in
the matter at all."
The account as given in the columns
of the paper purports to come from an.
admission made by retiring Regent
Bulkley, who is said to have asserted
that the Regents are even now consid-
ering a number of prominent educa-
tors for the vacancy, most prominent
among whom is James R. Angell, dean
of the university faculties at the Uni-
versity of Chicago, and who is the
son oflate President-Emeritus James
B. Angell.
TAU BETA PI TAKES
IN ELEVEN JUNIORS
National Scholarship Fraternity Picks
Men for Annual Spring
Initiation
Tau Beta Pi, the national honor en-
gineering fraternity elected 11 junior
engineers at its annual spring election.
The requisites for membership to this
fraternity are based upon scholarship,
the candidates being chosen from the
highest one-eighth of the junior en-
gineering class.bThehonorand alumni
elections will be announced later.
The new men elected are: S. S. At-
vrood, W. S. Dinwiddie, W. S. McKin-
ley, C. A. Hart, P. A. Vickers, R. C.
Germanson, A. V. Livingston, J. R.
sill, W. B. Sickler, F. I. Sheahan, and
J. H. Sharpe.
The initiation will take place on
March 14
WILL ADMIT ENGINEERS TO
SENOR LIT DANCE TONIGHT
Michigan's senior lits hold their
first dance of the year tonight at the
Armory.
In view of the fact that the senior
engineers havebeendeprived oftheir
dance which was scheduled for to-
night, by the recent fire at the Mich-
igan Union, the senior lit social com-
mittee has arranged to admit a limited
number of them at the Armory.
Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Bryson and
Mr. and Mrs. Harold P. Scott will
chaperone,
Senior engineers who want tickets
for tonight's dance must see a mem-
ber of the committee. Senior lits
can procure pasteboards at Cushings,
The Busy Bee, or from one of the
members of the committee, Hobart
Birmingham, Ralph Carmen, John
Codd, and Harold Fitzgerald.
LAST DAY OF CAMPAIGN SEES
Y. M. C. A. FUND $4,770 SHORT
Twenty-five thousand two hundred-
thirty dollars is the total amount
that had been secured up until yester-
day noon by the Y. M. C. A. workers,
after a fourth day of the five day cam-
paign to secure $30,000 for the re-
equipping of the local association
building.
This is an increase of $2,269 over
the amount secured up until noon of
the previous. There yet remains $4,-
770 to be secured in order that the

campaign may be successful and the
workers have but one more day to
secure it.
HELEN BOURKE, '18, ELECTED
1917-'18 Y. W. C. A. PRESIDENT
The offices of the University Y. W.
C. A. elected yesterday for the year
1917-'18 are as follows: President,
Helen Bourke, '18; vice-president,
Hazel Beckwith, '19; secretary, Pansy
Blake, '18; treasurer, Emily Loman,
'19.
Will Begin Repairs on Union Soon
Work of repairing the Michigan
Union temporary quarters which were
damaged by fire Monday morning will
be begun within a few days, though
no contract for the job has yet been
let. It is expected* that the building
will open to Union activities by April
1.

GERMANS BLAME USo If
LA 1CONIA CAUSES WAR

LAST NORTHIRN LEAGUE
PRELIMINARY TONIGHTi

I Y

CONFERENCE

AGAIN

HAVE CONFIDENCE
RINES; SPEAKER
RESULTS

IN SUBMA-
CLAIMS

FIVE SPEAKERS DELIVER
TIONS FOR KAUFMAN
PRIZE'k

ORA-

Berlin, March 1.-If the United
States decides the sinking of the Cun-
ard liner Laconia is a cause for war
Germany will regard the responsibil-
ity for the conflict as resting upon
W'shington. In well informed circles
it was stated today that since Ger-
many has warned all neutral countries
that all ships in the war zone would
be sunk without warning, it is the
fault of neutrals if their ships are
sunk in this danger zone. The Ger-
man press and public alike take the
reports of the Americanasituation and
the impending decisions in congress
with absolute calm. The public has
great confidence in the submarine war-
fare. The great conservative leader,
Herr Heydebrand, speaking at a meet-
ing in Hamburg, said, "I have first
hand information of a result from the
submarine warfare greater than the
navy dreamed of. There is no per-
foration in our submarine warfare.
Those who enter the danger zone will
perish."
No Extra session Say Officials
Washington, March 1.-There will
be no extra session of congress. This
information was sent out officially
from the White House following the
news that a telegram was sent by
Democratic Party Whip Bell to all
Democratic members urging them to
be in readiness for a possible extra
session called March 6. Officials
claimed it was merely a precautionary
warning always taken.
California Wants Reparation
Sacremento, March 1.-Assembly-
man John Williams offered a resolu-
tion in the lower house today urging
congress to act to secure reparation
from Germany for the death of Wil-
liam Eva, a Californian, on the sub-
marined liner Laconia. The resolu-
tion declares: "The assembly of the
state of California does deeply de-
plore the dastardly act of the said
belligerent power and asks that due
reparation be sought from Germany
by our congress of the United States
for this act of barbarism."
GERMANS RETREAT
BEFORE BRITISH
French Towns Slowly Falling Into
Hands of Allies; Teutons Destroy
Systematically as They Leae
(William Phillip Simms, with the
British armies afield.)-March 1.__
Slowly and steadily the German retire-
ment continues south of Arras. Indi-
cations are lacking of any recoil move-
ment. The Germans apparently aim
to forestall an ultimate retreat after
what might prove a very slight ad-
vance of the old lines by taking up
new positions previously arranged
like those north of the Aisne. Gum-
mecourt has fallen into British hands,
and as this is being written, the won-
derfully fortified Bapaume is less than
a mile away. Church steeples and sim-
ilar vantage point-s have been system-
atically blown up as the Germans ev-
acuate the various villages in the ter-
ritory over which they have retreated.
ENROLL FOR FIRST AID WORK
AT HEALTH SERVICE TONIGHT
Courses in first aid to the injured
have not yet been definitely arranged.
Student enrollment will be continued
and all desiring to take the work can
enroll at 7:30 o'clock tonight at the
University health service.
Students that sign up are in no way
indebted to the American National Red
Cross society, but at the completion
of the course examinations for stu-
dents applying for a Red Cross certifi-
cate will be given.

Five speakers will deliver orations
tonight in University Hall in competi-
tion for the Nathan M. Kaufman
awards of $100 and $50, and the right
to represent Michigan in the annual
Northern Oratorical league contest to
be held this year in Minneapolis some
time in May.
The subjects of the speeches and the
contestants are:
I. S. Toplon, '17, "The Champion of
Justice"; Lois May, '18, "Woman and
War"; W. P. Sandford, '19, "Who Pays
the Price"; R. M Carson, '17., "The
Scholar and the Socialist"; Ferne
Layton, '18, "Patriots of Peace."
Prof. E. R. Bunker of the Law
school will preside and the judges are
Rev. John Mason Wells, pastor of the
Baptist church; Prof. J. R. Brumm of
of the rhetoric department; Prof. E.
C. Goddard of the Law school, Prof.
G. WI Dowrie of the economics depart-
ment, Mr. G. B. Grim of the rhetoric
department, Miss Sarah Weedon of
Ann Arbor high school, and Miss Edith
Thomas, head of the University li-
brary extension service.
In addition to the money awards
made to the winners of first and sec-
ond place, the winner of the contest
will receive the Chicago Alumni as-
sociation medal.
The contest will be entirely free to
the public and students, and no tick-
ets of admissiop4 or coupons will be
required.
PACK MADE EDITOR
OF 1917 WOLVERINE
R. M. Schiller, '18, to Be Business
Manager of Summer School
Paper
At its February meeting held yes-
terday afternoon, the board in control
of student publications selected Philip
C. Pack, '18, to act as managing editor
of the 1917 Wolverine, while Robert M.
Schiller, '18, will control the destinies
of the paper on the business side.
Arthur E. Hobbs, '19, winner of last
year's advertising contest, was award-
ed the managership of the athletic
program.
Thinks Germans Plan Final Drive
London, March 1.-"The British be-
lieve the German. retreat plan is a
strength saving maneuver preceding
a great German blow," declared H. W.
Foster, financial secretary to the war
office, in the house of commons this
afternoon. "As a result of the Ancre
pressure," Foster said, "the enemy re-
tired on a 12 mile front, and the Brit-
ish have advanced to a depth of two
miles, gaining ten villages and other
important positions. The retreat is
bound to affect unfavorably the Ger-
man troops and the German people."
Dudley Speaks to Senior Engineers
Mr. A. M. Dudley, section engineer
for the Westinghouse Electrical Manu-
facturing company of Pittsburg, Pa.,
spoke to the senior engineers-at their
assembly yesterday morning on the
topic: "Some Fundamental Advice to
Graduating Engineers."
Nominations were made at the class
meeting immediately preceding the
talk for the offices of alumni secretary,
class orator and class historian for
the Commencement exercises. The
election will be held Monday.
Elect Men for Soph Prom Committee
Yesterday morning at the sophomore
engineer assembly the class elected
the following men for the soph prom
committee: E. M. Miller, chairman; B.
Thompson, A. H. Luser C. T. Van
Dusen, H. J. Mack, R. S. Bridge, John
Stewart, H. H. Horwitz, C. R. Nyman,
and D. M. Springer.

Cleveland, O., Mar. 1.-The
Michigan club of Cleveland,
numbering 375, votes 80 per
cent in favor of a return to the
conference.
G. M. WELLS, '15, Sec.
Expect Good Bill
Forand.Bounce
Tickets for Next Friday's Performance
Now on Sale at State
Street Stores
All the old snap and pep that has
characterized the Band Bounces of the
past will not be absent from the next
on the list, that set for the evening of
Friday, March 9, according to a state-
ment made by those in charge of the
affair.
Seven numbers by the band are
promised, while six acts will be put
on by many campus prsonages, known
for their ability in former dramatic
entertainments. The entire program is
said to contain many novel ideas
which will be introduced to insure an
evening of lively amusement.
Tickets are being distributed among
students in the various departments,
and may be had for sale at many of
the State street stores as well as at
the box office of Hill auditorium on
the evening of the entertainment. The
one admission price of 25 cents will
admit to all parts of the house.
PLAY FIVE AM SIN
CLA9SSLEAGUE SERIES,

TRACKSTERS LEAI
AMID THE CHEEF
OF 500 SUE
MICHIGAN CINDER SQUAD
FOR CONFERENCE RELAY
GAMES

LE SCOFIELD,
DASH MAN,

STA
TO

SOPH AND JUNIOR LITS
EVENING'S STAR
BATTLE

TIE IN1

Forming a very appropriate and at-
tractive counter attraction to the
championship match of the evening,
class bask;tball made its initial ap-
pearance of the season last night in
Waterman gymnasium. At 9:30 o'clock
three matches had .be'en called off or
postponed and five contests had been
played, one of which resulted in a tie.
Taking the floor in the early part
of the festivities, the graduate basket
men were awarded the decision over
the foresters by a 10 to 2 count. About
the same time the senior laws cham-
pioned by Lokker floored the first
year men of the same school with a
score of 16 to 6. In the later dual be-
tween the fresh lits and senior lits the
younger generation carried off the
honors with the evidence reading 21
to 6.
Engineers also appeared on , the
scene and the result was another case
of upperclass humiliation at the hands
of a lower organization. The specific
facts show the sophomores with a 11-
point lead over the juniors, the score
being 15 to 4. The literary classes of
'18 and '19 also found cause for an
argument, resulting in the fastest
game of the evening. After two
periods of hostility the teams each
produced a total of 13 unlucky points
and cried for more time. The hour
having become late the petition was
refused. and the game recorded as a
tie..
The fresh medics and soph medics
were for some reason unable to play
and their- game was called off. Two
other matches, architects vs. pharmics,
and junior-senior medics vs. homoeops
were postponed.
"1" to Conduct Lenten Courses
During Lenten season, commencing
the week of March 4 and lasting for
five weeks, the University "Y" will
conduct a series of classes in religous
education. These courses will be
given in Lane hall, the new building
of the University "Y" and will be free
to any student in the University.
Prof. Adams Talks on Trade Relations
Prof. H. C. Adams addressed the
class in international relations last
night in University Hall. The effect
of trade on international relations was
the subject of the discussion, and the
speaker dealt particularly with trade
relations between nations of different
industrial efficiency.

Sophomore Demonstrates Right
Make Trip in Practice Sprint
at Gymnasium
To the strains of "The'Victors"
the cheers of 500 students, Michig
track team, confident of making a
showing, left at 10:42 o'clock
night for Urbana to compete in
Illinois relay races.
Bob Bennett, '18, aroused the pe
the crowd in the Michigan Ce!
depot, following the snake dance d
State street from University hall;
Wallie Niemann, '17, acted as 4f
spokesman, declaring that the
thusiasm displayed would put
into the members of the team.
"Railroad Jack," who said his
casional connections with Mich
students for 21 years made him
petent to judge, announced from
top of a box car that such a dis
of spirit, even by such a few, c
mean nothing short of victory.
Le Scofield demonstrated yeste
afternoon his- right to be taken a
by running a capable quarter ,
Le ran the entire race without j
an without f'eeling any bad effec1
his injured muscles.
The two-day rest which the star
junior will have before facing a
competition should do much to
mote the recovery of most of his 0P
Steve is looking forward to the
est meet which his men have f
this season. Instead of but one Wo
to beat, as has been the case in -
the meets this season, the Wolver
will find themselves up against
best in the Big Nine, with stars I
nearly a dozen other schools con
ing as well.
21 NEW RECRUITS ENLIST IN
MILITARY TRAINING COMP
When 21 new advocates of mil
training appeared for drill at W
man gymnasium on Wednesday,
required number of 100 men
reached. The older men received
ther training in company drill,
Captain Lowry promises that as E
as the weather permits, the drills
take place at Ferry field with the
of artificial light.
By next Wednesday night the ri
for the newly received rifles will I
been constructed and the men will
ceive their first drill with them,
Girls' Glee Club in Charge of S
The show at the Arcade theatei
day, "The White Raven," in w
Ethel Barrymore appears, -is undei
auspices of the University Girls'
club. The club makes a full p
from all tickets sold prior to the
formances.
Dr. Wolman Talks to Junior Engim
Dr. Leo Wolman addressed
junior engineers at their assembly
terday morning. His topic conce
the engineer and his social ideal.
class elected A. J. Goldberg in
baseball manager.
Fresh Lils Are Slow to Pay ]
At the present time only 231 I
lits have paid their class dues, i
ing a total of less than one-fift
the members of the class. Dues
be paid today between 2 and 3 o'c
in the Library corridor.
Feinstein Talks on Jewish His
Martin Feinstein of the rhetori
partment gave a short talk on A
Jewish history at the regular we
meeting of the Menorah fociety
night in the natural science buili

"Ancient, Athletics" SuJect of
"Ancient Athletics" was the sul
of an illustrated lecture given be
the Classical club in Memorial
last evening by Professor A. R. I
tenden of the Latin denartment.

Ir

"Ike" Fisher's Quintette

Good Floor

UNIVERSITY DANCE
BY
Combined Councils
AT
BARBOUR GYMNASIUM
:ao to 11:30 P. M.

50 cents

SATURDAY, MARCH 4th I

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