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March 01, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-01

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY; UNSETTLED
TODAY

L~Li ian

oIai1tj

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

I

rwi www. u r i YYI d

VOL. XXVII. No. 103. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1917. PRICE FIVE CE

7

FACULTY MEMBERS
_.REQUESTARMS FOR
.MERCHANT MARINE
Send Message to President Wilson
Asking Defense Against
Submarines
ANN ARBOR CITIZENS
ALSO SIGN PETITIONS
Major G. . Putnam Heads American
Rights League in This
Movement
Faculty members of the University
and prominent citizens of Ann Arbor
sent the undersigned message to Pres-
ident Wilson last night, requesting
that our merchant marine be armed
for defense against the submarine
menace.
Hundreds of similar messages are
sent to the President under the di-
rection of the American rights league
of New York city at the head of which
is Major G. Haven Putnam of Putnam
and Sons, publishers.
We, .the undersigned American citi-
Zens, without distinction of race or
party, realizing that our ports are
blockaded and that our defenseless
ships can no longer sail with safety,
call upon the governmt to arm our
merchant ships now and employ the
strength of our navy to protect them
in their legal rights:
(Signed) Prof. William H. Hobbs,
Prof. A. G. Hall, Prof. H. M. Randall,
Prof. Louis A. Strauss, Prof. Walter
F. Hunt, Prof. E. C. Case, Prof. L. Wa-
terman, R. A. Dodge, Prof. S. J.
Zowski, Prof. H. B. Merrick, S. A.
Moran, R. D. McNamee, Dr. C. V. Wel-
ler, J S. Chambers, George M. Ehlers,
Dr. Sven Froeberg, A. R. Vorys, Prof.
E. C. Goddard, Dr. Paul H. DeKruif,
G. H. Harrison, Prof. R. D. Hollister,
Prof. William A. Frayer, Dr. Alfred
H. W. Povah, Prof. 0. F. Sponsler,
William H. Buettner, Prof. H. W. King,
Prof. H. C. Saddler, Prof. Clarence
Johnston, Prof. C. O. Carey, C. J.
Pratt, Prof. A. S. Warthin, Dr. H. H.
Cummings, Prof. E. D. Campbell, Dr.
C O. Sauer, Prof. Charles W. Cook,
Prof. H. A. Sanders, G. W. Fletcher,
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd, Dr. E. L. Trox-
ell.
Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, Prof. Earl W.
Dow, Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, Prof. C.
O. Davis, Dr. Louis P. Hall, Prof.
Arthur L. Cross, Dr. C. B. Vibbert, Dr.
Marcus L. Ward, Dr. Chalmers J.
Lyons, Prof. Henry C. Adams, Prof.
Louis H. Boynton, Dr. Warren P.
Lombard, Prof. S. Lawrence Bigelow,
Dr. James F. Breakey, Prof. J. W.
Bradshaw, Prof. F. W. Kelsey, Prof.
Hugo P. Thieme, Prof. Arthur G. Can-
field, L. J. Allen, C. H. Shearer, Albert
B. Johnson, F. P. Jordan.
INLANDER SALE NOT
UP TO RECORD MARK

Seven judges for
Contest Seleted
No Admission to be Charged for
Oratorical Meet Tomorrow
Night
Seven judges have been chosen for
the Northern league oratorical con-
test to be held in University hall to-
morrow night.
The judges are: Rev. John Mason
Wells, pastor of the First Baptist
church, Prof. J. R. Brumm of the rhe-
toric department, Prof. E. C. Goddard
of the Law school, Prof. G. W. Dowrie
of the economics department, G. B.
Grim of the rhetoric faculty, Miss Sar-
ah Wheedon of Ani Arbor high school,
and Miss Edith Thomas head of the
University library extension service.
The contest will be open to everyone,
no admission will be charged.
first Aid Course
Proves Popular
H. I. Cummings of University Health
Service Directs New
Class
The first meeting of the course in
first aid held at the health service of-
fices last night brought out a consid-
erable number of students, and further
plans for the accommodations of great-
er numbers have been made. The
course is directed by Dr. H. H. Cum-
mings of the University health serv-
ice.
Another opportunity to enroll will
be given from 7 to 8 o'clock tomorrow
evening at the health service offices on
South Thayer street. In order to al-
low everyone an opportunity to take
the course a chice between three,
nights of the week can be arranged.
The classes will' be held from 7 to 8
o'clock on Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday evenings. Seven sections of
15 students each will be scheduled.
At least 100 students can be accom-
modated and additional arrangements
will be made if more than that num-
ber enroll for the course.
Certificate Entitles to Medical Corps
On completion of the course an ex-
amination can be taken under the
auspices of the Red Cross and certifi-
cates signed by President Wilson will
be awarded those who pass it. The
certificate will entitle the holder to a
place in the nedical corps in case of
hostilities
The course given by Dr. C. B. Stouf-
fer for engineers is being attended
largely and this opportunity is now
being offered the rest of the campus.
It is planned to make the course a
regularly elective one next year in
the literary department. The installa-
tion of the course came too late to be
published in the regular announce-
ment.
AMERICANS HELD IN FRANCE
AS GERMANS GIVEN FREEDOM
Paris, Feb. 28.- Hartwig Devisen,
formerly of Laporte, Ind., and Mrs.
Devissen, who came out of Germany
with former Ambassador Gerard and
his party and were held up at Pont-
parlier because of their German con-
nections, were released Monday on
representations made by the Americar
embassy, and proceeded to Spain
They will embark for the United
States at Corunna.
The embassy in Paris received evi-
dence which established the claim of
Mr. and Mrs. Devisen for protection
as American citizens.

The evidence included a letter from
Mr. Thackara, the American consul
general here, who knew the couple
when he was the consular representa-
tive in Berlin.
STANDARD OIL COMPANY TO
SUE BERLIN FOR DAMAGES
New York, Feb. 28.-The Standard
Oil company willseek indemnity for
the destruction of its oil properties
in Roumania at the time of the Ger-
man invasion of that country.
The following statement was ob-
tained at the company's offices:
"On inquiry at the offices of the
Standard Oil company of New Jersey
today the statement was made that1
the company's Roumanian properties
having been destroyed, indemnity
would be sought but that no determin-
ation had yet been : eached as to ways
and means.'

HOUSE COMMITTE GRANTS
WILSON'S POWER REQUEST
TWO IMPORTANT RESTRICTIONS
MADE DURING BILL'S
PASSAGE
Washington, Feb. 28.-The Mich-
igan delegation in congress headed
by Senator William Allen Smith,
republican, in caucus today, un-
auniously voted to uphold Pres-
ident Wilson, and the resolution
giving the president all the pow-
er he asked in his address Mon-
day
By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staf' Correspondent)
Washington, Feb. 28. -The house
foreign affairs committee today upheld
President Wilson's request for power
to meet the international situation, but
with two important restrictions. Au-
thority for the use of other instrumen-
talities aside from guns, guners, and
money was struck from the original
Flood bill, thus limiting the president's
authority to some extent.
The second restriction was the in-
sertion of a provision against the use
of the war risk bureau to insure
ships carrying munitions. As the house
bill now stands it provides for grant-
ing President Wilson guns, gunners,
and one hundred million dollars. The
guns and gunners are to be used to
protect ships and citizens of the United
States against unlawful attack in their
lawful and peaceful pursuits on the
high seas.
TAXES TO SO UNLESS
BUDGETGRIATY CUT
$10,000,000 ASKED FOR BY STATE
INSTITUTIONS THIS
YEAR
Lansing, Mich., Feb. 28.-The 25
state institutions are asking the leg-
islature for approximately $10,000,000.
Unless the ways and means commit-
tee of the house and the finance and
appropriations committee of the sen-
ate do some paring, the state tax for
the next two years will exceed that of
the last two years, when it reached
the staggering total of $16,700,000.
Many of the institutional requests
are swollen by sums asked for special
purposes. On the other hand, the
sums awarded to the Michigan Agri-
cultural college and the University of
Michigan under the mill tax laws, are
not included in the amount. The form-
er will receive about $500,000 under
this law, the exact amount not being
known until the valuation of the state
is completed. The Ann Arbor insti-
tution will receive approximately $1,-
100,000 under this provision.
Further Sums Asked
In addition to the sums asked by
the various institutions, the legisla-
ture must provide for the moneys ap-
propriated by past legislatures under
statutes that still are in force. Two
years ago the legislature was com-
pelled to appropriate $2,710,000 to meet
such sums.
The 1915 legislature appropriated
$1,500,000 for the state highway de-
partment, $600,000 being to make up
a deficit caused by the collapse of the
1913 horse power act. The present
body will not be forced to appropriate
for the department, except for a few
special purposes as automobile
licenses are bringing in enough money
to operate it. Despite the elimination
of this large item, the present legisla-

ture doubtless will appropriate more
than the 1915 body.
New Divorce Bill
Representative George McArthur of
Eaton Rapids has revived the bill
which was presented by the late Rufus
Skeels of Oceania during the session
of 1913 providing that absolute divorce
may be granted to either husband or
wife when the opposite party to such
marriage relation has become incur-
ably insane. Under the present law
insanity does not constitute grounds
for divorce.
McArthur's bill, however, provides
that no divorce shall be granted on
the ground of insanity until after the
insane person has been committed to
the care of a state hospital for a
period of five years and until com-
petent authorities have satisfied the
court that the defendant is incurably
and hopelessly insane. The law also
(Continued on Page Six.)

UNIQUE CONCERT IEN
BY BAVERAND CARSL
PIANIST AND 'CELLIST IN CON-
CERT BEFORE LARGE
AUDIENCE
Harold Bauer, pianist, and Pablo
Casals, 'cellist, appeared in joint re-
cital before an appreciative audience
last evening in Hill auditorium and
demonstrated conclusively that it is
possible for two musicians, who are
artists in their own particular field, to
combine and present a program which
is unique in every respect.
These talented men opened te pro-
gram with Beethoven's Sonata in A
major and their interpretation was re-
ceived with enthusiasm, the Scherzo
movement being especially pleasing.
The ensemble playing in this number,
as well as in the last number on the
program, could scarcely have been
improved upon.
Pianist Interprets Tone Pictures
This sonata was followed by Schu-
mann's "Scenes from Childhood,"
played by Mr. Bauer. The player
brought to the interpretation of this
series of tone pictures that powerful
command of contrast necessary in a
number of this character. Mr. Bauer
plays with a broad intellectual ap-
preciation. His tone is firm aind even,
and his touch approaches the pro-
verbial "velvet touch" that has such a
particular allure.
Mr. Bauer also played Chopin's
Ballade in A fiat, which was done with
the same singing tone and delicacy of
execution as the preceding number.
Much pleasure was derived from this
number and also from the encore
which followed it.
'Cellist True Master
Mr. Casals played Bach's Suite in G
major, which not only showed the pos-
sibilities of the 'cello as a solo in-
strument, but also that Mr. Casals is
a complete master of the difficult in-
strument. This number, which was
unaccompanied, undoubtedly showed
Mr. Casals' devotion to his art, but
was not especially pleasing to . the
average listener, who still clings to
the idea that music is meant primarily
to be pleasing to the ear, and who
feels that the 'cello, as a solo instru-
ment, is more effective when accom-
panied by another instrument. Mr.
Casals produces a tone of marvelous
richness and volume, and has a tech-
nique equal to all demands. He has
temperamental reserve but can infuse
into his readings plenty of "fire" and
his numbers were interpreted with a
high regard for their musical values.
Grieg's beautiful Sonata in A minor
closed the program and was received
with much favor.
Y.M.C.A. CAMPAIGN
'NOW UP TO $22,961
major Portion of the $30,000 Total Al-
ready Secured for Re-equipping
Local Building
The Y. M. C. A. had secured $22,-
961.50 yesterday noon, the third day
of a five-day campaign to raise $30,-
000, for the re-equipping of the city
association building.
Mr. Charles L. Brooks, captain of
team No. 3, secured $3,026; Dr. D. W.
Myers, captain of team No. 6, secured
$1,422; and Mr. H. J. Abbott, captain
of team No. 9, secured $1,958.
Mr. L. J. Hoover, of the Hoover
Steel Ball company, has subscribed

$10,000, the largest donation received
thus far provided the rest of the $30,-
000 is secured.
$V%,000,000 PURCHASES TO
- INSTRUCT IN PREPAREDNESS
New York, Feb. 28.-Brig.-Gen. A.
J. Smith, chief of the supplies division
of the United States quartermaster's
department, is in New York, instruct-
ing officers in new methods of pur-
chasing supplies. The plan for assemb-
ling in a few months $15,000,000 worth
of clothing and tents is designed, Gen-
eral Smith said, to furnish a practical
lesson in preparedness to merchants
and manufacture'rs.
Distribution of orders is to be made
from depots at New Fork, Philadel-
phia, Boston, Chicago, and St. Louis in
comparatively small lots. Previously,
bids for army supplies have been re-
ceived only in Washington.

"eport Universal
Training Measure
Senate Military Committee Increases
House Appropriation by
$38,000,000
Washington, Feb. 28.-The senate
military committee today agreed to
report the army bill carrying an
amendment providing for universal
training. The bill, later reported .to
the senate, carries a total of $277,000,-
000, the senate having increased the
amount $38,000,000 over the house ap-
propriation.
An increased allowance for auto-
matic machine rifles of $4,350,300 is
provided. The appropriation for the
signal service, of which aviation is a
branch, is also boosted from $2,800,-
000 to $11,800,000.
The universal military training
amendment is similar to. the original
Chamberlain bill, the army general
staff measure being laid aside.
Rifle Club Out
After Hem bers
Lack of Interest Manifested to Date
Causes Shooters to Go After
New Material
Beginning next Monday the rifle
club will start an extensive member-
ship campaign. Faculty and students
will be solicited in an effort to swell
the cohorts of the sharpshooters.
Only 75 men have enrolled with the
'organization so far this season, while
last year the club had a roster con-
taining 175 names and was recognized
as the largest school or university
rifle club in the United States. The
authorities do not know where to place
the responsibility for this lack of in-
terest. Prevailing conditions are con-
ducive to good results.
Last year the Wolverines maintained
a poor range in the Ferry field in-
termural clubhouse and sometimes
held practice in zero weather. Yet
this did not prevent them from cop-
ping the intercollegiate championship
for class "B." This year the Michi-
ganders have built a' regulation range
in the unfinished pool of the Water-
man gymnasium, which is within easy
reach of everyone. The number who
have answered this year's call are a
mere handful compared with the
showing in 1916.
Membership in this organization is
open to anyone. The dues for the
first year are $1.50 and 50 cents for
the renewal of membership every suc-
ceeding year. In return for this fee
the members receive the use of rifles
and range. Ammunition is sold to
them at cost price which is less than
they would pay at any supply store.
Arrangements have been made
whereby the range will be open from
2 to 5:30 o'clock on Monday, Wednes-
day, and Friday of each week. Men
who have made their mark as sharp-
shooters and who know something
about handling rifle will be in charge
and ready to lend whatever aid they
can. Lower classmen are especially
urged to answer this call.
REKILL SCHIEWITZ BILL
PROVIDING"DRY" ZONE
Madison, Wis., Feb. 28.-After two
hours of debate the assembly rekilled
the Schiewitz bill for a half mile of
"dry" zone around the soldiers' home
at Milwaukee. When the bill was
killed last week a motion for recon-

sideration was immediately entered so
that the bill could be finally done away
with for the session. When the re-
consideration motion was taken up,
the assembly unexpectedly voted to
give further consideration to the meas-
ure, but finally killed it by a vote of
45 to 42.
Assemblyman J. C. Hanson of Dane.
county read a report of J. E. Crain,
governor of the home, declaring that
fut of approximately 500 deaths which
have occurred at the home during the
last two years, "at least 30 per cent
were due either directly, or indirectly
to the use of liquor."
Brown Faculty Commend Pres. Wilson
Providence, R. I., Feb. 28.-The fac-
ulty of Brown university have sent
a telegram to President Wilson com-
mending him for his action, against
Germany, and asking him to be swift
and bold in his further dealings.

STUDENTS MEETT
GIVE TRACK TEAM
SEND-OFF T~G
WALLIE NIEMANN, '17, TO OI1
BEST WISHES TO TEAM
FOR STUDENTS
ROOTERS' SPECIAL TO
LEAVE FRIDAY NIGH
Rooters to March to Station to Sen
Varsity Track Squad
Oft

x:
x:
Y
X
*k

* * * * * * * *

*

Time--8:30 o'clock tonight
Place-Front of U-hall.
What-To march to M. C. station
Why-To give Varsity track
team send-off to Illinois meet.

* For the first time since 1906,
Michigan track team will compete I
a western conference meet Saturda
upon the invitation of the Universil
of Illinois, leaving tonight for JJrbar
at :x:15 o'clock.
- A rousing send-off has bee plai
ned for the team. Students wi
meet at 8:30 oclock tonight i
front of University hall to march
the Michigan Central station whe
the trackteam will be waiting in
special car.
Wallie Niemann, '17, will represe
the students in extending best wish
for the team's success.
The festivities at thehstation will I
short. The train to which the speci
car will be attached is not schedule
to leave until 10:42 o'clock, but Coa
Farrell says that the tracksters mu
be in their berths at 9:15 o'clock. Ti
rooters will bid the team a fond ad
at that time.
A special car has been arranged1
carry 40 men to represent Michig
at the Champaign meet. Party rat
have been obtained for the trip whi
provides for a stop-off in Chica
Sunday on the return to Ann Arbor.
All students interested in the speci
car, which will leave Friday night i
stead of Thursday as formerly a
nounced, should see George J. Moe, 7:
North University avenue, before
o'clock tonight. Reservations must I
made today.
JUNIOR LITS ELECT
KIRKPATRICK HEA
Hogan Chosen as Student Coun
Representative at Election
Yesterday
A. L. Kirkpatrick was elected pres
dent and W. 1. Hogan as Stude:
council representative at the junior
election yesterday afternoon. i
Kirkpatrick was elected to fill the va
cancy created by the resignation
Owen Watts.
UTA11 TO VOTE ON DRY LAW
IN 1918; BILL IS SIGNE
Salt Lake City, Utah, Mar. 1.-Go
Simon Bamberger signed today t
joint resolution passed by the legisl
ture to submit to the Utah electora
in 1918 the question of state-wide pr
hibition by constitutional amendemei
Statutory prohibiion, effective-Aug.
1917, already has been provided fI
by the present legislature.
$360 FOR ANOTHER'S COPY
OF "HOME, SWEET HOM
New York, Mar. 1.-"Home, Swe
Home," in the handwriting of Jo
Howard Payne, its author, and signi
by him, has brought $360 at auct
here. The manuscript, which consis
of the first and second stanzas of t
poe(m with the chorus, was dated
Washington, Aug. 10, 1850. It is pr
sumed he wrote it for some friend.
NATIONAL ANTHEM IN MEDLEY
TO BE BARRED IN COLORAJ
Denver, Colo., Feb. 28.-Singing
playing "The Star Spangled Banne:
in Colorado in a medley is made a mi
demeanor in a bill passed by the hou
of representatives. It already ha
passed the senate and awaits the go
ernor's signature. Both the musici
and theater of cafe owner is liable
a fine of from $25 to $100.

Literary Magazine Larger Than
Previous Issues; Interest
In Conference

All

Copies of the Inlander for February
met with a ready sale upon the cam-
pus yesterday. While it did not equal
the five-hour record set by the Jan-
uary number, the circulation manager
of the magazine declared it to be sat-
isfactory in all respects.
Owing to the length of the articles
and story selected for publication, it
was found necessary to print eight ad-
ditional pages, making the Inlander
for the current month larger than any
previous issue.
Some attention has been attracted
to the discussion of the conference
question, it is reported, while the other
contributed articles and literary ma-
terial are worthy of note. There are
still a number of copies to be secured
at the ceveral State street book stores.
SUFFRAGE MAKES LARGE GAIN
IN ARKANSAS TEST CASE
Little Rock, Ark., Feb. 28.- The
senate today passed, 17 to 15, the bill
which permits women to vote in all
preliminary elections in Arkansas.
The bill had passed the house, but the
senate added some minor amendments
so that the measure now must be re-
turned to the house.

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