100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 28, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

VY L.t £ £ AJ1Z
AND COLDER
TroDAY

I

00 tV~ x

i3atti

UNITED F

DAY AND NIGHI
IRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 102. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1917. PRICE FIVE C

__ : t

EXPECT 100 MEN
FOR DRiLL TONIGHT
Interest Among Students in Military
Training IsProgressing
Rapidly
RECEIVE LOAN OF 50 RIFLES
BY COURTESY OF MAJOR WILSON
Definite Program Will Be Published
Shortly; Work of Wide Scope
Undertaken
By L. S. T.
Interest among Michigan students in
military training is rapidly increasing.
A full war strength company reported
for duty at the last drill on Wednes-
day and many more are expected to-
night.
The officers in charge of the work
believe the number will reach 100 at
the drill tonight. The "rookies"
who appeared last Wednesday were
going through simple company move-
ments in a short time. The reason for
their rapid progress, according to the
officers, is that the men are much morn
easily taught than the ordinary en-
listed soldier.
Arrange Program
A definite program for the rest of
the senmester will be published shortly.
Captain Lowrie says that work of a
very wide scope will be undertaken.
For the next few drills, close and ex-
tended order movements in the manual
of arms will be emphasized. There
will also be weekly talks by commis-
sioned officers.
The movement received a big boost
in the form of a loan of 50 rifles ar-
ranged for by Captain Lowrie. The
guns have been loaned through the
cpurtesy of Major Wilson. While it
would be much more advantageous to
have arms for every student it will
be possible to alternate in using them
so that all will get the practice of
handling a rifle in drills.
Speaks About Sitution
At the last meeting of the drillers
the captain spoke to the men while
they were resting, about the military
situation, the plans of the drilling
students and also about the work done
in the summer at Plattsburg. Lieu-
tenant Schermer spoke on the subject
of military etiquette and its usage.
New men who appear for the first
time tonight should go to the west end
of the gymnasium which the military
men are using. The east end of the
gymnasium is being used by the naval
reserves.
There is still plenty of room for
new men. The officers anticipate that
the attendance will shortly necessi-
tate dividing the men into two groups
and arranging drills for some other
night each week in addition to Wed-
nesday.

STUDENT TO GO
T O ILLINOIS MEET
Michigan Alumni to Honor Varsity
and Rooters at Banquet
Friday Night
With the possibility of attending a
Michigan alumni banquet to be held
Friday night in Champaign, Ill., on
the eve of the Illinois track carnival,
efforts are being made to charter a
special car for students from Ann Ar-
bor to Champaign.
Providing 40 men sign up for the
trip, a car will leave this city Thurs-
day night over the Michigan Central
and will return Sunday. Special rates
have been obtained by the committee
and sleeping accommodations can be
had in the car Friday and Saturday
nights, besides Thursday.
Reports coming from Urbana show
that Illinois students are looking for-
ward to the meet with great en-
thusiasm afid can see in the contest'
the prospects of future competition
with Michigan. Michigan alumni in
Chicago are pleased with the entry
of the Wolverines and a large num-
ber of them will journey with the team
from the Windy City.
Leave with Team
The Varsity track team will leave
with the car Thursday and will attend
the banquet to be given by the Michi-
gan club of Champaign Friday night.
The Illinois organization invites Mich-
igan undergraduates to accompany the
team and also to be guests at the af-
fair Fridays.
Already 12 students have signed up
in order to witness Michigan's first
competition with western conference
teams since 1905. All men intending
to go are requested to register at the
Union some time before tomorrow
noon.
In addition to attending the banquet
and meet, Michigan students will have
an opportunity to inspect the twin
cities of Champaign-Urbana and the
University of Illinois. Many under-
graduates and alumni of the Big NineI
schools will also be present. The
meet will be held Saturday night in
the gigantic new university armory.
Large Delegation Going
Raffles are being held by many fra-
ternity houses and stores in the- city
with the fare for the trip as the prize.
The winners of these competitions
along with other men who will go,
should give Michigan a representation
of from 50 to 75 rooters besides the
alumni at the big meet.
PRESIDENT TO SPEAK
AT FORMAL OPENING

HOLLWEG TALKS ON
GERMAN SITUATION
Abrupt Recall of Gerard to United
States Criticised By Chan-
cellor
DECLARES ACT OF WILSON IN
RECENT BREAK ITNPRECEDENTEID
Says President's Course in Mexico is
Violation of International
Usage
Berlin, Feb. 27. - Chancellor von
Bethmann-Hollweg told the German
Reichstag today that President Wil-
son's action in breaking off relations*
with Germany was unprecedented. He
characterized the method by which
America terminated friendly inter-
course as brusk. He drew a parallel
between President Wilson's course in
Mexico imbroglio of 1913 and the Ger-
man situation after the start of the
war.
Hollweg called attention to Presi-
dent Wilson's notification to congress
in 1913 that he would follow interna-
tional usage and put an embargo on
shipment of arms to both factions in
Mexico. "But a year later," the chan-
cellor said, "these usages were no
more consid-ered good." Hollweg dil-
ated on the countless war materials
shipped from America to Germany's
enemies.
The chancellor referred to America's
insistence upon the right of American
citizens to travel to France and Eng-
land, but, he declared, "the mere rights
of American citizens towards the Cen-
tral powers did not seem to be as
worthy of protection and as valuable."
Hollweg found fault with the abrupt-
ness of Gerard's recall and complained
he did not yet know officially why
America had broken off relations.
Germany's peace conditions are
based upon reparation for all wrongs
suffered, and guarantees the existence
and future of a strong Germany, the
chancellor said. "There is only one
necessity of the day," he declared. "It
dominates all questions of policy, both
foreign and domestic. It is to fight
and gaim a victory."
FIRST AID MEN TO
MEET DR. CUMMINGS
Physician Names Hours to Consult
Students and Ctlizens Inter-
ested in Work

I

IMichigan Tracks ters to Receive
Big Sena Off Tomorrow Night
When the Wolverine squad of cinder-path burners leaves tomor-
row night for its initial invasion of the western conference citadels,
there will be a host of Maize and Blue rooters at the depot to wish
the boys bon voyage on their new venture.
A giant send-off has been arranged for the team, withr the Var-
sity band and as much of the Michigan student body as can be
- crammed onto, the platform of the Michigan Central depot, the De-
troit street viaduct, State street hill, and any other convenient
places 6f vantage, acting as principles.
The multitude will meet in front of University hall at 8:30 o'clock
tomorrow night, whence it will march to the depot behind. the band.
Here, Cheer-leader Bob Bennett, will attempt to deposit the roof of
the 'station somewhere in the middle of the next county by the volume
of noise he will elicit from the crowd.
Wallie Niemann, Varsity center and the scrappiest man in Mich-
igan, will tell the team what the University expects of them, and it
may be that some of the tracksters themselves will be prevailed upon
to deliver a bit of oratory. The team will be sent on their way to
the strains of The Victors.

INTRODUCE- BIUI
GRANTING WILSO
'BLANKET POWEI

CHOOSE REPRESENTATIVE
FROM, FRIDAY SPEAKERS
FINAL ELIMINATIONS FOR NORTH-
ERN ORATORICAL CONTEST
TO BE HELD IN U-HALL
Michigan will choose her representa-
tive to .compete in the northern ora-
torical final 'contest when five speak-
ers will deliver orations Friday in Uni-
versity Hall. Eliminations for the
various classes were held last week,
and two contestants iwere chosen from
the junior class, two from the senior
and one from the sophomore. Lots
were draws for the order of speaking
and the orations will be given as fol-
lows:
I. S. Toplon, '17, "The Champion of
Justice."+
Lois May, '18, "Woman and War."
W. P. Sandford, '19, "Who Pays the;
Price ?"'
R. M. Carson, '17, "The Scholar and
the Socialist."+
Ferne Layton, '18, "Patriots of
Peace."
Prof. R. E. Bunker of the Law
school will preside and the judges for
the contest will be announced later.
This is the twenty-seventh time that+
Michigan has chosen her representa-
tive for the Northern Oratorical league
contest, held annually with the Uni-
versities of Michigan, Wisconsin, Min-
nesota, Iowa, Illinois, Northwestern,
and Oberlin competing.
In the local contest to be held here
Friday night, two testimonials of $100
and $50 will be given the winners of
first and second places. These prizes
are given annually by Nathan M. Kauf-
man of Marquette, Mich.
In addition, the winner of first place
will be given the medal-awarded by
the Chicago Alumni association.
The contest will be entirely free to
the students and the public, and a
ticket of admission will not be re-
quired, the plan of requiring the pre-
sentation of a coupon having proved
unsatisfactory last year.
Mortarboard to Give Mock Trial
A mock trial, Peck vs. Peck, will be
given by the Mortarboard society at
the Women's league party on Friday,
March 2, in Barbour gymnasium. Olga
Shinkman, '17, will be the judge and
Anita Kelly, '17, and Ethel Vail, '17,
will be the lawyers.
After the trial there will be dauAing
and bridge until 6 o'clock.
Women Hold Meeting for War Work
The regular meeting of women stu-
dents interested in war relief work
was held yesterday afternoon in Bar-

OPER OCHESTRA TO BE
CHOSEN THIS AFTERNOON
TWENTY MEN WILL BE PICKED;
EXPECT LARGE NUMBER
TO RESPOND
Tryouts for the orchestra of "Fools'
Paradise" to be presented in Ann Ar-
bor on March 21, 22, 23, 24 will be
held at 4 o'clock this afternoon at the
School of Music. Twenty men will be
chosen from those trying out. In view
of the fact that the entire orchestra
will be taken on the spring vacation
trip as well as being given an equal
chance to procure tickets for the Ann
Arbor productions with the cast and
committee men, it is expected that a
large number will respond to this call.
Arthur A. Schupp, '17E, general
chairman of "Fools' Paradise," is well
satisfied with the way rehearsals are
going during Director Morgan's ab-
sence.
The Union and the committee in
charge of the opera join in thanking
the Y. M. C. A. for their hospitality in
permitting the rehearsals to be held
in Lane hall. The chorus will hold
its next meeting at 4 o'clock this aft-
ernoon and the cast will meet at 7
o'clock tonight. All rehearsals will
be held in Lane hall in the future.
ARGENTINA SEEKS
PEACE INTERESTS

RECOMhIEPD ARMED MERCHANT
SHIPS AGAINST U-BOAT
ATTACKS
$100,000,000 CREDIT FOR
THE PRESIDENT'S USAGE
Defeat Threatens Measure Through
One-Man Filibuster by Sen.
ator LaFollette
Bulletin
Washingtlon, Feb. 27.-Senator
Stone, chairman of the senate for.
eign relations committee, late this
afternoon introduced the commit-
tee's bill granting President Wil-
son practically all of the powers
he had asked in order to deal with
the German situation.
Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Feb. 27.-The senate
foreign relations committee, following
President Wilson's request to con-
gress for plenary. powers in dealing
with the German situation this after-
noon agreed to recommend that Amer-
ican merchant vessels under Americar
registry be authorized to arm and de-
fend themselves against submarine at-
tacks, and that President Wilson be
empowered to supply defensive arma-
-ment fore and aft.
President Wilson is also authorized
and empowered "to employ such other
instrumentalities and methods as may
seem necessary and adequate to pro-
tect American vessels and citizens in
their lawful pun suits on the high seas.'
A credit of one hundred million dol-
lars was recommended for the presi-
dent to be expended at his discretion
in carrying out his authority.

Washington, Feb. 27.-The ho
foreign affairs committee late this
ernoon planned to report on the F:
bill, eliminating other instrumer
ities aside from guns, gunners,
muoney, wehich President Wilson se
as a mneans to handle the foreign s
ation. There was some suggestio:
the committee that the Laconia s
ing may alter the whole situation,
that members would not be surpri
if President Wilson should ask r
full and direct authority than he
as yet.

INLANDER

IS ISSUEDI

February Number of Literary Maza-
zine Appears at Noon
"The Border Patrol," an expose of
the militia organization, written by a.
national guardsman, will appear in the
February Inlander which will appear
today. Another article by T. F. Mc-
Allister, '18, said to be as stinging in
its denunciation of the proposed re-
turn to the conference as was his
"Mailed Fist and Itching Palm" of the
Michigan Union management, willtalso
be included.
"Co-education and HMichigan Ath-
letics" treated last month in an ar-
ticle by Maurice F. Dunne, '17L, is
the title of an article containing ex-
cerpts from letters answering the,
earlier article.
SAGINAW CLUB PLANS DANCE
DURING SPRING VACATION
At the second meeting of the Sag-
inaw club held last night in the stu-
dent Y. M. C. A., preparations were
made for the annual dance to be given
under the auspices of the club at
saginaw during the spring vacation.
It was also voted to determine upon
some arrangement whereby the spirit
of Michigan could be promulgated in
Saginaw in the hope of encouraging
more men to attend the University.
Prof. C. 0. Davis to Speak at Davidson
Prof. C. O. Davis will speak on
-'Modern Tendencies in Education" to-

Plans for Formal Opening of Lane
Hall Completed; Hold First Re-
ligious Meeting Sundayt
President Harry B. Hutchins will
be the principal speaker at the formal
opening of Lane hall Friday evening,
March 2. The opening will be held at
7:30 o'clock.
The other speakers for the occasion'
will be the Rev. Lloyd Douglas, and'
Mr. N. C. Fetter, general secretary of
the Y. M. C. A. Dr. Arthur Stalker
will offer prayer and Howard Haag,
'17, will introduce the speakers. An'
orchestra under the charge of Whit-
ley Moore, '18E, and. Abraham Gor-
netsky, '17, will render specially pre-'
pared music.
The builling will be open all day
Saturday for inspection and on Su
day the first religious meeting of the
year will be held in the new auditor-
ium. The speaker for this odoasion
will be Prof. John R. Allen of the
engineering college.
ADEILPHI ORATORS SPARKLE
AT 61ST ANNUAL BANQUET
Wit and viands mingled in equal
proportions at the 61st annual ban-
quet of the Adelphi house of represnt-
atives held at' the Cutting cafe last
night. Dr. A. E. Boak of the ancient
history department, delivered a com-
prehensive talk on the subject of
"Compulsory Military Training."
Glenn M. Coulter, '18L, president of
the Union, Victor H. Sugar, '16, K.
Warren Heinrich, '17E, Myron A.
Schlissel, '17L, speaker of the Adelphi,
and N. Earl Pinney, '16, gave short
talks on other matters of interest to
the society. Ralph M. Carson, '17,
acted as toastmaster.
The committee in charge of the ban-
quet consisted of the following: Henry
F. Massnick, '18, chairman; Howard D.
Moses, '18, and Helmuth Maag, '19.

Men interested in Red Cross courses
in first aid to the injured may meet
with Dr. H. H. Cummings of the Uni-
versity health service at 7:30 o'clock
tonight in the west amphitheater of
the Medical building. Dr. Cummings
will be at the city Y. M. C. A. at 7:30
o'clock tomorrow evening for con-
sultation with citizens of Ann Arbor
vho would like to enroll in the courses.
Owing to a conflict with the first aid
courses for women, the meetings
which were scheduled last night, were
postponed until tonight and tomorrow
night.
Examinations for the American Red
Cross certificates, conducted by Dr. F.
R. Towne, the examining offi-cer for
this district;, will be held on Satur-
day evening, March 10, in the base-
ment of the Homoeopathic hospital.
On account of the large number tak-
ing the examinations, one section will
meet from 10 to 12 o'clock, while the
other meeting will take place from 4
6 o'clock Saturday night. All those
ct- -ng to take the courses should
apply to Dr. Clyde B. Stouffer at the
University health service before the
time of. the meetings.
Pharmacy Dean's Health Improving
Dean Julius 0. Schlotterbeck of the

C. T. Stewart
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Buenos Aires, Feb. 27.-Argentina
has informally communicated with
Latin-American nations seeking a
combination of interests for peace in}
the world war, according to authorita-
tive information received today. The1
informal sanction of the American am-
bassador was specifically excluded. '
Argentina, it was said, does not re-
gard the United States as eligible to
such a proposed combination because'
of President Wilson's recent break
with Germany. The latest informa-
tion concerning the new attempt was'
that a favorable response to the feel-
ers had been received from Brazil.
One report today claimed that the
combination might be merely con-
vened "or humanitarian work in the
war, and as a joint expression of hope
for peace.
M. A. C. Girls Prefer Rice to 'Taters
East Lansing, Mich., Feb. 27.-The
home economics department of M. A.
C. has adopted rice as a partial sub-
stitute for potatoes in the women stu-
dents' dining clubs. The substitution
is made three times a week. The plan
brings hardly a murmur of protest.
The rice is served at dinner. No po-
tatoes are served with the rice, which
is boiled.
At Club C in the woman's building,
where approximately 300 eat, a saving
of'$8 a meal is reported.
The boys' clubsmay make a similar
substitution.
American Liner Finland Due Today
New York, Feb. 27.-The American
liner Finland will reach New York to-
morrow morning from Liverpool, ae-
cording to a statement made today by
the American line officers here.

Break with Germany
States Ineligible
bination

Makes Unified
to Com-

Burleson Reports to, Cabinet
These facts developed this afternoo
after Postmaster-General Burlesor
Wilson's legislative agent, had con
ferred with Chairman Flood of th
house committee. Burleson laid th
report of his trip to the capitol befor
the cabinet. It was decided under th
circumstances that no material mod
fication would be made in what th
president had asked of congress. Th
understanding was that Burleso
brought the president's disapproval c
the plan for eliminating the armamer
of ships which carried munitions, at
at the same time apparently carrie
Wilson's agreement to drop the othE
instrumentalities from the bill at- th
time.
After Postmaster-General Burleson
second visit to the house committe
it was said that President Wilso
wanted the bill to go through as o
iginally proposed. Representatih
Porter, however, proposes to fight fc
his amendment against the arming c
munition-carrying ships, and claim
to have sufficient Democrats with hi
to include them in the committee r
port.
LaFollette Opposes Measure.
Washington, Veb. 27.-The admini
tration's great five hundred millic
dollar navy bill, the largest single n
tional defense measure ever frame
is threatened with delay and possib
defeat through a one-man filibuster 1
Senator LaFollette, it was learned ti
afternoon. Since passage by the hou
the bill has been increased by t
senate by 128 millions of- dollars.
this 115 million dollars provides f
immediate completion r r vessels und
construction.

College of Pharmacy, is slowly im- bour gymnasium. It is expected that
proving in health. The dean has been a box will be ready to send next week
confined to his home since Christmas. to the American hospital at Paris.
During his illness the administration All women who are interested in the
of the pharmacy college has been con- work are urged to come next Tues-
ducted by Secretary A. B. Stevens. day.
YOU WILL BE INTERESTED TO HEAR
Prof. Louis A. Strauss

5 O'clock-Thursday

NEWBERRY HALL

P ..

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan