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February 25, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-25

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THE WEATHER
RISING TEMPERATURE
INCREASING CLOUDINESS

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UNITED PRES
DAY AND NIGHI
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 100.,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1917.

PRICE FIVE

_ _
e

ANNOUNCE CAST OF,
"FOOLS'PARoISE,
1917 'UNION, OPERA
WURSTER AND .'CAUGHEY TAKE
LEADING ROLES IN
PRODUCTION

May Get $400,000
Price Investigation
House Votes 83 to 5 for Appropriation
to Probe High Cost of
Food

MANY DELEGES
AT CONFERENCE

H~ark final Days,/
With Bitter Fight,

r

Republicans

Resort to Filibustering

INDIG NATION AT SINKING OF SEVEN
DUTCH SHIPS IN SUBMARiNE ZONE
SETS HOLLAND AAIS ERMA1

to Force an Extra
Session

WOOD
TO

AND CARLSON
APPEAR AGAIN

Allegorical Element Enters Into Play;
Williams and Watson Take
Comedy Parts
Final announcement of the cast for
"Fools' Paradise" to be presented in
Ann Arbor March 21, 22, 23, 24, was
made yesterday. The leading roles
are to be taken by F. J. Wurster, '17,
and R. J. McCaughey, '19. The final
selection of the cast is as follows:
Daisy Gardner, a charming young
girl who comes to Michigan to college
F. J. Wurster, '17.
Dick, who falls in love with Daisy, R.
J. McCaughey, '19.
Gwendolyn, a temperamental "co-ed"
who is looking for a husband, L. T
Donahue, '19.
Virginia, the haughty type of "co-
ed," C. W. Clark, '18.
( Myrtle McGovern, a telephone op-
erator, A. E. Zigler, '19.
Tubby, who aspires to be an ath-
lete, 0. G. Williams, '19.
Hiram, a "frosh," C. F. Watson, '17.
Georgie, M. C. Wood, '17.
Mr. Gardner, Daisy's father and
Dick's guardian, E. E. Hawkes, '17.
Prof. Bookery, a member of the fac-
ulty, 4. L. Hardy, '17.
Rev. Martin Supergood, a wearer of
the cloth, J. S. Kasberger, '18.
Tontagini, spirit of Michigan, H.
Carlson, '17.
Spirit of Folly, H. K. Keena, '19.
Pietro, a Spanish street singer, C.
A. Zanelli, '17E.
Sherman, the colored porter, H. W.
Goldstick, '17D.
Mandy, his sweetheart, L. B. Emer-
man, '18L.
Takes Leading Female Role
In the estimation of the commit-
tee in charge this cast represents the
best ability to be found on the cam-
pus. F. J. Wurster, '17, who takes the
leading female role, was a member of
last year's chorus and is an actor of
excellent ability as well as a splendid
dancer.
R. J. McCaughey, '19, playing op-
posite Daisy in the role of Dick, the
leading male character, makes his de-
but in college. theatricals in "Fools'
Paradise." Virginia and Gwendolyn
are two "co-eds" of entirely opposite
characteristics, and are somewhat
satirical of this phase of life at Michi-
gan. These parts are taken care of
by C. W. Clark, '18, and L. T. Dona-
hue, '19.
One of the finds of this year's opera
will be A. E. Zigler, '19, who fills the
role of the typical telephone oper-
ator. The huiorous roles of "Fools'
Paradise" are Tubby and Hiram, the
former to be taken by 0. G. Williams,
'19, and the latter by C. F. Watson,
'17.
X. C. Wood Familiar Actor
V. C. Wood, '17, needs no introduc-
tion, his excellent work in the past,
especially in "Tres Rouge" and in the
Comedy club productions marking him
as a worthy actor. E. E. Hawkes, '17,
who will play the part of, Daisy's fa-
ther, will be remembered as one of
tle leading characters in last year's
play, where he doned feminine attire.
Jis splendid baritone voice makes him
a valuable asset to'this year's produc-
tion.
Professor Bookery will be the part
played by R. L. Hardy, '17, and offers
an opportunity for some clever acting
as well as some excellent humor. J.
S. Kaberger, '18, who played the part
of a valet in "Tres Rouge" with re-
.markable ability, will try his hand at,
an entirely different role this year,
appearing as the Rev. Martin Super-
good.
H. Carlson, '17, who has often ap-
peared in various performances in the

past will be seen in the role of Ton-.
tagini, spirit of Michigan. In combina-
tion with H. K. Kenna, '19, who will
play the part of the spirit of folly, he
will represent the allegorical element
in "Fools' Paradise." Pietro, a Spanish
street singer. will be the part assigned

Washington, Feb. 24. - President
Wilson will get his $400,000 investiga-
tion by the federal trade commission
of the food situation if the house can
give it to him. By a vote of 83 to 51,
the house, serving as a committee of
the whole, tonight adopted an amend-
ment by Representative Borland of
Missouri appropriating $400,000 for a
general food investigation by the com-
mission. Practically all the Demo-
crats and many Republicans on. the
floor supported the amendment. It is
believed the senate will sustain the
house's action.
The Borland proposal was bitterly
fought by Chairman Fitzgerald of the
appropriations committee, who sug-
gested a food embargo. Other Dero-
crats known to have little faith in the
ability of the commission to relieve
the situation joined Fitzgerald.
Borland declared every source of
food supply is controlled by huge in-
terests that cannot be dissolved with-
out the aid of every possible depart-
ment.
"We need no investigation," Fitz-
gerald said. "The reason for advanced
prices is obvious. The people of the
United States require six bushels of
wheat per capita a year. We have
100,000,000 people. Our last wheat
crop was 600,000,000 bushels. In the
last year we have exported, I believe,
about 300,000,000 bushels to Europe.
That doesn't need investigation.
"A flat food embargo will give the
president discretionary power to de-
clare an embargo. We must feed 'our
people first. When people are crying
for food it will be horrible cruelty ii
the best we can do is to make an in-
vestigation."

Student Volunteer Convention Taxes
New "Y" Building to
Capacith
VISITORS INSPECT PRINCIPAL
BUILDINGS OF THE UNIVERSITY
Missionairies Talk on Foreign Lands
During Second Meeting of
Volunteers

Lane Hall to Be
Opened Friday

I

Prof.

J. R. Allen to Speak at General
"Get-Together" Sunday,
Afternoon

The meetings of the student volun-
teer conference which were held yes-
terday taxed the capacity of Lane hall
to the utmost. Record crowds of dele-
gates were in attendance at all meet-
ings and extra chairs had to be pro-
vided for late arrivals.
Morning Session
The program for the second day of
the conference was opened at 8:30
o'clock yesterday morning by an as-
sembly presided over by Fennel P.
Turner, general secretary. Reports of
what is going on in the colleges of
the state regarding missionary work
were made by the delegates who were
organized in units according to their
colleges.
The first speaker to address the sec-
ond meeting of the day was W. J. Van
Kersen, who spoke on "The Four Es-
sentials of a Great Life." Mrs. R. Reed
McClure of Punjab, India, next spoke
on -'Perseverence," the facts for her
address having been collected during
her missionary work in India.
Afternoon Session
The afternoon session began at 1:30
o'clock in Lane hall and the first
speaker introduced was James H.
Lewis. The subject of the address
was "Why Be a Missionary in China."
Mr. Lewis discussed the Chinese peo-
ple from every viewpoint and showed
why American missionaries should be
sent to the Far East.
A tour of the campus, conducted by
some of the 104 ,Ann Arbor delegates,
was made from 4 until 5:30 o'clock.
The principal buildings of the Uni-
versity were visited and inspected.
Campus guide books were issued by
President Harry B. Hutchins for the
use of the delegates. A twilight re-
cital was given afterwards in Hill
auditorium.
Evening Session
The evening session was addressed
by J. K. Birge, Mrs. McClure, Mr. Mc-
Naughton, and Dr. Ussher. Mr. Birge
spoke on "Education," Mr. McNaugh-
ton on "Evangelistic Work in Turkey,"
Mrs. McCure on "India," and Dr.
Ussher on "A Conflict with the Gov-
ornor-General."
The program for today's church
services was announced as follows:
Dr. Clarence D. Ussher, returned med-
ical missionary, at the First Presby-
terian church; J. K. Birge, professor
in charge of Turkish department of
International college, at the First
Congregational 'church; J. H. Lewis
at the First Methodist church; Mrs.
H. B. Montgomery at the First Baptist
church, and George Innes at the
Church of Christ, Scientist. These
speakers will talk at the regular morn-
ing services of the churches. In the
evening Mrs. McClure and Mrs. Mont-
gomery will speak at the Presbyterian
church. C. F. Angell will demonstrate
plays and games for large groups of
people at 6:30 o'clock at the Methodist
church.

By ROBERT J. BENDER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Feb. 24.--Blazing the
way with bitter partisan invectives
Republicans and Democrats tonight
launched forth on the most spectacu-
lar finish fight any dying congress
ever staged.
That the Repulicans want to force
an extra session which would bring
into being a congress with more Re-
publicans than thepresent one has
been admitted. That the Democrats
a- attempting to whip their party
into line to prevent this, pass the ad-
ministration pet bills and then quit,
leavng President Wilson to "go it
alone" in the international situation,
was also perfectly plain.
Republican leaders declare and
Democratic laders admit the sena'te
at least will remain in session straight
on through tonight, Sunday, and Mon-
day if necessary until March 4, when
congress dies a perfectly natural
death.
After a day of filibustering by Re-
publicans real sparks began to fiy.this
afternoon. The old political war
horses, Senators Williams, Democrat,
.and Lodge, Republican, fired charge
and counter charge across the floor.
Democrats, in efforts to discredit the
purpose voiced by Republicans in mak-
ing the filibuster, declared it is
prompted by the voice of the corpora-
tions crying out against the revenue
bill and its heavy assessments against
corporations.
In the face of all the turmoil and
strife Republicans and Democrats are
absolutely agreed on one big point.
That is that if the Republicans persist
in their filibuster threat they can go
through with it and utterly doom every
piece of legislation remaining.
Senator Smoot, old guard leader, ad-
initted this afternoon that if the presi-
dent withdraws his pressure for a
resolution which will empower him to
handle any contingency in the inter-
national situation short of war, the
Republican warriors will be called off,
2ent home to bed and the second ses-
sion of the 64th congress will be al-
lowed to die a perfectly respectful and
peaceful death.
Soldier Writes
Inlander Article
Mismanagement of Guardsmen at Bor-
der to Be Described in Feb-
ruary Number
"The Border Patrol" is the title of
an article to appear in the Inlander
,hich will be ready for distribution
about Wednesday. This has been writ-
ten by a member of the national guard,
and aside from its literary excellence
possesses some word pictures of the
riotous confusion and mismanagement
that were so much in evidence but ac-
counts of which have so rarely found
their way into the columns of the
press.
A short story, "It Is Human to Err,"
portrays life in Warsaw, and with its
simplicity of style seeks to define the
world-old undercurrent of spiritual
unrest, the national gloom and hope-
lessness, and the ancient customs and
traditions of the Russian people.

MARCHERS DEMAND
LOWER FOOD PRICES
New York, Feb. 24.-Within the
shadow of the famous Madison
Square Garden thousands of New
Yorkers gathered this afternoon
and demanded that the price of
bread and potatoes be brought
within their reach. It was a throng
of women and children, some 6,000
of them, crying their protest
against prevailing food prices. The
marchers carried potatoes, onions
and other vegetables stuck on
spiked sticks. Some of the women
walked miles to take part.
Meantime Governor Whitman
was meeting with George W. Per-
kins, chairman of the state food in-
vestigation committee. The gov-
ernor said he was willing to send
an emergency message to the legis-
lature Monday empowering the city
to purchase and sell food supplies
in an effort to break the present
high prices.
CONFERENCE WELCOMES
PRELiMINARY ACTION

WESTERN BODY UNANIMOUS
FAVORING 1tICHIGAN'S
RETURN

IN

Lane hall, the new building of the
University Y. M. C. A., will be form-
ally opened at 7:30 o'clock next Fri-
day night, March 2. It will be held in
the large auditorium. There will be a
list of speakers, whose names will
be announced later. Music for the oc-
casion will be provided for by an or-
chestra under the charge of Whitley
Moore, '18E, assisted by Abraham
Gornetsky, 17.
The building will be open all day
Saturday, March 3 for the inspection
of visitors. -An orchestra will fur-
nish music for this occasion.
The will be a general "get-to-
gether" in the new building Sunday
afternoon at 5 o'clock for the "Y"
members. The first religious meeting
of the year will be held at 6:30 o'clock
in the auditorium. The speaker for
this occasion will be Prof. John R.
Allen of the engineering college.
VILLA ORDERS CONCENTRATION
OF TROOPS; PREDICT CLASH
El Paso, Feb. 24.-Siinltaneous at-
tacks against Juarez and Chihuahua
City have been ordered by Pancho
Villa. Villista troops are now being
concentrated in the vicinity of both
cities. The vanguard of the Chihua-
hua attacking force already . has
reached the outskirts of that city and
United States government agents
closely watching Villista movements
predict an early clash.
The force ordered to attack Juarez
is mobilizing at Padre Durkes' ranch
near Rancheria, 60 miles south of
Juarez with Manuel Ochoa in com-
mand. Villa himself is reported to
have left his headquarters at Bustillos
and at the. head of 1,000 men to be
moving northward into the Casas
Grandes country.
EIGHT AMERICANS ABOARD
LINER BOUND FOR WAR ZONE
New York, Feb. 24.-Aboard the Cun-
ard liner Orduna, eight more Ameri-
cans are speeding tonight toward the
German submarine danger zone having
.sailed from New York this afternoon
accompanied by the cheers and sob-
bing of one of the most de'monstrative
gatherings that has bid Godspeed to a
ship since the early days of the war.

That the conference colleges will
welcome Michigan's return to the fold
is shown by the extremely cordial
comment that the recent action of the
board in control and the entry of the
Wolverine track team i the Illinois
relay games has caused among Big
Nine officials and newspapers. Min-
nesota and Ohio States, staunch
friends of Michigan, were expected to'
look upon the probable return of the
Wolverines with favor. The action of
some of the other colleges, however,
was doubtful and the whole-hearted
manner in which they are holding out
the hand of welcome is highly grati-
fying to Michiganders.
ilini Gives Welcome
The Daily Illini, University of Il-
linois student paper, in an editorial
on the entrance of the Wolverine
track team in the Illinois indoor meet,
says:
"By voting to allow Michigan to com-
pete in the Illinois relay carnival on
March 3, the faculty representatives
on the conference board -showed that
they, at least, would probably not an-
tagonize the return of the Wolverines
to the Big Nine. The old wound is
healing, it seems. This is pleasing to
all who wish for the prodigal's return.
No one expects the present members
of the conference to bow down to
Michigan, to entreat her to return,
and to readjust the conference rules so
that they will be favorable to Michi-
gan should she. return. But at the
same time, the return of Michigan is
so extremely advisable that we sould
not demand that the Wolverines pros-
trate themselves before us and beg to
be received into the fold. Michigan
would add a tone to the conference
which to us seems desirable. We
should be willing to meet her half-way
in any peace move. We shall all be
glad to see the Ann Arbor boys, com-
peting in the armory on March 3.
Prof. Thomas F. Moran, chairman of
the conference governing board, ex-
pressed himself as pleased at the ac-
tion of the Michigan board. He said
that the Wolverines' return would
make the conference a better organ-
ization.
Up to Michigan
Prof. Charles J. Sembower, head of
the University of Indiana athletic com-
mittee, said: "Indiana would gladly
welcome Michigan back. I think that
this is the feeling among all other
members of the conference. It is only
a question as to whether Michigan
would be willing to accept the rules
of the conference."'
Professor French, chairman of Ohio
(Continued on Pafe Four.)

DUTCH PRESS CALLS IT "LOS
HONOR" AND "GREATEST
HUMILIATION"
TEN SHIPS REPORTI
SUNK; THREE BRITI
No Lives Are Lost When Tonnas
35,000 Is Sent to Bottom
by U-Boats
The Hague, Feb. 24.-The acute
of Holland's relations with Germ
was emphasized tonight by ger
expressions of indignation at noe'
attacks on seven Dutch ships in
German submarine zone. The ten
was increased by the announceine
the foreign minister that Gem
some time ago had practically ag
to exempt Dutch ships from attac
to Feb. 22, "but could not guara
absolute safety." The seven-
sunk all went dow on Feb. 22.
Stocks on the Bourse reflected
general feeling in Holland, drop
off rapidly on receipt of the news. I
ing over the submarine attacks
heightened by an official statemen
night which claimed the seven s
were torpedoed with the usual
liminary examination of ship pa
by officers of the submarines.
Dutch newspapers this afterntoo
flected the serious view of the w
Dutch nation. "This is our gre
humiliation since the war began,
Glared the Amsterdam Telegraaf.
confess we do not longer see how .
land's honor is to 'be upheld by
test."
"It is difficult to preserve self-
tro in the face of such actiom
war," asserted theM"eweVanden"
"The sinking of seven ships sb
the submarine warfare is prose
by Germany in a manner absolu
contemptuous of the rights and ii
ests of Holland," declared the I
delsbaad. "Certainly America w
not tolerate such actions."
Dutch Liner Reported kwcape
London, Feb. 24.-The Dutch I
Menado, reported sunk with six o
Dutch ships on Feb. 22, was atta
by a German submarine but esc
and was brought into harbor, acci
ing to a Lloyd's dispatchtonight,-
same source was authority for
statement that the Dutch liners Z
boeny, Eemland and Vaandijk, w
were also attacked, may still be al
Germany's unbridledg submarine
seemed late tonight to have broi
Holland to the point of rupture -
Berlin.
Crews of the sunken Dutch ships
rived here today. The full perso'
of all seven were reported s
With the seven Dutch ships today'
port of shipping sunk in the war
totaled 10 vessels of a tonnag
more than 35,000 tons. The other't
were British-the 3,000-ton ste
Trojan Prince, the 1,000-ton ste
Grenadir, and the 3,000-ton ste
Longhurst.
SIXTY STEAMERS WILL CIR7
RELIEF CARGOES TO BELGI
New York, Feb. 24.-Sixty steal
their cargoes valued at several
lion dollars, will sail from UI
States ports within the next few
carrying relief supplies to Belg
The Belgian commission announce
night that an arrangement with C
Britian and Germany has resulte
establishment of an open lane thr<
the submarine zone through whic
relief commission's ships may t
in safety from Amerian ports to
terdam.

Hold Sunday Meetings at "Y" Buil
Under the name of the Union s
class, a series of six meetings 1
been planned to be held Sunday
the new "Y" building to discuss w
missions, and world 'peace. The-
gram for the one to be held toda
as follows: Bible reading and pra
led by Mrs. G. G.. Crozer; ora
"The Abandoned Peace Palace,'
Miss Lois May, and address, "War
the Kingdom," Mr. N. C. Fetter.
meetings will be held at 7:30 o'cl

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division

STUDENT VOLUNTEER CONFERENCE

10:30 a. m.

Dr Clarence Ussier

7:30 Tappan Address

Dr. George Innes

r j
-{
WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
Sames Schermerhorn
PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER OF THE DETROIT TIMES .
MI Subject: "Answer to Advertisement: The Plaint of a
SPewhold er-
Tonight t Tonight
7:30 Methodist Church 7:30
- IIEREEIEE5EEEEEIEEBEIRBBRREoa88688885%

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