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February 23, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-23

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW
TODAY

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UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 98. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1917. PRICE FIVE C

ATHLETIC

BOARD

VOTES

8

1

FOR

RE- ENTERING

CONFERENC

f

WOLERIES TIE
SYRACUSE 43-43
BYTKING RELAY
MICHIGAN OVERCOMES EARLY
LEAD IN FINAL
EVENT
CROSS BREAKS GYM
SHOT PUT RECORD
Captain Carroll Wins Easy Mile But
Loses Half; Meet Hotly
Contested
Syracuse, N. Y., Feb. 22.-(Special)
-By a great sprint in the last lap of
the relay race, Le Scofield, Wolverine
anchor man, broke the tape inches
ahead of his Orange rival and made
the final score of tonight's Syracuse-
Michigan indoor meet a 43-43 tie. Up
to the finish of this race the Meth-
odists had been leading 43 to 38.
The meet was one of the most hotly
contested ever witnessed in Archbold
gymnasium. Two Syracuse indoor
records went by the board, Cross of
Michigan shattering the mark in the
shot put with a heave of 44 feet 6
inches, and Captain Newkirk of Syra-
cause lowering the time in the half
mile when he negotiated the distance
in 2 minutes 2 and 2-5.seconds.
Captain Carroll of the Maize and
Blue squad was not pressed in the
mile and won the race hands down in
4 minutes 33 and 2-5 seconds. He also
ran in the half, but was forced to ac-
cept third place, Newkirk and Peter-
son of Syracuse leading him to the
tape.,
O'Brien Takes Dash
Bowser, Syracuse's colored sprinter,
gladdened the hearts of Orange track
followers when he beat out O'Brien of
Michigan by a hair in the 40-yard dash,
showing a return to the form he dis-
played in 1915. O'Brien, however,
came back in the longer dash, winning
in easy fashion. The Orange timber-
toppers scored a slam in the 45-yard
hurdles, Beardsley, Michigan's lone
entry, being distanced.
Baumgartner showed good form in
the pole vault, which he copped with
a soar of11 feet 6 inches, half a foot
higher than Kesler of Michigan could
do. Simmons and Ellis, Syracuse's
star in the high jump,,tied at 5 feet
10 inches.
Individual honors went to Ellis, with
nine points. The tall one landed first
in the high hurdles and tied for
premier honors in the high jump.
O'Brien of Michigan and Peterson of
Syracuse were knotted for second with
eight counters apiece. Captains New-
kirk and Carroll each managed to
gather six points for their respective
teams.
Lead in Meet Wavers
The first event of the evening ended
with Michigan in the lead, which she
held until Syracuse cleaned the boards
in the high hurdles and assumed the
front position with a count of 15-12.
The Orange held this position through
four events, but lost it again when the
Wolverines copped first and second in
- the 300-yard dash, giving them a five-
point edge. Eight points in the half
again allowed the Methodists to forge
ahead, with Michigan finally equalling
the score in the relay.
The summaries:
Shot put-Cross (M), first; Smith
(M), second; Sohultz (S), third. Dis-
tance, 44 feet 6 inches.
40-yard dash-Bowser (S), first;
(Continued en Page Six.)

DATE HISTORY,
OF CONFERENCE
1895-Organized at the suggestion
of President James B. Angell
of Michigan.
1905-New rules made necessary
following numerous football
fatalities.
1906-Adopt one-year residence
rule, reduction of number of
games, abolition of training
table adopted.
1907-Regents indicate to board in
control desire to withdraw.
Board votes against such ac-
tion.
1907-Makeup of board in control
changed.
1908-Board in control votes 5-3 to
withdraw.
1910-"Boycott" rule passed to
keep Minnesota a member.
1912-Athletic captains ask that
Michigan be returned.
1913-Board in control votes for re-
turn, 6-5. Senate council
concurs. Regents oppose fol-
lowingtunfavorable action of
student body.
1917-Board In control votes for
return, 8-1.
CONFERENCE MOVE
Faculty and Students Express Their
Approval of Return to
Big ine
FEW DISSENTING OPINIONS
MET IN DAILY INTERVIEWS
Many Who Opposed Question in 1918
Change Views; Desire
Natural Rivals
Faculty and students of the Univer-
sity with scarcely a dissenting voice
yesterday expressed themselves as
heartily in favor of a return to the
conference. Many who had vigorously
opposed such action when the question
came up for discussion in the fall of
1913 have now signified their desire to
see Michigan again competing with
her natural rivals. Portions of the
interviews are as follows:
Faculty
Prof. R. W. Aigler, chairman board
in control of athletics-"A highly de-
sirable action. I can speak no more
loudly than by my vote cast at the
board in control meeting."
Prof. J. R. Brumm, referee during
conference debate in 1913-"Two years
ago I was opposed to a return, but
recent developments have forced me
to change my views."
Prof. L. M. Gram, member board in
control of athletics--"I am heartily in'
favor of a return to the conference. It
would be a good thing in every way."
Prof. W. D. Henderson-"I am very
much in favor of a return."
Prof. Evans Holbrook, former mem-
ber of board in control of athletics-
"I have always ben opposed to a
severence of relations with the con-
ference teams. I think that we ought
to go back and hope we 'will."
Prof. C. B. Vbber--"I have ever
been opposed to the withdrawal of
Michigan from the conference."
Prof. A. S. Whitney, former chair-
man board in control of athletics-
"The time seems to be ripe for a re-
turn to the conference. Only a few
points of difference seem to form the
basis of the present separation."
(Continued on Page Six)

It Is Always darkest iefore the Dawn

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PETITION REGENTS TO TAKE ACTION ALLO.WING
SENATE COUNCIL VETO POWER OVER BOAR'S
ACTIONS LEADING TO RETURN TO BIG,, NIl

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Return to Conference Will Require
Slight Changes in Iichigan Rules

If Michigan returns to the westernj
conference, five existing Michigan'
rules will have to be changed slightly,
with a few additional modifications in
eligibility requirements. There are a
number of particulars in which Mich-
igan's rules will not have to le chang-
ed, contrary to the current opinion.
Michigan will not have to play any
stated number of conference teams in
football or any other sport. She will
not have to play a single conference
team if she does not wish to. Her ath-
letic coaches will not have to be facul-
ty members. She can still take part
in eastern intercollegiate track meets
under eastern rules. Her athletes can
still eat together at training tables.
Need Five Alterations
There are five rules which will have
to be changed, however. The Michi-
gan faculty, or some executive body of
the faculty as the Senate council, will
exercise a veto power. The present
board in control of athletics can still
be retained. With the faculty already'
represented on the board, this change
will not be revolutionary.
The football season will be limited
to seven games. This will cut out the
two early mid-week contests, for
which practice games with the fresh-
men can be substituted. The season
must close on the Saturday before
Thanksgiving, as is already provided
by a Michigan rule.
Michigan will not be able to play

more than 12 baseball or 12 basketball
games with the conference teams each
season, but her number of contests
with teams outside the conference will
not be limited. Fall football training
could not start before Sept. 15, but at
present Michigan does not 'begin fall
training until an even later date.
Eliminate All-Fresh Games
If Michigan returns to the confer-
ence she will have to give up outside
competition for her freshman teams.
The All-fresh will be limited to prac-
tice games with the scrubs, reserves,
and Varsity, and will sit on the side-
lines at every Varsity contest. Coach
Yost is only one of those interested
who believe that such a course will be
of more benefit than playing a four
or five game schedule and missing
most of the Varsity games.
Michigan's athletic association would
pay no part of the board served at the
training table, whereas the association
now pays the difference between the
current rate of board in Ann Arbor
and the actual cost of the food serv-
ed. The teams could still meet to-
gether and eat food served under the
direction of a trainer.
Michigan's athletic coaches would
have to be named by the board of
regents, but the board in control of
athletics would still have the power to
make recommendations, so that there
would probably be no difference in ef-
fect.

GOVERNING BODY EXPECTED TO TAKE UP
RESOLUTIONS AT MEETING
THIS MORNING
RESOLUTION OF BOARD
"Whereas: In the opinion of this board, athletic competition with
the members of the western intercollegiate conference will be for the
best interests of the Universiy of Michigan, and
"Whereas, As the first step in the resumption of such competition
it is necessary that there be such a change in our scheme of athletic
control that Michigan have faculty control of athletics,
"Be it therefore resolved: That this board does hereby recom-
mend to the honorable board of regents tha% legislation be by them
enacted providing in effect that the actions of the board in control of
athletics shall be reported to the senate council of the University and
which council shall be vested with power of veto over such actions.
"Resolved, That if the board of regents adopt the recommenda-
tion just transmitted, it is the sense of this board that steps should be
taken to resume membership in the western intercollegiate confer-
ence, and the committee whose report was received in this meeting be
authorized and directed to take such further steps as from their
knowledge of the facts are necessary to get us back into the confer-
ence."
Michigan will compete with members of the western intercollegiate
conference as soon as the schedules at present arranged have been played
out, if the board of regents, which meets this morning, adopts the reso-
lution framed at yesterday afternoon's special session of the athletic board.
A petition will be laid before the Regents today, outlining the present dif-
ficulties in securing proper competition and presenting the advantages to be
gained by a return to the conference.
The vote taken on the athletic board yesterday showed eight in favor
and one opposed to a return to the conference. Judge Murfin of Detroit, who
was looked upon as the one possibility to vote against a return, explained that
out of defense to the wishes of the Detroit alumni he would vote in the affirm-
ative. James Duffy, alumni member from Bay City, cast the sole ballot
- REFUE-T against the resolution. No reason was
REGENTS REFUSE TO given for the action of Mr. Duffy.
MAKE PREDICTIONS Comes After Months of Study
In a statement after the meeting,
Members of Governing Board Reticent Chairman Ralph W. Aigler said that
in Commenting on Meeting's the action taken by the board had fol-
Possibilities lowed months of careful deliberation
and consideration of every angle of the
Members of the board of regents situation. These investigations are
were reticent when asked for their now known to have included informal
>pinions in regard to the resolutions vists and talks with practically all
in members of the conference, as well as
yesterday adopted by the board in a formal meeting in Chicago last Sat-
control, and which are to be passed urday between the representatives of
upon at today's meeting. every conference college except one,
"We are unable to express an opin- and a committee of the board in con-
on of the resolutions as adopted by trol of athletics made up of Professors
he board in control of athletics until Aigler and Gram.
Two members of the board were not
we have heard some discussion upon present yesterday. John Hibbard of
the subject, previous to their being Chicago did not communicate to the
passed upon," said Regent L. L. Hub- board his attitude on the conference
bard in an interview last night. question, but Dr. Reuben Peterson,
"I can not make any statement as faculty representative, who could not
o the outcome of the Regents' meet- attend, advised the board by letter
that he was in favor of any action to-
ng," replied Regent Junius E. Beal in ward the resumption of membership
nswer to an inauir from The Dail. in the conference

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DEVOTION TO COUNTRY
SPEAKER UPHOLDS POSITION OF
UNITED STATES AS
EXAMPLE
"A patriotism that means a devotion
to ideals and to one's country, as the
exemplar of those ideals, is the noblest
passion that can find lodgement in the
human breast, and it is a passion
weak, indeed, if it does not inspire to
live, to fight and die, if need be, for
those ideals and for the country in
which they find expression." These
were the words of Charles H. Hamill
of the Chicago bar in his address on
"Patriotism and International Rela-
tions" before an audience of 400 per-
sons in the law building yesterday
morning.
He conceives patriotism to be loy-
alty to national ideals which are also
individual ideals. He continued: "The
one great fundamental ideal of this
government is the protection and pres-
ervation of the liberties of the indi-
(Continued on Page Three.)

* PROPHECY VOICED BY *
* " PRESIDENT HUTCHINS *

*

*

* President Harry B. Hutchins re- *
* fused to comment on the action *
* of the board in control yesterday, *
* leading to a return to the confer- *
* ence. The statements made by *
* President Hutchins, then dean of *

*
*

the Law school, at the time Mich- *
igan withdrew from the confer- *
ence, are significant in the light *
of subsequent events. *
"I think that the student body *
will very soon see that they made *
a big mistake when they voted to *
leave the conference. The west- *
ern schools are our natural rivals *
and the students in these schools *
have about the same standard of *
scholarship. I. don't know what *
is required of athletes in the east- *
ern schools, but I understand that *
in some of the institutions a man's *
physical ability is all that is re- *
quired. We are foolish in trying *
to compete with such schools."- *
Chicago Record-Herald, Dec. 5, *
1908. *

When Regent H. C. Bulkley of De-
troit was called on long distance he
seemed to express some surprise that
the question 'of a return to the con-
ference might be brought up at to-
day's meeting, but stated that he was
unable to make any prediction as to
the final outcome, nor would he make
known his personal inclinations in
the matter.
Up to a late hour last night, all ef-
forts to get into touch with the other
Regents proved futile, but it is ex-
pected that all with the exception of
Regent Gore will be present at the
discussion of the conference resolu-
tions this morning.

Look for Favorable Action Today
Just what the Regents will do to-
day is beyond conjecture at this time.
Three classes of individuals are rep-
resented on the athletic board alumni
students and faculty. The fact thai
this board, which has been created tc
fully investigate the various problems
of Michigan athletics and make recom-
mendations in regard to them, has by
such a large majority put itself on
record as favoring a return to the
conference as the solution to Michi-
gan's athletic ills, would seem to in-
dicate that the Regents will take fa-
vorable action.
(Continued on Page Six)

V -

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earing

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