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February 21, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW
TODAY

I

r Sit i6w

41v

UNITED PRE.
DAY AND NIGH'
WIRE SERVICE

0

VOL. XXVII. No. 96. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1917. PRICE FIVE C

_

SHOW INTEREST IN
HIGHWAYCURSE
Record Attendance Hears Lectures in
First Day of Good Roads
Convention
TODAY'S FIRST TALK WILL BE
DELIVERED BY PROF. W. C. ROAD

Faculty Grants
Eighteen Degrees

Literary College Gives Out Eleven
B. and Seven B. S. Di-
plomas

A.

Subject is "The Maintenance of
Roads." Good Program
Promised .

Earth

The short course in highway en-
gineering which is now in progress is
having a record attendance ,and con-
siderable interest is shown on all
sides for the godd roads movement.
Several good papers were given yes-
terday and the program for today also
promises well.
Today's program for the course fol-
lows:.
9:00 o'clock-"The Maintenance of
Earth Roads," by Prof. W. C. Hoad.
10:00 o'clock-"Sand Clay Roads in
Marquette County," by K. I. Sawyer.
11:00 o'clock-"Road Machinery," by
L. C. Smith.
:30 o'clock-"Screening and Wash-
ing Gravel for Surfacing Roads in Cal-
houn County," by A. A. McKay.
3:0 o'clock-Recess.
3:30 o'clock-"Gravel and Macadam
Roads in Iron County," by A. L. Bur-
ridge.
4: 30o'clock--"Gravel Roads," by L.
H. Neilson.
8 o'clock-"The Experience of New
Hampshire with Gravel Roads under
Various Kinds and Intensities of Traf-
fic," by F. E. Everette.
The short course will last through-
out the week, with the lectures in
room 348 of the engineering building
and the laboratory work in the high-
way laboratory of the University. Any-
one interested is permitted to take the
course without charge, and should reg-
ister in room 347 of the engineering
building.
G. O.P. NOMINATES
AT CONVENTION
John W. Stone and Franz Buhn Named
for Supreme Court Justice at
Detroit Session
Detroit, Feb. 20.- The Republican
state convention in session this after-
noon made the following nominations
for Justice of the Supreme . Court:
John W. Stone of Marquette, Franz
Buhn of Mount Clemens. Fred M.
Keeler was on the first ballot of nom-
inations for membership on the state
board of education, Adams W. Nadal
of Olivet received 556 votes, P. E. John-
ston of Clendendon, 487 votes; and E.
M. Freeland of Grand Rapids, 392
votes. On the final count the nomina-
tion of Nadal of Olivet, was made un-
animous.
For the membership on the state
board of agriculture the convention
renominated Jason Woodman of Paw
Paw, and John W. Beaumont of De-
troit, present members.
PARCELS LEFT ON MAIL BOXES
NO LONGER TO BE COLLECTED
Parcels left upon mail boxes for col-
lection by the carrier, will not receive
attention, according to word recently
issued by Postmaster Abbott. It is
said that the mail gatherers are great-
ly delayed by being forced to pick up
these parcels, and that such a practice
'was moreover prohibited by postal
regulations.
Many times the packages are placed
upon the boxes with insufficient post-
age to convey them, and greater delay
is caused, since the consigner must
be notified of the shortage before it
may be sent upon its way.
"If you wish your parcel sent," said
the official, "you must take it to the
postoffice or to the sub-stations.'

Eighteen diplomas were granted by
the faculty of the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts at its meeting
held last Monday night. The degrees
given and the graduates who received
them follow:
Bachelor of Arts: F. L. Blood, W.
S. Chang, J. E. Chenot, D. C. Holub, S.
E. Katz (with special mention in psy-
chology), F. H. Kerwin, I. H.. Polozker,
P. H. Reynolds, T. G. Thurston, Mil-
dred Treat, L. J. Wilhartz (with dis-
tinction).
Bachelor of Science: C. M. Ander-
son, H. L. Kennedy, R. E. Whitney.
Bachelor of Science in Forestry: M.
B. Kannowski, F. D. Newbrook, C. E
Stteeter.
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry:
Ching Tsang Ho.
At the meeting the following were
also recommended for the teacher's di-
ploma: F. L. Blood, Marie I. Rasey
C. E. Young.
'frlerrima ' Hero
Speaks on Liquor
Captain Richmond P. obson Gives
Addrcs Tonight at Presby-
terian Church
Captain Richmond P. Hobson will
speak on "Dry Amcrica and a Sober
World" at the First Presbyterian
church at 7:30 o'clock tonight. This
address is one of a series being de-
livered under the supervision of the
Anti-Saloon league.
Captain Hobson will be remembered
as the commander of the collier Mer-
rimac, which was sunk at the mouth
of Sanitago harbor during the Span-
ish-American war, in an effort to bot-
tle up the ships of the Spanish fleet.
Mr. Hobson has had wide experience
in the naval service and the construc-
tion of warships and is a well known
advocate of American naval suprem-
acy and American leadership in an
international movement for universal
peace. He is a lecturer, speaker and
wiriter of note.
U.S. SAYS CUBANS'
REVOLT MUST STOP
State Department Declares Revolution
Is Unconstitutional and
Must Cease
Washington, Feb. 20.-The United
States minister at Havana has notified
the revolutionary leaders in Cuba that
the revolution against the constitu-
tional government of Cuba is consid-
ered, by the United States government,
as a serious and unconstitutional act
and will not be allowed to continue
longer, the state department an-
nounced this afternoon.
Washington, Feb. 20.-The Washing-
ton legation today notified the state
department that 20 American consuls
and their families left Munich for
Switzerland this morning.
Ypsilanti Normal Inspected by Solons
Ypsilanti, Mich., Feb. 20.-A com-
mittee of the legislature composed of
Senators Murtha, Willison and For-
ester and Representatives Amon, Reed,
Duel and Blynn inspected the build-
ings of the Michigan State Normal col-
lege Friday and ascertained what is
needed at the normal.
Rooms Provided for Women Smokers
London, Feb. 20.-Cigaret smoking
has become so universal among women
war workers that some of the London
suburban railways have decided to re-

serve ladies' smoking compartments
on certain trains.

FRAN K TRAVELER, WILL
LECTURE HERE TONIGHT'
SUBJECT OF WANDERER'S TALK
"AFOOT THROUGH SOUTH
AMERICA"
Harry A. Franck. '03, traveler, au-
thor, and lecturer, will deliver his ad-
dress "Afoot Through South Amer-
ica" at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill audi-
torium, illustrating it with 150 hand-
colored slides made from photographs
which he personally took during his
travels.
Mr. Franck is by no means the or-
dinary travelogue lecturer, his daring
and adventurous nature and his meth-
od of doing his traveling almost en-
tirely on foot, insuring the recounting
of adventures which do not ordinarily
befall the average tourist.
During his travels in South Amer-
ica he walked over 5,000 miles and
visited every country south of the Rio
.rande river. The trip lasted exactly
four years, and in his lecture Mr.
Franck will especially discuss hisone
year's journey which took him from
the capital of Colombia down to
Cuzco, the ancient capital of the
Incas.
Mr. Franck is the author of one of
the most unusual travel books which
,,as ever been written. He entitled it
"A Vagabond's Journey Around the
World" and the name is to be taken as
literal. Mr. Franck says that it was
as a junior or a senior in the Uni-
versity that he conceived the idea of
traveling around the world without
a cent. For the first year after gradu-
ation he taught French in the Central
high school of Detroit, and then he
started on his trip around the globe,
completing it in 16 months. He adds
that the writing of the book was merely
an afterthought.
Mr. Franck has contributed several
articles to the Alumnus and it was in
this magazine that his first Writing
appeared. It is an account of his en-
counter with armed robbers near
Nazareth in Palestine. The highway-
men were Bedouins and were armed
with muskets, but this did not deter
Mr. Franck. He says that he attacked
them with rocks, thus utilizing his
early baseball training which he had
received in the University.
In offering his lecture to the public
Mr. Franck said, "Let me say that
in honor of old Michigan I should like
to offer a little more than the usual
program."
Prof. T. C. Trueblood of the oratory
department will entertain Mr. Franck
and a number of his old friends and
instructors at the Union today, and
in the evening W. B. Shaw, '03, editor
of the Alumnus and a classmate of
Mr. Franck, will entertain him at his
home.
TAKES "OWN RISK",
STATES GERMANY
Government Declares Rule on "Barred
Zone" Is Still in
Effect
Berlin, Feb. 20.-"It must be repeat-
ed again that whoever tries to pene-
trate the 'barred zone' does so at his
own risk," declared the German gov-
ernment today in discussing the state-
ments that the war upon British com-
merce had failed.
Berlin, Feb. 20.-George S. Atwood,
secretary of the American chamber of
commerce, is dead here after seven

days' illness. His funeral will be held
Wednesday, interment being held in a.
Berlin suburb.

Giuseppe De Luca has just been en-
gaged by the May Festival manage-
ment'for the big baritone role of Am-
anasro at the Saturday evening con-
cert of the Festival, when Verdi's im-
mortal opera "Aida" will be given
by an all-star cast of Metropolitan per-
formers. De Luca is an Italian of the
Amato type and has made a sensation
among New York opera-goers. For
several weeks negotiations have been
pending for his appearance at the Fes-
tival, but owing to certain important
matters which were under considera-
tion, it was impossible to close the
engagement until this time. Accord-
ingly the place was left vacant when
the announcement of the May Festival
artists was made a few day ago. The
list of artists as now completed stands
out as the greatest aggregation of
musical starsreversassembled for a
Festival in Ann Arbor or elsewhere.
The following outline of concerts
showing when the various artists are
to take part will be of interest, the
Chicago Symphony orchestra appear-
ing at all concerts except the Saturday
afternoon, which will be an organ re-
cital.
Wednesday Evening, May 2
Opening Concert
Madame Louise Homer, one of the
greatest living contraltos, whose car-:
eer as concert and operatic singer
is familiar to all, will be the soloist.
She will appear in a number of oper-
atic arias from the roles in which she
has become famous.
Thursday Evening, May 3
" The Dream of Gerontious" (Elgar)
will be rendered by the University
choral union under the baton of Dr.
Stanley with the following artists;
Christine Miller, a foremost American
contralto, whose reputation for ora-
torios is unexcelled and who has never
before been heard in Ann Arbor; Mor-
gan Kingston, tenor, whose splendid
work in the role of "Samson" last year
was such as to attract special atten-
tion; and Gustof Holmquist, bass, who
also made a profound impression at
the last M'ay Festival, will appear at
this time.
Friday Afternoon, May 4
The Children's Chorus of several
hundred voices will offer Fletcher's
"Walrus and the Carpenter," a work
which was given several years ago at
the initialsFestival in Hill auditorium.
It is one of the most satisfactory
works written for children's chorus. In
this same program Ethel Leginska, the
sensational pianist, will be heard in a
Rubenstein Concerto.
Friday Evening, May 4
Galli-Curci, the Spanish-Italian
prima-donna, will be the star. Al-
(Continued on Page Six)
BRITON CHARGED
WITH SUBSIDIZING
British Counsellor Named in Report
of U. S. District Attorney
at San Francisco
San Francisco, Feb. 20.-It is re-
ported that an indictment against An-
drew Carnegie Ross, British coun-
sellor, against the charge of subsidy
and of violating American interna-
tional relations has been brought by
United States District Attorney Pres-
ton in his report submitted this aft-
ernoon. Preston refused to confirm
or deny the report but said, "There
will be an important announcement
made by me later."

ITAllAN
FOR

BARITONE SECURED
ROLE OF AMANASRO
IN "AIDA"

GIUSEPPE DE LUCA TO
SING AT MAY FESTIVAL

Hold Exercises
In Lawluilding
C. H. Hamill, Chicago Lawyer, to
Speak at Washington's Birth-
day Celebration
Mr. Charles H. Hamill, a prominent
lawyer from Chicago, will be the prin-
cipal speaker in the exercises in ob-
servance of Washington's birthday
which will be held tomorrow fore-
noon from 10 to 12 o'clock in room B
of the law building. His subject will
be "Patriotism and International Re-
lations."
Mr. Hamill is recognized as a very
energetic and forceful speaker as well
as writer. According to Dean Henry
M. Bates of the Law school, who was
associated with him for many years
in a law office in Chicago, he is a man
of very strong convictions and is not
afraid to say what he thinks. He is
a graduate of Yale and of the law
school of Northwestern university, and
is at present a partner of the law
firm of Rosenthal and Hamill of Chi-
cago.,
Fisher's string trio has been en-
gaged to furnish music. The room will
be decorated with American flags and
portraits of Washington and other
distinguished American statesmen.
The exercises are free to all and
everybody will be welcomed. Plans
are being made to have the law stu-
dents attend in a body. The program
is as folows:
"The Stars. and Stripes Forever"..
.......................Fisher's trio
"America I Love You"...Fisher's trio
Address: "Patriotism and Interna-
tional Relations."
"America"
LITERARY COLLEGE
DROPS FORTY MEN
Place 220 Students on Probation and
172 on Warned
List
Forty men have withdrawn from the'
College of Literature, Sience, and the
Arts because of failure during the last1
semester, according to statistics com-
piled at the registrar's office. At the
same time 25 students who had left.
the college before the end of the se-
mester with poor records were marked
not to return without the permission
of the administrative board.
As the result of unsatisfactory;
grades received during the last se-
mester, 220 students have been put on
-probation and 172 on the warned list.
Six men were put on the warned list
because of the excessive unexplained
absences.
Fifty-five students who were on
warning during the semester were
taken off the list, and 42 had their
probation raised.
DR. H. H. BROOKS TO SPEAK AT
FOUNDER'S DAY CELEBRATION
Extensive preparations for the
Founder's day celebration, which will
occur at 8 o'clock Thursday evening in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall are being
made by Dr. A. M. Barrett, chairman
of the entertainment committee.
Dr. Henry Harlow Brooks, '95M, pro-
fessor of clinical medicine in the Uni-
versity and also in Bellevue hospital
medical school of New York City, will
deliver an illustrated lecture on "Med-
icine and the American Indian." Dr.
Brooks has contributed numerous ar-
ticles on medical and biological sub-
jects to the leading medical magazines
of the country.

Following the evening's program
Thursday, a reception and a dance will
be given in Barbour gymnasium for
the students of the medical school,
members of the faculty, and their
wives.
Refuse to Recognize. New Government
Washington, Feb. 20.-The United
States has refused to recognize the
revoltionary Costa Rican government.

ASKS COMMiSSIDI
FROM SRAI
NEW YORK AUTHORITY AROUS
OVER CONDITIONS IN
CITY
STARVING WOMEN CR
TO MAYOR FOR FO(
Confusion and Near Rioting Conti
in Gotham for hour in Crowde
Tenement Districts
New York, Feb. 20.-That a fed
and state food control commission
regulate the supply and distribu
of food will be necessary to prev
food riots from spreading throughb
the entire country was the declara
of the head of the weights and m
ures department, Joseph Hartig
this afternoon after he had recei
reports of the rioting going on h
"This rioting has been coming
15 days," he said, "and there'will
more of them unless federal and s
commiissions are established to re
late the distribution of goods. Th
commissions should take extraodin
ineasures. They should enforce
per capita consumption of' food1
place necessarysembargo on the s
ments of food from one state to
other or to different countries. T
should see that food is not held a
from the cities where it is most nee
and must endeavor to keep it out
the storage houses while the pe
are starving."
For nearly an hour today confus
and near rioting continued in
crowded flat districts here. ',e
streamed down the faces of womer
they ran screaming wildly from
line of police to another crying
bread.
"We are starving," they shou
"We want to see the mayor. We
American citizens and something n
be done for us."
Police tried to quiet the mob,
they became more and more fra
A United Press man who was in
crowd of reporters volunteered
services and mounted the steps of
city hall. "Go home," he yelled
Yiddish. "The mayor has promise
see you tomorrow. He is for you.
wants to do all he can for the p
pie."
"Who are you?" they asked. "W
do you represent?"
They cheered when they told 1
who he was, and after much wra
ling began to disperse.
2 AMERICANS SAVED
FROM DALBEATT
Survivors from Norwegian Steame>
Water 1 Hours When
Picked Up
London, Feb. 20.-Two Americ
were survivors of the Norweg
steamer Dalbeattie, recently sunk
shell fire from a German submar
They were much exhausted from
hours of exposure when picked up
The Norwegian embassy made
announcement today saying, "A
that was bound from Gibraltar
Glasgow laden with coal was s
Saturday. While the crew w
abandoning the steamer it went do
but the crew were all saved. '

Dalbeattie was an iron coaling stet
er of 17,337 tons.
Demand Health Certificate to Ma
Austin, Tex., Feb. 20.-The hous(
representatives today passed a bill
quiring that all male persons sl
subject themselves to a physical
amination by a physican before en
ing into a marriage contract. Lice
to marry shall not be issued to
man who is diseased.

Atwood was assigned a Berlin of-
flice in the United Press service after Big California Orange Show Opens
notice had been received here about Can Bernardino, Cal., Feb. 20.-With
the break in relations between the five million oranges under toe big
American and German governments. tents, the national orange show started
It was at that time that he wrote in here today and will continue until
the register, "remaining at my post as Feb. 28. It is expected to be the state's
ever," George S. Atwood. most pretentious mid-winter event.

Ih r

TONIGHT
Auditorium

Welcome Back a Michigan Man

General

Harry

Franck

'03

Admission

Ij

O'clock

25c

Subject-"SOUTH AMERICA" Illustrated

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