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February 20, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-20

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY A-ND COLDER
PROBABLY SNOW

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UNITED PRESS
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VOL. XXVII. No. 95. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20 1917. PRICE FVE CE'

DRHI LLS N OW HELD
IN. WATERMAN GYM
Military Work in Charge. of Competent
and Experienced Commission-
ed Officers
TRAIN EVERY WEDNESDAY.
NIGHT FROM 7 TO 9 O'CLOCK
No Experience Required to Join; Nei
Men Taken in at Each
Meeting
By L. S. T.

* * * * * * * * * *IT I*M !
*
*~ NOTICE TO MICHIGAN MEN!

*
*
*
*

Military drills for Michigan
students are being held in Wa-
terman gym every Wednesday
night from 7 to 9 o'clock.. New
men are taken' in at each drill.

*
*
*
*
*

* * * * * * * * *****'
Every Michigan student who signedt
the cards asking for a course in mil-
itary training should report at Water.
man gymnasium tomorrow night at I
o'clock. Drills under competent com-
mi sioned officers are being held there
every Wednesday night at that time.
Drilling lasts for two hours.
At the present time approximately
75 men are reporting for this work
regularly. The officers in charge of
the work are men of long experience
and capable of giving Michigan stu-
dents the most valuable kind of in-
struction. The drills have been held
since the first of the year and will con-
tinue as long as it is possible to hole'
them. More students appear at each
meeting. The gymnasium will accom-
modate several hundred and those in
charge of the work are anxious to have
the number increased.
New Men Urged to Come
Many students have not turned out
for the drills because they did no
know they were being held. It is
hoped that every one who is Intereste;
will at least investigate tomorrow
night. New recruits can be worked ir
without difficulty with those who have
had experience. In two hours' time it
:is possible to teach an inexperienced
xman to take part in company man-
oeuvers.
There is every reason why all stu-
dents who really want instruction
should take advantage of these drills
instead of waiting for the proposed
course which the government is ex
pected to install In the University. IP
is possible that no officer will be de,
tailed to give instruction at Michigan
until the coming fall. How long the
government will be forced to delay the
inspection of the University because
of the international situation is impos-
sible to say. In the mean time Mich-
igan men should take advantage of
the opportunities which a few generous
students of military experience have
offered them.
Practical Training Valuable
The practical drilling which stu-
dents can get while they are waiting
for the installation of the course wil.
be of inestimable value after they
begin the study of the science. There
is also a great deal of the scientific
wart of the work which students can
learn from the officers already avail-
able.
A leader of the work now being car-
ried on expressed himself very forc-
ibly last night with regard to the gen-
eral tone of the letters on the subject
which have been written to The Daily
in the last two or three days. "This
is no time for joking about the ques-
tion of preparedness," he said. "The
man who wiil indulge in weak levity
about our military situation is the
kind of man who jokes about a funeral
and laughs when a cripple falls in the
street."
Bring Your Gym Shoes
(Gymnasium shoes are the only equip-
vwmt required for the Wednesday night
drills. The President has given the
:use of the gymnasium without cost
and Michigan men should reward the'
unselfish efforts of the officers who are
contributing their time and services
by turning out in representative num-
bers.
It is important to remember that no
experience is necessary. New recruits
are experienced men at the end of their
first drill. Be prompt and attend every
meeting from now until the end, of

January Exports
Total $d13,441,000
Department of Commerce Reports For-
eign Commerce High Above
Previous Mark
Washington, Feb. 19.-American ex-
ports in January amounted to $613,-
441,000, high above previous records,
according to a statement issued today
by the department of commerce. High-
er prices rather than increased vol-
ume is responsible, theireport said.
Imports for January are reported at
$241,674,000, an increase of more than
$35,000,000 over December. Total ex-
ports of the year ending January 31,;
1917, were $5,764,828,000 as compared2
with $3,616,827,000 the year before, the
report showed.
In January, 1917, gold imports to-t
taled $58,000,000 against $15,000,000 inI
January, 1916. Exports of gold last
month totaled $20,000,000, an increase3
of about $10,000,000 over January a
year ago.
WAR MAKES JAPAN -
U. S. MORE FRIENDLY
Nippon Envoy Thinks Great War Aids
Mutual Feeling; Immigra-
tion Set Aside
. Washington, Feb. 19.-Relations be-
tween the United States and Japanr
are more friendly, but this is rather,
due to war-created conditions and not
to any recent developments in the im-
migration situation, the Japanese Am-
bassador declared today. There has,
been no recent change in diplomatic
channels, he said, to effect the immi-
.ration question.
The European war has increased the
friendly feeling between the two coun-
tries, and the immigration discussion
has been, at least temporarily, set
aside. The recent stand of the United
States against Germany's submarine
warfare has cemented this friendship.
Further reasons assigned by the
Japanese envoy for the friendly rela-
tions are the developing of commerce
between the two countries since the
wa started, and attempted co-ordin-
ation of efforts in the development of
China.
WILL PROSECUTE
NEWSPAPER TRUST
Department of Justice to Continue
Grand Jury Proceedings Against
Manufacturers
Washington, Feb. 19.-The depart-
ment of justice will not drop its grand
jury proceedings against newspaper
manufacturers for alleged violations
of the anti-trust law, even though the
manufacturers have agreed to arbi-
trate the questions of the price and
distribution of paper, it was learned
today. The department of justice of-
ficially said that if there had been
violations by newspaper print manu-
facturers the fact that the manufac-
turers had agreed to submit to arbi-
tration by the federal trade commis-
sion does not lessen the offense.
The department said that if indict-
ments are returned,, the department
would have to prosecute.
SENIOR GIRLS TO ENTERTAIN
SOPHOMORE WOMEN FEB. 22
The women of the senior class will
entertain their sophomore sisters at
a Washington's birthday party from 3

to 5 o'clock on Thursday, February
22, at Newberry hall. Games and
stunts in keeping with the holiday
will provide entertainment for those
who attend.
This is the first time that the sopho-
mores have been entertained by their
sister class and written invitations
have been sent out to the younger
girls.
Regent Beal Entertains Foreigners
Members of the Cosmopolitan club
were entertained last evening at the
home of Regent Junius E. Beal. A
program of talks and stunts was pre-
sented by members of the club. Regent
Lucius L. Hubbard of Houghton was
present at the meeting.
Asquith's Son Wounded Second Time
London, Feb. 19.-Liehut.Com. Ar-
thur M. Asquith, third son of the for-
mer premier, has been wounded for
the second time since the war began.

100,000 SPIES IN
USSYSSENATO
Overman Makes Startling Statement
in Debate on Espionage
Bill
"TREATS ALL AMERICANS AS
SPIE S"-SENATOR CUMMINS
Borah Thinks Proper Use of Laws
Can Beat Out High Liv-
ng Cost
Washington, Feb. 19.-There are
100,000 spies in the United States,
Senator Lee Overman declared on the
senate floor during the debate on the
espionage bill for protection against
the operation of spies and malefactors
in time of war. Overman, who, as a
member of the judicial committee in
charge of the bill, has been n close
touch with the department of justicc,
fostered the measure.
Determined filibustering against the
bill was threatened on the senate floor
by Senator Cummins, who objected to
certain phrases. Passage of the ad-
ministration's proposition, Cummins
declared, would put the United States
under virtual military law in times of
peace as well as war, "an autocratic
and dangerous assumption of power by
the executive." He said it treated
every American citizen as a spy.
Washington, Feb. 19.-Charging the
department of justice had been
derelict in the administration of the
laws affecting food prices, Senator
Borah on the senate floor today sug-
gested that the attorney general rec-
ommend additional legislation if such
was necessary. Borah said he was
"convinced that proper administration
of existing laws would bring down the
cost of living."
Borah cited the recent victory of
the federal trade commission in its
fight against newspaper print manu-
facturers as an evidence of "the
potentialities of existing legislation."
The department of justice, Borah said,
had readily enough prepared supple-
mentary legislation to enforce espion-
age laws which the administration was
so anxious to obtain.
The house today refused to give the
federal trade commission the $400,000
a'propriation which had been estimated
as the cost of a food investigation
such as had been ordered by Presi-
dent Wilson. Provision for the $400,-.
000 was made in a bill by Representa-
tive Boyland of Missouri, providing
for an investigation, which was strick-
en from the unanimously consent cal-
endar on objection by Senator Mann
of Illinois, and Representative Aus-
tin of Tennessee. The appropriation
committee previously had refused to
put the $400,000 in the sundry civil
bill.
S. A iL. TO IVE CELEBRATON
ON WASING'WN'S IRT1)NY
Hon. Fred G. Dewey, '02, member of
the Detroit Bar association, will be
the principal speaker at the Washing-
ton birthday celebration to be held at
the Ann Arbor high school auditorium
Thursday evening. The lecture will be
given under the auspices of the Sons of
the American Revolution and the pro-
ceeds will be used for the benefit of
the Old Ladies Home of this city. Mr.
Tewey will speak on the subject,
"Washington's Message to 1917."
Prof. George W. Patterson of the
engineering department, will preside

at the occasion, while a series of pic-
tures illustrating the life of Wash-
ington will be shown by G. R. Swain
of the latin department. W. S. West-
erman. '17, leader of the Freshman
Glee club, will conduct the musical
program and will offer songs appro-
priate to the occassion. Tickets for the
entertainment are on sale at the vari-
ous State street stores.

35,ooo Gross Tons Sunk by
Single German Submarine,
Berlin, Feb. 19.-One German submarine up to Feb. 15, had reported
sinking a total of 35,000 gross tons, the press bureau announced today.
"Among vessels sunk the announcement said, "which have not been
mentioned in press dispatches, were the British Gravina, 1,140 tons,
carrying fruit; the Italian sailing ship, Maria, 1,080 tons, with coffee
for London; the Swedish sailing ship, Hugo Hamilton, 2,500 tons, with
saltpeter. Eighteen prisoners were taken, among whom were four
captains."
DISCUSSES ALLIANCES WOMEN TO HOLD ANNUAL
Of NATIONS AND PEACE' COTILLION FEBRUARY 23
i P
DR, AkED SAYS MACHINERY OF BUT 300 TICKETS TO BE GIVEN
WAR EXISTS ON OUT; FOLLOWS ATHLETIC
EARTH BANQUET
Dr. Charles E. Aked Sunday night The annual cotillion of the depart-
held a capacity audience at the First ment of physical education for women
Presbyterian church spellbound by will take place Friday evening of this
his eloquence for more than an hour week at Barbour gymnasium. All uni-
in his talk on the subject of "America versity girls are invited and may se-
and the World State; After the War cure tickets at the director's office. No
-What?" more than 300 will be given out and

The present war from viewpoints
not commonly presented to the public
constituted the main body of his dis-

course. He showed the sentiments of
the warring nations which have led
up to the conflict now raging on the
European continent, and what the pos-
sibilities are for more and bloodier
wars after this one has terminated.
"The machinery of war exists on
the earth; the machinery of peace is
unknown," was the gist of Doctor
Aked's lecture. In convincing man-
ner he told of the manner in which
alliances are entsred into between na-
tions, how these. alliances lead to
counter alliances, and how ultimately
the mutual fear of nation. against na-
tion culminates in a bloody, disastrous
destruction of human life and happi-
ness.
As a start toward the accomplish-
ment of a permanent peace Doctor
Aked advocated the idea of a league
of nations to enforce peace, which
might finally lead to an international
police system to enforce the decrees
of an international court for the set-
tlement of disputes, but which must
at best have an humble inception and
a gradual growth.
GUARD' TO RETURN
Funston Divides Solders Into Two
Contingents for Trip Home
San Antonio, Feb. 19.-The entire
national guard now in the field has
been divided into two contingents for
departure from the border, General
Funston announced today. The first
contingent will depart "without de-
lay." It is planned to dispatch each
group at an interval of about a week.
STONE SAYS NO ACTION WILL
BE TAKEN TO RATIFY TREATY
Washington, Feb. 19.-Despite re-
ceipt of a note from President Wilson
urging an immediate ratification of
the Colombian treaty, Senator Stone
of the foreign relations committee in-
timated today that nothing further
would be done at the present session

I

a large number have already been
called for.
There will be several dances beside
the cotillon, which Miss Alice Evans
head of the department, will lead. The
decorations and favors will probably
be reminders of Washington's birth-
day, although their exact nature is
being kept a mystery, Girls are re-
quested to wear simple white dresses
if possible and to remain the whole
evening, in order to make the figures
complete.
Spectator's tickets may be had by
application to Miss Evans, but cotil-
lion tickets will be given to out-of-
town guests only in the event that
they are not all called for by Univer-
sity girls.'
Tne party will be preceded by the
second annual athletic banquet, 'tick-
ets for which can be purchased at the
office of Dean Myra B. Jordan or from
any member of the athletic committee.
DR. H. H. CUMMINGS TALKS ON
TUBERCULOSIS THIS EVENING
The first lecture this semester under
the auspices of the University health
representatives will be given by Dr.
H. H. Cummings of the health service,
who will talk' on "Tuberculosis" at
7:30 o'clock tonight in the natural
science auditorium.
The address will be illustrated with
slides made by the Lansing board of
health and will deal with the first
symptoms of the disease, how it is con-
tracted, and its treatment in the mod-
ern hospitals.
This lecture is one of the many talks
to be given by medical men on topics
dealing with the preservations of
health. Thy representatives plan to
meet again two weeks from tonight.
Y. M. C. A. BOOK EXCHANGE
ESTABLISHES I{EW RECORD
The "Y" book exchange closed Satur-
day night after being open for two and a
half weeks. During this period the
bureau sold oveL $300 worth of books.

ANNUAO HGHA
ENGINEERING WR
STARTS WITH RUSH.
ATTEDANCE OF COURSE SUe
PASSES THAT OF LAST
YEAR
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS
ADDRESSES VISITORS
Program for Session Consists of Lee-.
tures on Road Building and
Materials
The third annual short course in
highway engineering opened with a
rush yesterday with an attendance
surpassing even that of last year.
This course is given every year un-
der the direction of the department of
highway engineering and in co-opera-
tion with the Michigan state highway
department. This year the dates are
from Feb. 19 to 23, inclusive. The pur-
pose of the course is to aid in sup-
plying that information to highway
commissioners and highway engineers
relating to the construction and main-
tenance of country roads that is so
much in demand and is so difficult t
get. Admission to the course is free
to all road engineers or commissioners
and to all others who are interested.
President Welcomes Visitors.
The first meeting was at 11 o'clock
yesterday, when President H. B
Hutchins welcomed the visitors. Dur-
ing the afternoon the following papers
were read: "The Viewpoint of the
State Grange Toward the Improve-
ment of Country Roads in Michigan,'
by John Ketcham, master of the
State Grange; "'The Viewpoint of the
Automobile Manufacturer Toward the
Improvement of Country Roads in
Michigan," by A. F. Bement, secretar
of the Lincoln Highway association;
"The Progress Made in Road Improve-
ment in Michigan During 1916," by
Frank P. Rogers, state highway com-
missioner of Michigan. 'The lecture
in the evening was by J. H. Pratt
state geologist and engineer of Nortt
Carolina, who spoke on the subject
"The Relation of Geology to the Con-
struction and Maintenance of Coun-
try Roads."
Program for Today's Session.
Today's program for the course fol-
lows:
9 o'clock-"The Construction of Con
crete Roads in Oakland County," b
Martin DeGlopper.
10 o'clock-"Some Points of Inter
est above Concrete Roads," by Georg
A. Dingman.
11 o'clock-"The Progress Made i
Berrien County During 1916 Wit
Bituminous Surface Roads," by W. .
Cleary.
1:30 o'clock-"Houghton County'
Experience with Bituminous Surfac
Roads," by Randolph Martin.
2:15 o'clock-"Macomb County's Ex
perience with Bituminous Construe
tion and Bituminous Surface Treat
ment," by Walter J. Lehner.
3 o'clock-Recess.
3:30 o'clock-"The Experience o
Cuyhoga County with Brick Roads,
by D. Moomaw.
8 o'clock-Smoker and informal get
together. Speakers: H. S., Earle,
F. Rogers, and others.
All of the lectures are held in roo
348 of the engineering building an
the laboratory work is in the hig

way engineering laboratory. All me
taking the course registered in roon
347 of the engineering building an
all mail and telegrams for them shoul
be -addressed to this room.
NAVY DEPARTMENT CALLS OFF
CONTRACT WITH ENGLISH C(
Washington, Feb. 19.-Virtual form
al announcement that the navy depart
menmt has called off the the $3,000,00
shell contract it had accepted fron
Hadfield's, an English concern, w
made today when it was announce
* that $2,100,000 of the order had bee
awarded to the Washington Steel an
Ordnance Co.

This is a better record than any pre-
vious exchange, and the "Y" has de-

to comply with the president's request..
Medical Fraternity Gets New Home
Phi Chi, medical fraternity, last
week purchased a new home situated
on the corner of Geddes and Washte-
naw streets, the residence formerly
owned by Mr. W. D. Harriman. Plans
have been made for the remodeling
and refurnishing of the home in order
that the organization will be able to
move into its new residence some time
in June.

INDEPENDENT GIRL'S DANCE
Saturday Night, Feb. 24
BARBOUR GYMNASIUM
Tickets on sale by the Exteutive Board or at Watr's
Book Store.

cided to continue the work at the be-
ginning of every semester as a per-
menant fixture.
There are a number of books still
left. Those having books or money
in the possession of the "Y" can re-
ceive them by calling Saturday, Feb.
24. No books will-be given up unless
the owner brings his receipt.
CANADIAN WHEAT CROP TURNS
OUT BETTER THAN EXPECTED
Ottawa, Ont., Feb. 19.-The western
wheat crop has turned out far better
than expected, the crop having proved
to be 225,000,000 bushels as against an
estimate of 175,000,000 bushels, at an
average price of $1.50 per bushel. This
means $75,000,000 for western Canadi-
an farmers more than was expected.
Law Grades Sent Out for Delivery
The semester marks for the senio
law class were sent out from the offic
last evening and will be delivered in
this morning's mail.

r
e

Attempt to Secure Rooms for VTsito
Ann Arbor landladies, who have v
cant rooms, are requested to call t
Michigan Union between 9 and
o'clock this morning in order that mi
attending the short course in highw
engineering may find suitable acco
modations.

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