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February 15, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:a

.4 £ll.JC11 1 Z'411L i I1.1°

The Cadet

RUSH TO PUT INDUSTRIES
IOf U.SON WAR FOOTING

6A R RI C K Fe 12
DETROIT
ROBERT MANTELL
in Shakesperian roles

WWI

TI
Classic
' ~ing lin,

he Cadet is a Walk-Over
c- a model with strik-
es that is as comfortable
as a "broad shape" on

SEVEN
TO

COMMITTEES APPOINTED
MOBILIZE PLANTS TO
SERVE NATION

most feet.

The price of

leather continues to
advance rapidly - better
get fitted soon-our pre-
sent prices range from $6
to $7.

Walk-Over Shoe Store
115 S. MAIN

5

-

E NIORS
Sit Early For Your -MICHIGANENSIAN"
PICYTURE AT
MAIN STUDIOS
1546-48 Broadway New York, N.Y
Perfect Portraitures
Unsurpassed Accomodations for
Group Photographs.
Amateur Work Handlod in a Pro-
fessional Way.
619 E. Liberty St. PHONE 948-W

_...__

Big Reduction
n All Medium Weight Suitings
A large variety of patterns plus our
tailoring ability insures you satisfaction
118 E. Huron
V A RDCO. Phone 244-R
Gleaning, Pressing and Repairing

one

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Y1ack & Co.
(Established 1857)
Official
Laboratory Coats
and
Walter's
Uniforms

*:
*
*
*:

CLASS NOTICES

Lectures in Zoology 24 will be
given in Room F-214 N. S., in-
stead of in the natural science au-
ditorium. The seating list is post-
on the bulletin board near this
room.

*
*
*
*
*
*
*

* R, W. HEGNER.
* * * * * * * * * * * *

City News

At Lowest Prices

's Furnishing Section
(First Floor-Left)

WHAT'S GOING ON
Today.
2 o'clock-February number of
mnus on sale.
to 6 o'clock-Y. W. C. A. enter-
s for entering juniors at New-
ry hall.
o'clock-Cast rehearsal for Mimes'
ol's Paradise" at the Union.
o'clock-Mr. Lyman Bryson talks
"The Influence of the Press in In-
iational Relations" in U-Hall.
o'clock-Classical club meets in
m A Alumni Memorial hall.
o'clock-Menorah study circle
ts in room P-162 natural science
ding. ,
U-Notices.
Wting of all track managers at
'clock in the trophy room of the
erman gymnasium. Track man-
rs who cannot attend in person
requested to send substitutes.
he Craftsmen club of the Univer-
will hold its regular meeting at
D o'clock Saturday evening at the
onic temple.
ay only $1.00 for your double-disc
ce records and save many quarters.
ruary records now on sale. All-
.dinger's Music Shop. 122 E. Lib-
r St. tf

A night school for foreigners was
proposed at a meeting of the board
of education of the city held Tuesday
night. This matter has been up for
consideration before the board once
before, but definite action was not
taken at that time.
Sarah Caswell Angell chapter of the
Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion will meet this afternoon at the Pi
Beta Phi house, Tappan road.
The city Y. M. C. A. has launched
a campaign for funds to construct a
swimming pool for its members.
An automobile driven by James R.
McLaren struck Miss Mabel Clement
this morning, the latter suffering
severe bruises and lacerations about
the face. Neither party was to blame
for the occurrence, according to wit-
nesses.
Birkett Newkirk, spec., left this
morning for Jacksonville, Fla., where
he will - spend the remainder of the
winter with his mother.
REV. J. M. WELLS TO DELIVER
ILLUSTRATED LECTURE TONIGHT
"California and the Exposition"
will be the subject of a stereoptican
lecture to be given by Rev. John Ma-
son Wells at 8 o'clock this evening, in
the Baptist church. The 'ctures will
include scenes from the Rocky Moun-
tains, Grapid Canyon, Los Angeles, or-
ange groves of the West, the mis-
sions, petrified forests as well as an
extensive series from the Panama ex-
position.
Admission to the lecture will be 15
cents for adults, two for 25 cents, and
children 10 cents. The proceeds from
the lecture will go to -the Sunday
school of the Baptist church.

Washington, D. C., Feb. 14.-(Spec-
ial.)--Seven committees to have charge
of the seven principal branches of
American industrial resources were
named today by the council of national
defense in furtherance of the plan to
prepare the industrial resources of
the United States for war.
The chairman of each of these com-
mittees is a member. of the advisory
committee of the council. Each chair-
man will choose his own assistants
and each will work out the particular
problems of his own branch of the
preparedness movement.
The plans of the councilof national
defense are now well under way. The
meetings which started yesterday will
continue until every large problem
that is before the committee has been
solved. After this the chairman of the
committees will continue to work out
the details, it being the intention to
perfect all the plans to such a minute
detail that all the factories in the Unit-
ed States which are needed for muni-
tions will become munitions factories
an hour after a declaration of war.
German System Cited
At today's meeting Brig. Gen. Joseph
E. Kuhn, president of the army war
college, outlined his experiences as
military observer with the German-
army in the present war. Gen. Kuhn
has had an unusual opportunity to
observe the manner in which the Ger-
man government makes war and he
laid particular stress in his address
to the council on those features of
Germandactivities which had to do
with industrial preparedness.
Daniel Willard, president of the B.
and 0. railroad, and a members of the
advisory committee, reported that the
railroads of the country had agreed on
a plan of preparingthe transportation
resources of the country by which the
railroads will co-operate closely with
the four departments of the army in
transportating troops and supplies in
time of war.
Seek to Standardize Drugs
The committee on standardization of
medical and surgical supplies and
equipment reported to the council to-
day that it soon would call into con-
ference a number of manufacturers of
drugs, instruments, hospital supplies,
etc., for the purpose of standardizing
the articles necessary to the medical
department in time of war.
It is expected that such action will
decrease the cost of such articles and
also will make certain of their rapid
production if war comes.
FRAU FASHION FRAMES FADS
FOR FOOLISH FAT FELLOW
Sausage-skins Jeans 'Edict of Dame
Fashion for Sprightly Ones;
Shoulder Pads Feature
Philadelphia, Feb. 14.-At the first
day's session of the annual conven-
tion of the National Association of
Merchant Tailors today, many prob-
lems were discussed by the 400 dele-
gates.
The main points brought out of but-
tonholing of the dictators of styles in
men's clothes by the satellites of less
fame were the condemnation of the
Prince Albert coat and the general
plan to narrow the legs of trousers.
To the first edict the tailors said they
expected little objection, as the fash-
ion in coats has been drifting steadily
to the sack variety for several years.
The tightening of trouser legs they
fear will meet with serious objection,
especially on the part of their stout
customers. The extremely narrow
cut proposed, it was said by a prom-
inent delegate, will compel some up-
to-the-minute dressers to have them-
solves literally poured into the cov-

erning of their neither extremities.
Blue pique evening dress vests con-
stitute another innovation the lords
of the yardstick and scissors will at-
tempt to get past the censor. Black
vests for evening wear no longer will
be tolerated. Lapels of coats will be
narrower and vests will be cut much
lower. Much padding of the shoulders
is anticipated.
DETROIT AUTO CLUB OFFERS
EQUIPMENT TO GOVERNMENT
Detroit, Feb. 14.-The Detroit Auto-
mobile club has wired President Wil-
son offering its entire membership
and equipment of motor cars as vol-;
unteers for the motor corps in case
of war. The telegram was signed by
the president, authorized by over 1,000+
members, all of whom will turn over
their cars to the government should
war be declared.

we mnake hats
We sell hats at retail
We carry a big stock
We have the latest all the tinie
We shape hats to fit the head
We clean and reblock hats

What we.
c''do to Hats =

ARCADE
Show at 3:oo; 6:30; S:oo; 9:30
ioc Unless Otherwise Specified.
Phone z96-M.
Tue.-i3-Clara Kimball Young in "The
Foolish Virgin." 2sc.
Wed,-14-Robert Warwick in "The
Man Who Forgot"; Comedy.
Thu.-15-George Walsh in "The Island
of Desire"; Chap i6, "Gloria's Ro-
mance," ("A Modern Pirate.") ise.
Fri.-16-Harold Lockwood and May
Allison in "Pidgin Island"; Drew
Comedy. i5c.

Orpheum Theatre
Matinees, 2: 0-3:30; Evening, 6:45,
9:15, 9:30.
Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Thirs.-Fri.-iS-z6-Lou Tellegen in
"The Victoria Cross." Also Bray
Cartoons.
Sat.-17-Wm. Desmond and Clara Wil-
liams in "The Criminal." Also Tri-
angle Comedy. Evening, 15c.
Sun.-Mon.-x 8-19-Frank McIntyre of Ann
Arbor, in "The Traveling Salesman."
Also Holmes Travels. Evening, i5c.
Tues.-20-Mae Marsh in "The Whart
Rat." Also Triangle Comedy. Even-
ing, 5-c.

i

Semester

FACTORY HAT STORE
61 Packard Next to the Delta
Cor. Packard and State
HARVARD ALUMNUS
ATTACKS U. S. STAND
Dr. Edmund von Mach States Amer-
lea Inconsistent in Ger-
man Relations
In a bitter letter addressed to the
citizens of the United States, Dr.
Edmund von Mach of Cambridge, an
American citizen and a graduate of
Harvard, attacks the policy of the
government in breaking off diplomatic
relations with Germany as being in-
consistent and unsportsmanlike. He
attacks the national defense program
of congress as a program of defense
for office holders and a useless
squandering of the people's money.
The letter closes by warning the citi-
zens to read once more the constitu-
tion, and to use all his facilities in
preventing the formation of an
autocracy.
Dr. von Mach states that both the
English order of Nov. 2, 1914, and the
German order of Jan. 31, 1917, were
in wanton disregard of our rights, but
both should receive the same treat-
ment. He says that he has been at-
tempting for the last year to send
milk to the babies of Germany, but
has been prevented by the president,
and he claims that the United States
would probably adopt the same mode
of warfare if she found herselfin the
same predicament that Germany is in.
He asks every American citizen to do
all in his power to prevent war with
Germany and the formation of an
autocracy in which one man can say,
"Now you must go to war."
ILLINOIS SENATE COMMITTEE
REPUDIATE DEATH PENALTY
Springfield, Ill., Feb. 14.-The sen-
ate judiciary committee reported fa-
vorably on the three bills for the
abolition of capital punishment in Il-
linois by a vote of 6 to 5.
There is now a prospect that the
bills may be passed by the senate and
will get through the house. They
provide that the penalty for murder,
treason and kidnapping be changed
from death to life imprisonment.
Plan Military Courses for Chicago
Chicago, Feb. 14.-The University
of Chicago will be a protential West
Point when military training courses
which were announced today are put
into operation. Major Bell of the U.
S. calvary, who has been designated
by the war department to take charge
of the university military training
courses, spent practically the entire
day in conference with President
Judson, working out the details.
Robbers Loot Los Angeles Bank
Los Angeles, Feb. 14.-Robbers held
up the cashier and bookkeeper of the
West Home Savings bank this after-
noon and escaped with $2,500. . Police
and sheriff are on the trail.
Get your shoes fixed at Paul's Place,
$11 E. William St. 5tf
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. tf

'I

CHARLES FROHMAN

Presents

JULIA SANDERSON

DONALD BRIAN

SHEEHAN

for the

I

I

Second

&

JOSEPH CAWTHORN

CO.

IN THE TRIUMPHANT
MUSICAL COMEDY

"SYBIL"

I

PRICES 50C to $2.00

SEATS NOW ON SALE

Text Books

U

DEFICIT OF 295 MILLIONS
IN NEW REVENUE ENACTMENT
Senate Committee Forecasts Deficit
of Nearly Million
More
Washington, Feb. 14.-A treasury
deficit of $333,400,000 at the end of
the next fiscal year is forecast in a
report submitted by the senate finance
committee, recommending that the
administration revenue bill be amend-
ed to authorize a bond issue of $195,-
256,000 instead of $100,000,000, and
that the authorization for certificates
of indebtedness be made $500,000,000
instead of $300,000,000.
The recommendation for increases
is based on revised treasury depart-
ment estimates submitted to congress
since the bill passed the house, plac-
ing the federal government's expend-
itures for the fiscal year 1918 at $1,-
400,000,000. The committee estimates
that to meet this total and provide a
working balance the amount . which
must be raised by bonds and new rev-
enue legislation is $433,400,000. This
the committee proposes to raise as
follows:
By bond .issues: For expenditures
on account of Mexican situation to
June 30, 1917, $162,418,000; for con-
struction of Alaskan railway to June
30, 1918, $21,838,000; for construction
of armor plate plant, $11,000,000;
making a total bond issue of $195,-
266,000.
By new taxation: An excess profits
tax, $226,000,000; inheritance tax in-
creases, $22,000,000 making a total of
$248,000,000, and a grand total from
new taxes and bonds of $443,256,000,
or $9,856,000 in excess of absolute
needs.
The bill probably will be brought
up in the senate Friday.
NICARAGUAN GOVERNMENT
PLANS LARGE UNIVERSITY
With an endowment of 2,500,000
acres of land and liberal financial
backing, the Nicaraguan government
has commenced the institution of a
national university under the personal
direction and control of Dr. C. A.
Burgheim, American consul-general.
The university will be composed of
five colleges, and is to be modeled
after the average American univer-
sity type.

GRAIN EXCHANGE SHOWS SLUMP
Elevators Unable to Ship Due to Em-
bargo
Chicago, Feb. 14.-The announce-
jnent of the closing down of five ele-
vators having a capacity of 7,000,000
bushels, by the J. Rosenbaum Grain
company here shortly before noon,
caused a sharp break in all grains on
the grain exchange. May wheat
dropped two cents, July three cents,
and September two and one-half
cents. Corn and oats also tumbled.
Along with the announcement of
Rosenbaum came the news that half
a dozen other elevators would close.
They were filled with grain and can-
not ship. The Wabash railroad joined
other eastern lines and placed an em-
bargo on all grain shipments to Chi-
cago and east this morning. Traffic
conditions were characterized as "rot-
ten" by grain men. Cars cannot be
secured at any price. A complete de-
moralization of the grain market will
follow, they assert, unless relief is
forthcoming. The German submarine
embargo is blamed.
NAVY COMMISSION URGES
WESTERN SUBMARINE BASES
Washington, Feb. 14.-Establish-
ment of a submarine training base in
Los Angeles harbor and of a subma-
rine war operating base at San Diego
is recommended in a report of the
special navy commission, headed by
Rear Admiral Helm, made public to-
day by the navy department.
Montreal Contributes to National Fund
Montreal, Que., Feb. 14.-The board
of control this morning decided to
make a grant of $1,000,000 to the na-
tional patriotic fund. This is double
the amount given to the fund last year
and practically assures that the
amount of $2,500,000 aimed at as Mon-
treal's share will be largely exceeded.
K. of P. Students' Notice
All K. of P. students are asked to
call on Roy P. Henry, P. C.., Nickels
Arcade, or Mark Sudgen, C. C., State
St. druggist, at earliest convenience.
IMPORTANT. 15-16-17
Log Log Slide Rules $7.50 at Wahr's
University Bookstore. 13-18inel

I

'I

WHITNEY THEATRE
FRIDAY, FEBRUA~RY 16

Senio Lits

Senior L s.
We Are Taking Orders for Canes
606 E. Liberty

1

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