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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 15, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EXHIBIT

V IN %.ALIN %Y V V

Spring and Summer Suitings
American and Foreign Sources in Artistic and Striking Designs
YOUR INSPECTION INVITED

Official newspaper at the University of
Mi'igan. Published every morning except
Mnday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $2.50; b mail, ..
Want ad. stations: uarr ;Students up
Vl Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 96;o;editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7 :30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager

G. H. Wild Company

Og Merchant Tailors

STATE STREET

University
TX T BO OK S
New nd 80ondha~nd
he Slater Book Shop

"Y" Book
Exchange
open daily.
Put your
books on
sale at your
own price.
Excellent
bargains may
be had.

g iit ll iiilytll l il iill ill i li gifini ai i giili uli iill niill a1111ii
MICHIGAN STUDENTI
We have what you want and the kind of service
Text Book
Loose Leaf Note Books-Lab Outfits, Apron.
Tools, etc., etc.
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTOR
' f iilillll ll tt lll llttlltltl l tt111tflltlll ltlllitllllllltlltllill111

s, Shop

a

you desire.

S

ES

STOP AT
UTT LE'S
338 S. STATE
o sodas and lunches
EORGE BISCH OFF
~LOR IST
ice Cut dowers and Plants
hapin St. Ann Arbor, Mich.
PHONE 809 M

Rowe City Laundry
406 Detroit St
Cash cards save you money
PHONE 457-M
FIRST NATL BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $roo,ooo Surplus and Profit $65,ooo
DIRECTORS

Wirt Cornwell
Geo. W. Patterson
S. W. Clarkson
Fred Schmid

Waldo M. Abbott
Harry M. Hawley
Harrison Soule
D. B. Sutton

E. D. Kinnie

'e Carry a Large Assortment of Candies

'ii

We can Satisfy Your Taste,
A TRIAL WILL CONVINCE YOU

The Fountain of Youth
State Street Cor. Liberty

We Offer You
URITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION
Resources $3,8oo,ooo
in Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
in Office--
orthwest Corner Main and Huron
ich Office--
707 North University Ave.
ormerS & MechanicS Bank
f'ers the Best in Modern Banking
ECURITY - - - EFFICIENCY;
ent and Pleasant quarters. You Will
sed With Our ServiCe. Two Offices
i S. Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
1

1

SUGAR BOWL

109 S. Main St.

SPECIAL SUNDAES
LIGHT LUNCHES
Our candies are made in
our own sanitary shop.

a typewriter from
D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
ill furnish- you an instruction
free of charge. You will be a
before you know it.
Women,

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Betwee Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on atern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
m., 8:o a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. m., 9:10
p. M.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-:4 a. e and
every two hours to 6:48 p. m.; to Lansing,
8:43 p. .
Jackson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)- 9:48 a. m. and every two hours
to :48 p. m.
Local Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m., 6:40 a
m., 7 :5 a. m. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
VP 8:0e p m., 9:05 p. M., 10:50 p. M. to
Ypslaui only, 9:20 a. m., 9:5o. a. i., 2:05 p
i., 6:0jp i., 11:45 p. m., i :o a. m., 1,2L
a. r.1T0o Salne, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6:o a. m., 7:5 a
m., 10:20 . i.. 12:20 a. i.
i Takes Pictures
S N Develops films
makes Prints
W1 -
71 E. VNVE R-r
The Unversity of Chicago
OMEin addition to resident
work offers also ins nc-
t o r detztj e n-e
STUDY frryeriaforinai addres
24th Year U.ofC.(DivH),Chicao,. s
dren" is the subject of a lecture to be
given in Ionia tomorrow night by
Prof. R. W. Bunting.
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister will give a'
reading of "The Rivals" tomorrow
night at Fowlerville.
'intercoftegfate
After a number of years' of unsatis-
factory operation, the honor-point sys-
tem such as in vogue here, has been
discarded by Leland Stanford, Jr., Un-
iversity.
Women at the University of Wash-
ington have been formed into Red
Cross classes and will go into im-
mediate training for use in event of
war. Several first-aid courses for
both men and women also have been
inaugurated.
Columbia will open its spring base-
ball season on the Polo grounds with
the New York Giants, on April 10.
Athletic authorities at West Point
have granted, permission to engage
one game with a middle-western uni-
versity team each year. Until the
present time, but one game away from
home was allowed the cadets,--that
with the middies at Annapolis.
[o HOLD MEETING TO URGE
PASSAGE OF TRAINING BILL.
For the purpose of awakening senti-
ment favorable to the Chamberlair
bill for universal military training
now on the senate calendar, the Anr
Arbor branch of the National Security
league has called a meeting to be heW
the night of Feb. 20 in the city Y. M
C. A. Dean Mortimer E. Cooley o
the engineering college, Dean Victm
C. Vaughan of the Medical school
Gardner C. Williams, and Prof. W. H
Hobbs, chairman of the local organiza
tion, are on the program.

Conrad N. Church.............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn---------------City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald..........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson..............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade.........Statistical dito
J E. Camp bell .. 4ssistan Business Manager
C. Philip Emery.. Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horne..Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau...Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter...Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
J. L. Stadeker E. L. Zeigler
C. M. tickling H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney L. W. Nieter
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumgarth
Reporters
H. C. Garrison C. L. Roeser
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood
R. H. Fricken G. O. Brophb
B. I. Millar F. A. Taber
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood J. C. Martin
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
Business Staff
Bernard Woh J. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Lois
Harold. Makinson Earl F. Ganscho
Walter R. Payne ackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smith, Seymour B. Wilson
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1917.
Night Editor-D. S. Rood.
WHAT ARE WE GOING TO DO?
What is the University of Michigan
going to do to help the nation in the
present crisis? Are we going to sit
idly by and watch students in other
universities take steps to prepare
themselves for the impending conflict?
Michigan has no system of compulsory
military training, but the Regents and
faculty have provided for a modified
course of instruction in military sci-
ence. At other universities where a
volunteer system is in vogue, the stu-
dents have organized to fit themselves
for war. Princeton is forming a vol-
unteer battalion, and at both Yale and
Harvard units of the Reserve Officers
Training Corps are being organized.
How about Michigan?
In the news columns of The Daily
yesterday, it was announced that an
army officer had been detailed by the
war department to act as instructor
in military science at the University.
It was also stated that only 140 had
thus far enrolled in the course-hard-
ly enough to form one company of in-
fantry. Of the male students in the
University, there must be 2,000 who
are physically fit for service, and have
the time to devote to training. One-
fifteenth of that number have enrolled.
Think it over carefully-and then sign
uip.
Still happy? Or have you received
your marks?
,It is reported that the Inlander is
about to break off diplomatic relations
with the Gargoyle.-Adv.
"Carranza Moves to End European
War"-Headline. What a lot of sar-
castic things we could say about such
information.
Thomas Edison was entertained on
his seventieth birthday by 1500 of his
employees. Maybe they thought he
would invent a way to raise their
wages.
The Law school is going to make its
students explain their absences. We
always thought that a lawyer could
explain anything.
FRESliHN N GIRLS TO GIVE
PARTY FOR JUNIOR ADVISORS
Exchange of hospitalities will be
made for the first time when the
freshmen girls entertain their junior
advisors at a Valentine party at 230
o'clock Saturday afternoon in Bar-
bour gym. The main feature of the
afternoon will be a skit, after which
there will be dancing and refresh-

ments.
The committee in charge of the en-
tertainment is Ruth Jennings, general
chairman; Louise Boynton, Eleanor
Shartel, Lucy Hoffman, and Ruth
Jameson.
Ilenorah Study Circle Meets Tonight
Those members of the Michigan
Menorah society who are interested
in its study circle recently organized
will meet ot 8 o'clock tonight in room
P162 of the natural science building.
Actual work will be done at this time
tid all who come are urged to bring
note books.

Prof. W. T. Fishleigh of the depart-
ment of automobile engineering as-
sisted by Mr. W. E. Lay of the same
department, will give a short, course
in automobile engineering, different
from any previous course, during 1917
summer session. The short course is
to include instruction in gasoline au-
tomobile, automobile engine theory
and design, chassis theory and design,
and automobile testing.
The idea of the course is to give men
engaged in automobile construction an
opportunity to get hold of some of the
theory during the summer months
when construction is slack.
Arrangements have been made for
Professor Fishleigh and Mr. Lay to,
conduct an excursion, sometime in
July, to the large automoblie plants in
Detroit. Not only the students enroll-
ed in the course, but also all summer
students interested may make this trip.
Y. W. C. A. CABINET TO GIVE
BANQUET FOR Al)VISORY BOARD
Members of the Advisory Board are
to be guests of the Y. W. C. A. cabinet
at a supper given in their honor Feb.
21, insNewberry Hall, according to
plans made yesterday afternoon at the
cabinet meeting.
Announcement was also made by the
chairman of the Vesper committee of
the services to be held during March.
An unusually strong program has been
arranged, the speakers and their dates
being as follows. March 1, Prof. Louis
A. Strauss; March 8, Prof. Francis W.
Kelsey; March 15, Mr. N. C. Fetter of
the Y. M. C. A.; March 22, Prof. Wil-
liam A. Frayer; March 29, Miss Gert-
rude H. Beggs, social head of Martha
Cook building.
Thedpartygto be given this after-
noon at Newberry Hall for new junior
girls is in charge of the intercollegiate
committee of the Y. W. C. A., assisted
by Wyvern society.
0. G. Andres for shoe repairing. 222
S. State. 'Phone 1718-J. tues-eod
1716-ee

LAND ERS
OR
FLOWERS
PHONE 294 213 E. Liberty St.
Member of Florists' Telegraph
Delivery. Service
Flowers by Wire to All the World.

Prof. W. T. Fishleigh and
Lay to Give Training in
to Constructors

PLAN SHORT COURSE IN SUMMER
SCHOOL IN AUTO ENGINEERING

, ~s ;
r
'

a -

Buy your Engineering Tools at the New Store
Wn. W. Behringer
ii NICKELS ARCADE
All makes Safety Razor Blades Sharpened

ilobson, Hero of )Ierrimac, to Speak
Richmond Pearson Hobson, the hero
of the Merrimac, will speak at the
Presbyterian church at 7:30 o'clock,
Wednesday night, Feb. 21. Captain
Hobson, since his entrance into con-
gress, has been one of the most in-
fluential speakers in the country upon
the question of prohibition. It is in
connection with this subject that he
will talk during his visit to Ann Ar-

bor. The subject of his speech will be,
"Destroying the Great Destroyer."
To Address Classical Club Tonight
Dr. O. F. Butler of the Latin depart-
ment, will address the members of the
Classical club at 8 o'clock this even-
ing in Room A, Alumni hall, on the
subject of "Costumes in Roman Com-
edy." An important business meeting
will be held immediately after the
discussion.

Mr. W E.
Theory

F ^
0 c.h
Fl-G~

1

f
!PN' cool under fire
Ws a good soldier-an
snmoothncss
ss-are

The Lad's "Batting" Record

. f 'i - Eq

1916o Feet

mnior girls who have not paid their
al tax may do so from 8 to 11
>ck today in the Library.
xtension Lectures
Co Much Athletics or Too Little"
he subject of the lecture to be
n tomorrow night by Prof. W.
Fishleigh of the engineering col-
under the auspices of the Grand
ids public library.
'of. W. L. Schurz will discuss
e Present Relations of the United
es to South America" in Grand
en tomorrow night.
'he Fight of the Farmer With
gi" is the subject of a lecture to
riven tomorrow night by Prof. C.
Kaufmann at Addison.
of. C. L. Meader will give a lee-
tomorrow night in Ithaca on
stoi-the. Man and His Message."
of. J. R. Allen will speak on
'kish Life and Customs" tomor-
night in Reed City.

You wear a 1916 hat, a 1916
suit.
But you wear 1716 heels if you
wear leather heels.
You drive a 1916 car, use 1916
office or shop equipment, live
in a 1916 house.
But your leather heels are out
of date.
Leather heels are as obsolete
as mustache cups, celluloid
dickeys and powdered peri-
wigs. They aren't adaptable
to modern conditions.
This is the day of rubber
heels. They are individual
sh ockabsorbers-spine savers
--that make the hardest pave-
ments as soft as a Brussels
carpet.
They are made for 1916 pave.
ments.
Bring your heels up-to-date.
Wear O'Sullivan's Heels of
New Live Rubber.
When you buy your new shoes, buy
them O'Sullivanized.
Insist on O'Sullivanized shoes; the
new live ru~bber heels give the great-
est wear with the greatest resiliency.
Copy'Jig, 1918. O'S. R. Co.
4,Ok
asXr1/ud £s

was bad, says
the note ffom
Prexy to Papa
-which referred
of course to the
"bats" that de-
stroy the body
and break down
the thinking
machinery. The
only cure is back
to the simple
life and

e.

Shredded Wheat
the food that puts you on your feet when
everything else fails. A daily diet of
Shredded Wheat means clear thinking
and quick acting. It leaves the body
strong and buoyant and the brain in
condition to tackle the problems of study
or play. It is on the training table of
nearly every college and university
in this country and Canada. Two
Shredded Wheat Biscuits with milk
or cream supply more real body-
building ,nutriment than meat or eggs
at one-fcurth the cost
Made only by

The Shredded Wheat Company,

Niagara Falls, N. Y.

for th(

Teeth of Chil-

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