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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 14, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


d

Full Dress Suits

$25

$35

$40

Advance Showing of Spring Suits
Top Coats in
Society Brand Clothes
ASK TO SEE OUR SPECIAL
DOLLAR SHIRT

a

Perfect in style and fit

We are showing the very latest in
Furnishings for Evening Wear

1-4 Off On All Wntcr Suits and Overcoats
J. F. WUERTH CO.
NEXT TO ORPHEUM

WE RENT FULL DRESS SUITS

Wadhams & Co.

State St.
'Arcade

Main and
Washington Sts.

Hop2's Over-

Now to the business of the tailored suit and the spring
coat-
Which in their own particular youthful way are just as
charming as many a gorgeous party frock! We have
heaps of new ones that we know you'd love to see.

Hutzel 's

MAIN AND LIBERTY

....-mmmm".

Your Floral Needs==
Are BEST SA-VISFIED By Us
PfONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION
==COUSINS & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.

GRUE N VERITHIN
WATCHES

$25.00 UPWARDS

HALLER & FULLER
STATE STRELI JEWELERS

WARD FELLOWSHIPS TO
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
INDUSTRIAL CONCERNS ASSIST
UNIVERSITY IN RESEARCH
INVESTIGATION
In addition to the University fellow-
ships awarded at the discretion of the
executive board of the Graduate school
there are seven industrial fellowships
under the control of the department
of chemical engineerinf. These are as'
follows:
The Michigan Gas association fellow-
ship of which there are two, amount-
ing to about $400 a year. These are
held this year by H. 0. Andrew, grad.,
and F. C. Binnall.
The Acme White Lead and Color
works' fellowship in paint and varnish
manufacture. This is held this year
by E. A. Brock, grad.
The Michigan Pulp and Paper manu-
facturers' fellowship in chemical en-
gineering which amounts to $600 a
year. C. W. Hallahan, grad., is the
holder of this for the year 1916-1917.
The Detroit Edison company gives
$600 annually for a fellowship in
chemical engineering. This is held
this year by R. S. Archer, grad.
The Detroit Copper and Brass Roll-
ing mills' fellowship of $600 is held
this year by H. J. Smith, grad.-%
The Detroit Steel Casting company
maintains a fellowship of $600 which
is held this year by E. R. Young, Jr.,
grad.
Any graduate of Michigan or any
school may apply for these fellowships
by filling out the blank provided for
the purpose: The application must be
in by March 1 for a fellowship the
following year.
Hospital Notes
H. H. Chapman, '18, was sent to the
scarlet fever ward of the contagious
hospital yesterday afternoon.
Bert Ford, '18, was confined to the
contageous hospital Monday for diph-
theria.
G-AS PLANT EXPLOSION
ENDS CHEMICAL EXPERIMENTS
The explosion which demolished a
portion of the local gas plant on Feb.
3, has affected materially the experi-
mental activities in the chemistry de-
partment of the University, although
the scientific apparatus used in ex-
periments fortunately had been re-
moved from the building to make
ready for the proposed reconstruction
of the plant.
Experiments in the chemistry de-
partment must now be deferred and
all work which the gas fellowship in-
volved must be abandoned entirely
and some other field of research sub-
stituted. This situation will mean a
serious impediment to the seniors of
the engineering department, who are
specializing in this phase of the work.
February Alumnus Appears Thursday
The February number of the Mich-
igan Alumnus is due to appear tomor-
row. It will be known as the Hospital
number and contains an appeal for

MAY INSTALL MODERN
INCINERATING PLINT
CITIZENS WILL NOT TOLERATE
DUMPING OF GARBAGE AT
PRESENT PLACE
When the city garbage contract ter-
minates next September, it is probable
that a modern incinerating or reduc-
tion plant will be ready to take up the
problem of disposing of city refuse.
Prof. W. C. Hoad- of the engineering
college who addressed the city council
on the subject.Monday night said yes-
terday that in his opinion such a plant
will be installed but declined to pro-
phesy what type it will be. The coun-
cil will go to Highland Park on Feb-
ruary 20 to inspect the incinerating
plant there.
Edward Besch, who is the present
holder of the garbage contract, de-
clines to renew it and residen of Ann
Arbor township where garba is be-
ing dumped at present decla that
they will no longer tolerate it. In the
opinion of Prof. Hoad there wil be no
attempt to find another holder for the
contract as members of the council
are of the opinion that the dumping
system is unsatisfactory for a city
the size of Ann Arbor.
The two systems that are tentatively
being considered are the incinerating
system and the reduction process. In
the former refuse is burned to a crisp
in a specially designed furnace and
the ashes which have lost alldisagree-
able qualities aredumped. The reduc-
tion process reduces refuse in such a
way that the resulting products are
commercially valuable.
City Engineer Osgood is now pre-
paring a report for the council that
will embody all the facts in the situa-
tion, including the amount of garbage
to be disposed of and types of plants
suitable for local conditions.

If You Seek
For unvarying quality in Men's
WVear you will find satisfaction at
THE
Varsity Toggery
SHOP
1107 S. University Ave.

Electric Auto Heater--Keeps Your Engine Warm
Costs very little to operate
Washtenaw Electric Shop
The Shop of Quality
If its n, t Rigt we snake it Right
Phone 273 200 East Washington it.

- ~
+ s 41 o '-'* -
Y OU should exercise judg-
ment and care in the se-
lection of a laundry. We will
suggest a good plan. 'Let us
execute a small order for you.
You will be so pleased with it
that you will entrust your valu-
ed garments and linens with us.

--"'
. =
- _ _ - . _ _ _, r-- ,., .

Many
Styles
of Typ
and Ma
Lausn

.4

Hamilton Business Ci
State and Wlllam

ma

TYPEWRITERS
For Rent or Sale

Typewriting
Multigraphing'
Mimeopraphing

A Typewriter Exceptional
For Collegians
Change your type in an instant from one
style to another-or any language.
THE
MULTIP LEX
HAM MOND
Two sets of type in each machine.
"Just Turn the Knob" Presto one or the other
Simple-Compact-Portable
Beautiful work-beyond compare.
If not inclined to a new machine,
inquire for our Factory Rebuilts.
We Rent Machines of high quality.
Patrons: President Woodrow Wilson
Cardinal Merry del Val
Dr. Alexander Graham Bell
Chancellor Rev. B. G. Trant
Bishop John G. Murray
William Dean Howells
also aU Colleges and Urnversile
Our special terms to collegians will
interest you. Catalog for the asking.
Hammond Typewriter Co.
545 East 69th Street
New York City. N. Y. ___

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
System

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Co,
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.
Northwestern Get, 1ilitary Training
Evanston, Ill., Feb. 13.-After a two-
year fight among the trustees, North-
western university today started a
modified military training course.
There will be no drilling or carrying
of arms, but military matters will be
taught in lectures. Phillip Fox, pro-
fessor in astronomy and formerly a
lieutenant in the Twentieth Kansas in-
fantry, will be ira charge of the course.

TALBOT
R ROW,
[arm [FCOLLARS
are curve cut to fa the
shoulders er 'F y Icoh.
S~~~ OU Ior go.,d T
Cluett eabody &Co:Inc. akcrs
Frontier Guards on Friendly Terms
Paris, Feb. 13. - France-Swiss fron-
tier guards are the best of friends and
frequently trade tobacco or play cards
across the boundary line, the French,
however, always remaining on their
own side to escape internment. At some
points a rail fence marks the line.
February's new records are now on
sale at Allmendinger's Music Shop.
122 E. Liberty St. 20-tf

The municipal moving picture film
"Ann Arbor Days" in the making of
which a number of University stu-
dents tooks part, is now being shown
at the Soo and will remain there until
Sunday, Feb. 18, when it will go to
Saginaw. Beginning Feb. 24, it will
be in Fennville for a few days.
The Ann Arbor chapter of the Am-
erican Red Cross society has elected
the following directors: For one year,
Dr. R. W. Bunting, secretary of the
dental college; Rev. Henry Tatlock,
Bishop E. D. Kelly, Rev. Courtland
Miller, Miss Wiona M. Saunders, sec-
retary of the Ann Arbor Civic associa-
tion; Mr. Charles F. Kyer, Rev. L. A.
Barrett; for two years, Mrs. G. W.
Patterson, Mr. H. H. Johnson, Mr.
C. A. Sink, secretary of the School of
Music; Mr. Carl F. Braun, Rev. Lloyd
Douglas, Mrs. J. E. Beal, Mrs. Wooster
W. Beman, Mr. Levi D. Wines; for
three years, Dr. E. K. Herdman, Univer-
sity Secretary Shirley Smith, Dr. T. S.
Langford, Prof. L. P. Hall, of the
dental college; Prof. L. H. Boynton, of
the architectural department: Dr, V.
C. Vaughan, dean of the Medical
School; Miss Fantine Pemberton, of
the University hospital training

City News

Leave Copy ALeave Copy
at at
Quarry's and Students'
TheDeltaADVERTISING Supply Store

Moe Laundry
Phone2- 5 204 No. Main St.
February: Feb. 18, Dr. N. S. Hardikar,
of the Medical- School, will give a pa-
per on "Education in India." This pa-
per was recommended by Pres. Harry
B. Hutchins; Feb. 25, Mr. F. B. Ohling-
er will give an illustrated talk oni
China. He has been 30 years in thatt
country. The society meets at 6:30
o'clock every Sunday evening.
Dr. R. S. Coltman, formerly mayor,
of Ann Arbor and head of the optical#
department in the University hospital,
was visiting friends in the city yes-
terday. He was on his way from New
York City, where he is employed in the
Flora hospital, to his parents home in1
Dexter.
The finance committee of the city
council will meet at 7:30 o'clock to-
morrow evening in the council cham-
bers.
Thtercotlecfat<
Brown: Students of. the university,
through and by means of the co-op-
eration of the Christian association,
are raising funds for the purchase of
ambulances for use in France.
Ohio State: A decrease of nearly
1,100 students marked the registration
for the second semester. Late regis-
tration in the past has amounted to
approximately 700 students, indicat-
ing a probable decrease of 400 stu-
dents after the semester is well under
way.
Iowa: The average weight of the
Iowa freshman girl is 120 pounds, at
least six pounds heavier than the
average weight of the girls attending
eastern schools. The average height
is five feet four inches, age, 19 years
and lung capacity, 164 inches. The
tallest girl is five feet, nine and one-
half inches and the shortest is four
feet, eight and one-half inches. Al-
most half of the girls have blue eyes,a
and 33 per cent have brown eyes. Six-
ty per cent, of the first year women
entered from the farm.
Princeton: Princeton voted 503 to
92 in favor of compulsory military

training at the straw vote held there
recently. Over 90 per cent of the stu-
dents voting declared themselves in
favor of universal service.
California: California students, ex-
cited over the recent presidential elec-
tion, forgot to go to classes and many
of them took an undue nlumber of cuts.
No excuses were granted those who
helped swing the state toward Wilson
by their cutting classes, and many of
the students will be compelled to take
special examinations.
Ohio: A movement is on foot to
abolish all freshman class offices. The
upperclassmen behind the movement
claim that freshmen are not sufficient-
ly acquainted to cast' an intelligent
vote for a candidate and that the hon-
or is an empty one.
Minnesota: According to figures
compiled at the University of Min-
nesota, the avergae cost of going tZ
school in the dentistry department is
$646; in the agricultural, $441, and in
the chemist, $369. The data also shows
that the girls spend $118 annually for
clothing, and $24 for books. The boys
spend on an average $62 a year for
clothing, and $44 for books.
Marquette: A course of ukelele
playing has been added to the curricu-
lum of the Marquette University con-
servatory of music.
Lane Hall Opens for Convention
Lane Hall, home of the Student Y.
M. C. A., will be formally opened by
the convention of student volunteers,
which meets in Ann Arbor, Feb. 23,
24, and 25. The basement and second
floor of the building are receiving a
last coat of paint this week, and the
contractors report the edifice fast
nearing completion.
Shirts made to masure. G. H. Wild
Co., Leading Merchant Tailors. State
St. tf
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
use The Michigan Daily as their ad-
vertising medium. ,

UN-

FOR REKT
FOR RENT- Immediately. 10 room
modern house, good locality, steam,
heat, part furnished if desired. Call
2161-J after 6 P. M. 13-17 incl.
FOR RENT- Very desirable single
room for young lady. Centrally lo-
cated. 515 Cheever Court. 2080-M.
14-15
FOR RENT- Single room on second
floor. $2.25 per week. 908 Monroe
Ave. Phone 1549-R. 13-14
FOR RENT-- One single room, two
blocks from campus. Phone 1206-W.
14-15-16
FOR RENT-Don't leave that store,
office, house, flat or room vacant
any longer-Rent it by a want ad in
The Michigan Daily.

WANTED

WANTED- Four young ladies with
selling experience. Part time work.
Phone 433-M for appointment Thurs-
day afternoon. 14-15
WANTED-Children to care for after-
noons. Call 1123-R.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Banjo, professional style
Friedrich make, cost $20.00, will sell
for $12.00 cash. Inquire Mrs. K. M.
Webster, 133 Waverly Ave., S. E.,
Grand Rapids, Mich. 13-18 incl.
LOST.
LOST-Medium sized leather not book
with important notes at Wahr's or
Sheehan's. Reward for return to 206
S. Thayer, or call 988-J. 14

improvements in the University hos- school, and Dr. Reuben Peterson.
pitals. One of the articles deals with ' The Board of Public Works of the
the work of Albert A. Robinson, '69, city will meet at 7:30 o'clock tonight
'69E, honorary law, '00, in the building to receive bids for the proposed new
of the Sante Fe railroad. The alumni Broadway bridge.
banquets at New York City and San The Students' society of the Unitar-
Francisco are also discussed. ian church announced yesterday the
following program for their meetings
Try a Michigan Daily Want Ad. for the remainder of the month of

a -

moolmommomm

____ _

Grinnell Bros.' Music House

See us for anything in the
Realm of Music

TRY OUR VICTOR RECORD APPROVAL SERVICE

116 S. Main St.

+{

Phone 1707

I F

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