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January 27, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-27

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UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
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VOL. XXVI. No. 88.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1917

PRICE FIVE CENT

V-

x r

BELIEVES PURPOSE
OF HONOR SYSTEM
HAS BEEN ACHIVDI
SENTIMENT IS THAT FAVORABLE
OPIMON WILL CONTINUE
TO DEVELOP
RESULT PLEASING
TO DEAN EFFINGER

Lodge Not barred
from White House

Maintains Movement Will Bring About
Spirit of Responsibility To-
ward University
By Donald A. Smii, 17E.
This article was written for The
Daily by a student who was large-
ly instrumental in furthering the
adoption of the honor system in .
the engineering college.
As a result of the votes taken Thurs-
day and Friday in classes in the liter-
ary college regarding the adoption of
the honor system, a large number of
courses will make use of the plan
in the coming examinations. No de-
finite figures can be obtained. but the
appreciable number of students who
voted favorably upon the question has
given supporters of the movement
every reason to feel encouraged.
The general sentiment on the cam-
pus is that an important step has
been taken in the right direction and
that the favorable opinion which is
now well under way will continue to
develop. Never since the introduction
of the honor system in Michigan has
the subject been so widely and thor-
oughly discussed as it has during the
past few weeks.
Close observers of this \discussion
Say that it is already being reflected in
an increased feeling of responsibility
toward the University, and that dis-
honesty in the coining semcters will
be reduced to a minimum.
Architects Support Move ment
Dean John R. Effinger, of the liter-
ary college, expressed himself last
night as being greatly pleased with
the progress of the movement. "I
am very glad," he said, "that the ques-
tion has been introduced into the lit-
erary college and discussed so gener-
ally among the students. It has re-
sulted in the expression of " definite
ideas with regard to the honor sys-
tem and I feel sure that the effect
upon the student body in general will
be a very salutarry one."
The honor system has received the
active suport of the students in
the department of architecture. Noth-
ing has been done, however, in the .
way of adopting a formal plan for the
department itself inasmuch as a large
part of the work these students is
done in engineering courses where the
system is hlseady in operation. The
officers of the senior class of architec-
tects are strongly in favor of the
spirit which the plan is producing in
their department,
Dental College to Vote
Dean Marcus L. Ward, of the dental
college, said last night that the ques-
tion will be taken up early next week
by the dental faculty and that they are
very anxious to have an honor system
In successful operation.
"We are strongly in favor of the
honor system if the students are back
of it," said Dean Ward. "Its use in
examinations is a secondary consider-
ation with us. It is more important
that such spirit should be in opera-
tion throughout the year in all class
work.'
Brings Up Dishonesty Question
With these facts in mind it is ob-
vious that the purpose of the move-
ment has been accomplished. There
has been a great deal of adverse crit-
icism of the methods employed by the
-Student council, but can anyone say
that another plan would have accomn-
(Continued on Page Six.)
NO MINIATURE J-HOP
Plans for Union Party Dropped; But
Few Signed Up for Dance
There will be no "Miniature J-hop"
at the Union this year. At a late hour

last night only 12 men had signed the
paper at the Union, signifying their
desire to attend the smaller party.
It was only at the request of the hop
committee that the student council
agreed to put on such a dance, and
then only if, at least, 70 men wished
to attend the affair.

Men Who Started "Leak" Probe Still
Meibhers of Washington So-
eety-Elect
Washington, Jan. 26. - If United
States Senator Lodge,'of Massachus-
etts, doesn't go to the White House
social functions or to see President
Wilson on business it isn't the Presi-
dent's or Mrs. Wilson's fault. Re-
ports that Senator Lodge and Repre-
sentative Wood, who started the "leak"
investigation were "under White
House ban" are not "strictly true" it
was stated officially at the executive
nansion today.
Senator Lodge received an invitation
to the congressional reception at the
White House Wednesday night. Rep-
resentative Wood did not, it was
stated.
DENOUNCES EXPENSE Of
WILSON'S INAUGURATON
S,'N A4 1TOR WORKS CLATIS COMMIT-
TE E IS MAKING CEREMONY
UN-DEMOCRATIC
Washington, Jan. 26.-Denouncing
the proposed expenditure of $25,000 on
President Wilson's coming inaugura-
tion as "turning the affair into a cor-
onation" Senator Works, of California,
is the senate this afternoon bitterly
arraigned the inaugural committee for
"making such a spectacular show" of
the event.
"This coronation is un-Democratic,"
asid Works. "I am opposed to such
show. Let us be reasonable for once
and have a simple ceremony instead
of a coronation.' "I also hope some-
thing is done along those lines," chim-
ed in Senator Sherman, of Illinois.
One of the senators declared Wash-
ingten house wives are organizing to
charge $3 a night per cot.
SELECT MID-WEST
DEBATING TEAMS

GermanCrown Prince Launches
tack on Hill s04 and Dead
Man's Hill

At-

GERMANY STARTS
OFFENSIVE SOUTH
First Clash With French Defenders
Marked by Heavy
Fighting
BERLIN REPORTS CAPTURE
OF 500 FRENCH SOLDIERS

Illinois, Wisconsin, and Michigan
Contest Strike and Lock-
out Question

to

London, Jan. 26.-Germany has,
started a southern offensive toward
Verdun and an offensive of whose first
clash with the French defenders has
been marked by desperate hand-to-
hand fighting on the slopes of hill 304
and Dead Man's hill.
Both Berlin and Paris statements to- .
day agreed on the fighting in thisE
neighborhood, but Berlin claimed a
general occupation of French trenches
across the front of more than a mile;
and dignified the advance as a part of
an assault in force by mentioning the9
generals in command of the attackers1
and listing several regiments as par-
ticipators.
The French official statement, how-;
ever, while recording that the attack
came from four different points, stated
that "only small enemy parties pene-
trated our advance positions." TheI
Berlin report detailed the capture of
500 French- soldiers and ten machine
guns. The fact that the German state-
ment added that infantry forces were1
"assisted efficiently by artillery pio-
neers and mine throwers indicated it
was a thoroughly prepared and strong-
ly executed movement."
Berlin also asserted that French
counter attacks launched last night
had failed to recover the ground lost
to the enemy. Hill 304 and Dead Man's
hill immediately adjoining have been
soaked with blood in the most bitter
fighting probably in the whole western
front.
It was against these positions that
the crown prince again launched his.
attack, seeking progress toward Ver-
dun. Capture of further Russian posi-
tions on both sides of the River Aa
(Riga front), and the repulse of strong
hostile counter attacks on the east
bank were announced in the Berlin'
statement. Five hundred prisoners
were brought in from these operations.
DOCTOR STEVENSON
TO SPEAK SUNDAY
President of Princeton Seminary
Comes to Ann Arbor as Tap-
pan Lecturer
President J. Ross Stevenson of
Princton seminary will deliver the
Tappan lecture at the Presbyterian
church Sunday evening at 7:30 o'clock.
At noon he will speak to the University
classes at the Presbyterian church and
will meet the students informally at
McMillan hall at 4 o'clock.
Doctor Stevenson is well known as
a teacher and as a clergyman. For a
number of years he taught in McCor-
mick seminary in Chicago and later
occupied pulpits in New York and
Baltimore. Doctor Stevenson gave up
the ministry to become president of
Princeton seminary.
Engineering Society Hears Menefee
F. N. Manefee gave an instructive
lecture at 7:30 o'clock last evening in
the new Science building, under the
auspices of the Engineering society.
The lecture was on the new Wissota
dam on the Chippewa river near Chip-
pewa Falls, Wis. With the aid of
motion pictures he was able to show
the actual process of construction and
the men at work.
Mr. A. Streiff, consulting engineer
for the Fargo Construction company,
also talked, illustrating his address
with slides on spillways

CIVIL SERVICE FOR
ALL POSTMASTERS
Senate Passes Resolution Stating Of-
fice to Be Non-political
hereafter
DEPARTMENTAL EMPLOYEES
TO GET HIGHER SALARIES
Increase to Be Regulated According
to Present Wages of
Men
Washington, Jan. 26. - All Uncle
Sam's departmental employees who re-
ceive $480 or less a year will get 15
per cent increase and those receiv-
ing more than $480 and less than $1000
get a ten per cent increase under the
legislative, executive, and judicial- bill
passed by the senate this afternoon
and by an amendment to the bill offer-
ed by Senator Poindexter and adopted
by the senate late this afternoon all
postmasters will come under the civil
service laws.
Postmasters now serving automat-
ically come under civil service with-
out taking a further examination.
The resolution says: The office of
postmaster in each class shall here-
after be a non-political office and
shall be within the the civil service
and appointments. thereto shall bef
made in accordance with civil service
rules and so far as practicable by pro-
motion or transfer upon merit without
regard for politics from the employeesi
of the postoffice department subject to
the permanent civil service regula-
tions and requirements.
Combined Clubs",
To Give Concert;
Favorites of Trip Numbers to Appear
in Annual J-hop Program
Saturday, Feb. 10
The annual J-hop concert by the
University Glee and Mandolin club
will be given Saturday afternoon, Feb.1
10, in Hill auditorium. The program
to be presented will be that given dur-
ing the trip with but few variations.'
The ban jorine sextet, mandolin quar-
tet, and Varsity and Midnight Sons
quartets will be remembered as dis-
tinctive features of the last concert,
and all these will be on hand again.
Chase B. Sikes, '16, and Horace L.1
Davis, '17, will offer solos, the former
rendering, by request, "The Toreadori
Song." It is likely that the trip con-
cert program will be followed closely
because of the fact that all the num-
bers have been perfected by long prac-
tice.
Further information as to the pro-
gram will be announced in the J-hop
number of The Daily.
ARTICLE AIDS SALE
Criticism in January Inlander Causes
Comment on Campus
As was confidently expected, the
January number of the Inlande was
eagerly received by the campus yes-
terday, the article entitled "Co-educa-
tion and Michigan Athletics," by
Maurice F. Dunne, '17L, exciting no
small amount of criticism among the
men as well as women of the student
body. Communications have already
been received by the staff of the maga-
zine- warmly supporting or as vigor-
ously denouncing Dunne's philosophy.
The business manager of the publi-
cation stated yesterday evening that

the total number of sales had nearly
exhausted the edition but that there
were still a number of copies to be
had at several of the local book stores.
Congress Pushes Hawaiian Dry Bill
Washington, Jan. 26.-Congress gave
another shove to the prohibition jug-
gernaut today when the house terri-
tories committee reported favorably
the bill to make the Hawaiian islands
l elry.

Schwabsto Make
Shells for U. S.

Bethlehem Steel Company President
Ready to Do Duty as Patriotic
Citizen
Washington, Jan. 26.-As president
of the Bethlehem Steel company,
Charles M. Schwab told Secretary
Daniels today that he is ready to do
his duty as a patriotic citizen in mak-
ing shells or ships for the United
States.
His remarks were apropos of
Daniel's recent criticism of the con-
cern for its projectile bid far higher
than the Hadfield's British bid, but at
the close of a two-hour conference
both men were silent about details.
BOSTON SYMPHOUNYGIVES
PROGRM OF EXCELLENCE

PLANS COMPLETE
FOR 1917 FORMAL
JU'NIOR HOP PARTY
DECORATIONS TO CONSIST OF
PINK, WHITE AND
GREEN
DRAW FOR PLACES
MONDAY AFTERNOON

J
12
ti
O
a
R
tl
a
IR

MUSICIANS PLAY AS ONE
UNDER LEADERSHIP OF
DOCTOR MUCK

MAN

Final selection of the two teams
which will debate in the Mid-west De-
bating league was made by the oratory'
faculty yesterday.
The affirmative team which will de-
bate Illinois at Ann Arbor is composed
of L. W. Lisle, '17L, N. D. Ireland,
'18L, R. W. Ward, '18, and alternate,
H. F. Massnick, '18. The negative
team debating University of Wisconsin
at Madison, Wis., is S. D. Frankel, '17L,
P. A. Miller, '17L, and R. F. Kahle,
'17, and alternate, J. R. Simpson, '18.
The question to be debated this year
in the Mid-west circuit is: "Resolved,
That strikes and lockouts should be
prohibited in public utilities and in+
coal mines, prior to an investigation of
the merits of the dispute by a govern-
mental board.'"
The debates are to be held March
30, Michigan's affirmative team debat-
ing Illinois in Hill auditorium and
Michigan's negative team going to
Madison.
Since the organization of the Mid-
west Debating league Michigan has
won six out of the seven debates which
have been held with Wisconsin and
has also won a majority of the debates
with Illinois.
New Building on Maynard Street
Housing a restaurant and two four
room apartments, a new building is
being erected on Maynard street op-
posite the Arcade, for Adam Schroen
by the Koch Building and Supply com-
pany, of this city. The contract calls
for the completion of the structure
by April 1.
The interior decorations have been
harmonized to meet the requirements
of a modern dining hall. Alcoves
for semi-private parties, and a soda
fountain are included in the speci-
fications.
lRe-port Dean Schlotterbeck Improved
Dean PJ. . Schlotterbeck, of the
College of Pharmacy, who has been
confined at St. Joseph's hospital since
the holidays is improving gradually.
Dean Schlotterbeck was able to sit
up for a brief time yesterday and it
is hoped that he may be removed to
his home next week.

It is seldom that an Ann Arbor audi-5
ence has the opportunity to hear an
orchestral program of more genuinet
worth, or a program rendered in at
more faultless manner, than the one
presented by the Boston Symphony b
orchestra last evening in Hill audi-a
torium.
This splendid band of 100 musiciansp
played together as one man, and, un- 1
der the direction of Dr. Karl Muck,o
brought out shadings and color effects
which would be difficult to improve
n
upon.
Schumann's "RhrJsh Symphony"a
was the first number and this noblee
work received a splendid reading ate
the hands of the musicians. The en-_
tire composition was characterized bya
a wealth of beautiful singing melodies
which were developed and worked out
in an unusually effective manner. v
Brahm's Academic Festival overturec
was more brilliant than the precedingr
work and centered around four Ger-k
man college songs. These songs weren
brought out in a prominent manner
and made the overture both interest-f
ing as a composition, and pleasing to0
listen to.
Bizet's Suite No. 1 from "L'Arles-
ienne" wos given an intelligent anda
pleasing interpretation, the Minuetto
movement being especially effective.t
The program came to a grand climax
at the end when Wagner's overture to
the opera "Tannhauser" ras playedt
in a manner that left little to be de-
sired. This composition, with its fa-
miliar "Pilgrims' Song", and other mo-
tives which are scarcely less familiar,s
was well fitted to bring this splendid
program to a close.
The entire program was admirably1
chosen, both from the point of variety
and interest, and also as regardsc
length. '
' 1 I
ABSENCE COMMITTEE CONVENESf
TO HEAR ATTENDANCE EXCUSES1
Students who have absences re-
corded against them will be given their
last opportunity to explain irregular-1
ities next Thursday when the attend-
ance committee meets.
The hours for women will be from
11 to 12 o'clock in the morning and for
men from 3 to 4 o'clock in the after-
noon. All absences not taken care of
at these periods will be chalked up as
unexcused.
EMPEROR CHARLES TO VISIT
KAISER ON BIRTHDAY TODAY
Berlin, Jan. 26.-Emperor Charles of
Austro-Hungary with Foreign Minister
Count Czernin started today for Ger-
man headquarters to visit Emperor
William on his birthday tomorrow.
Wilson Congratulates Sufragists
Washington, Jan. 26.-Expressing an
interest in the extension of suffrage to
women President Wilson today wrote
a letter to Mrs. Cary Chapman Catt,
,president of the National Women's
Suffrage, association congratulating
that organization in its work in se-
curing passage by the North Dakota
legislature of suffrage legislation.

Daily to Issue Souvenir Edition
Night of Dance with Extra
on- Following Morning

on

All the stage is now set for the 1917
J-hop, which will be held on the even-
ing of Feb. 9, in Waterman gymnasium.
When the people enter the large hall
they will be greeted by elaborate dec-
orations of spring foliage in pink,
white, and green. At one end will be
a streaming banner of maize and blue,
while on the other will be the class
numerals "1918."
, At 9:15 o'clock Waldo McKee, '18E,
and Miss Dorothy Leonard of Grand
Rapids will lead the grand march of
500 couples to the strains of two or-
chestras stationed in different parts of
the gymnasium. From then until the
hour of 3 o'clock the dancing will con-
tinue.
Announcement was made last night
by the committee that the programs
and favors for this year's party will
be entirely different from those of any
previous hop. Favors and programs
for the ladies will be separate, while
those of the men will be together, but
of a novel nature.
Obtain Outside Talent.
Two clowns, who were formerly con-
nected with Ringling Brothers circus,
will put on a feature act for the
amusement of the crowd during the
evening, while other big features, the
exact nature of which are not to be
known until the night of the party.
are on the program.
The committee wishes to announce
for the third time that although they
will furnish coffee, punch, wafers and
cakes, that all containers for the punch
and coffee must be supplied by the va-
rious booths. Also, if any devices for
keeping the coffee hot are wanted, they
must be furnished by the occupants.
Drawings for the different locations
for booths will take place from 2 to 5
o'clock on Monday afternoon, Feb. 5.
Any group of ten independents who
may desire to get a booth are to meet
at the Union at 9:30 o'clock tomorrow
morning to make arrangements with
the committee. They will draw for
locations at the same time as the fra-
ternities on Feb. 5.
Special Issues of Daily.
All men who cannot use their hop
tickets and wish to assign them to
some junior or senior, may do so at
the same time as the drawings for
booths take place.
Besides the souvenir issue of The
Daily Friday night, an extra edition
of ten pages will appear Saturday
morning telling about the affair of the -
previous night, and containing cuts of
men prominent in the management of
the hop, as well as cuts of some of
the feature acts put on by the outside
talent.
The list of chaperones for the party
are as follows: President H. B. Hutch-
ins and Mrs. Hutchins, Regent J. E.
Beal and Mrs. Beal, Dean M. E. Cooley
and Mrs. Cooley, Dean J. R. Effinger
and Mrs. Effinger, Dean V. C. Vaughan
and Mrs. Vaughan, Dean H. M. Bates
and Mrs. Bates, Registrar A' G. Hall
and Mrs. Hall, Dean A. H. Lloyd and
Mrs. Lloyd, Dean W. B. Hinsdale and
Mrs. Hinsdale, Dean W. H. Butts and
Mrs. Butts, Dean M. L. Ward and Mrs.
(oCntinued on Page Six.)
PASS HARBORS BILL
House Appropriates $39,000,000 for
Water Way Improvements
Washington, Jan. 26.-The rivers
and harbors bill carrying an appro-
priation of $39,000,000 was passed by
the house this afternoon by a vote of
221 to 132. Provision was stricken out
on a point of order which would have
created a commission 'to investigate
the advisability of a comprehensive
system of river and harbor improve-

ments and the development of numer-
ous other activities incident to the-
use of water ways and water power.

TAPPAN LECTURE
Pres. J. ROSS STEVENSON
Princeton Seminary
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Sunday Evening Jan. 28
7:30 O'CLOCK

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