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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 25, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

id-Winter Clearance 1

1FF I

I Suits and OvercoatsI
STEIN-BLOCK and MICHAEL-STERN
1-4 Off CLOTHES 1-4 Off
Entire stock fancy and mixed Entire stock blue and black
Suits and Overcoats Suits and overcoats
AT 1-4 OFF AT 201k OFF
All trousers over $4.00 Our entire stock
MACKINAWS
AT 20y OFF AT 20% OFF
11 LindeIschmitt, Apfel & Co.
PX111 i~l 1Iltillilllllilllll111l l l l l l1111l 11111iill lIll lll illll i l 111'e=-ililg
Djer Kiss - Mary Garden
Houbigants-Pivers

THOUSANDS ATTEND BIG
AUTO SHOWIN DETROIT
ANNV1 MI 1)-WINTER EXHIBIT IN
T-A 'E-NACLE, TEIflEI FIN-
EST EVER
With, the largest Monday afternoon
attendan-e in the history of Detroit
automojbile shows, the annual mid-
winter exhibit in the tabernacle build-
ing started the week in a very satis-
factory manner. A continual stream
of contented people poured in and out
of the tabernacle for the first two days,
the aggregate running into the thous-
ands.
The showgoers first comment is on
the layout of the building. Its beauty
is contagious and veterans do not
hesitate in proclaiming it one of the
best looking shows ever held in any
city, not excepting the national affairs.
The Japanese scheme of decoration fits
nicely in the big structure, and there
is such harmony in the varied hues-
and articles used to bring it out, that
the artistic sense of George W. Graves,
the architect and designer, is highly
complimented.
In keeping with the surroundings,
the cars exhibited are far ahead of
anything ever before produced. They
are spick and span, the refinement of
years of research on the part of ex-
ceptional engineers and clever de-
signers.
More buyers have been at the ses-
sions so far, than expected. There
have been many downright sales and
innumerable prospects are registered
in the little books of the salesmen.
One of the factory men who is help-
ing out at a booth remarked that he
never had seen so many people who
are ready to pay cash for cars, few
asking terms or even trades. Different
factory bands play in the afternoon
and evening and many soloists, em-
ployes of the several manufacturing
companies, are rendering numbers
with true knowledge of music.

STUDENT CONFERENCE TO
BE HELD IN ANN AROR
PLAN TO ACCOMMODATE 200 DELE.
GATES AT MEETINGS ON
FEB. 23 TO 25
The second quadrennial student vol-
unteer conference for the state of
Michigan is to be held in Ann Arbor
this year, beginning Feb. 23 and con-
tinuing through Feb. 25. The local
committee is making plans for the ac-
commodation of 200 delegates.
The first quadrennial conference was
held four years ago at Lansing pre-
ceding the international convention
with its 5,000 student delegates at
Kansas City in 1914, and 'the Ann Ar-
bor conference is the forerunner of
another international convention to be
held next year. The University of
Michigan was represented at the Lan-
sing convention by 76 delegates, and
at the larger gathering by a delega-
tion of 60. Since the state conference
is to be this year in Ann Arbor, it is
hoped that many more students will
be able to take advantage of its op-
portunities.
The purpose of the student volun-
teer movement is to interest students
in the work of the church in other
lands. There is a feeling among the
leaders of the movement that hundreds
of America's Christian students should
and their places in the mission fields
of the world, whether their work is
in the line of engineering, medicine,
or law.
SUGGESTS ROTH FOR MAYOR
H. H. HERBST SAYS PROFESSOR
WOULD BE INVALUABLE AS CITY
EXE CUTIVE

i

Here it is Men

Now is the time for Action
on your part, the final clean-
up prices are now in effect
and that is the equal for you
to come straight to Reule-

Conlin, Feigel

Co. and

choose one of these fine
Winter Suits or Overcoats
at this
BIG REDUCTION SALE

Reule Conlin, Feigel Co.

i..

and Other Good Perfumes at

The Eberbach & Son Co.
200-204 E. Liberty St.

sums

i

One of Our Dinners
Served fromI 11 to 7
Regular Dinner 35c consists choice of
meats; mashed or boiled potatoes; one
vegetable; choice of pie or pudding; tea,
coffee, or milk.
SPECIALS, as served
Soup .o with meat order .05
Roast or Fricassee of chicken .25
Roast Prime Ribs of Beef .25
Roast Leg of Veal with Dressing .25
Pork Sausage with Sweet Potatoes .25
Pork Chops Breaded. Extra Special .25
Small Steak with Onions. Ex. Spec'l .25
Bread and Mashed Potatoes included
with above meat orders.
Side Orders Extra
Potatoes mashed .05 Stewed tomatoes .o5
Potatoes boiled .05eStewed corn .05
Potatoes fried .05 Stewed peas .05
Potatoes german fried .05

Cordovan s
We have just received
another shipment of
this popular shoe in
BLACK and TAN.
Special Agency Nettleton shoes

A.

Cleaning, Pressing, Repair-
ing and Remodelling of dress
suits.

Patterns and styles for spring
clothes are arriving daily for
your inspection.

WAHiR'S Shoe Stores

MARQUARDT

Offer Prizes for
iest Prison essay

CAMPUS TAILOR
516 E. Williams St.

Home made pies per cut .05
tard ., with cream =o.
Coffee .05 Tea .o05
Milk per bottle .o5
STATE
TREET LUN
Open All Night. J. A. QUAC

Rice cus-'

Chocolate .50
Cocoa .10
CH
KENBUSH, Mgr.

11 ntcrCo1(c0tat
Wisconsin: Statistics gathered by the
doctors who examine every student
seeking admission to the University,
show that of the 6,000 students en-
rolled, 3,000 of them have eye trou-
ble. Of this number two per cent
more men were affected that the
women, and half of the defects were
cured by properly fitted glasses.
Harvard: Harvard is working toward
the re-establishment of basketball
as an intercollegiate sport. No of-
ficial announcement has been made
but officers of the Intercollegiate
Basketballsleague have been quiet-
ly at work to have Harvard re-en-
ter the sport.
Iowa: Mental tests have been given
this fall to all of the freshmen who
entered the university. The conclus-
ions to be drawn from the records
show that the engineering freshmen
were slightly superior to the literary
freshmen and that the men of the
literary college were quite a bit
superior in ability to the women.
The information gathered will be
used to advise the entrants as to
what work they had best follow.
Children's aancing class at the
Packard. Fridays, 3:30 P. M. 16tf

Illinois: The Siren, the humor mag-
azine of Illinois, is sponsoring a
movement to have all the heads of
the humorous publications of the
various universities meet in a con-
vention to be held some time in
the spring. Some city, as far as pos-
sible mutually accessible, is to be
chosen as the meeting place. Col-
umbus and Cleveland have been
mentioned, as well as Chicago and
Pittsburg.
Named house Committee Chairman
T. S. Cox, '17, has been appointed
chairman of the house committee of
the Union. Those who will work on
the committee with him are, L. B.
Hadley, '17E, H. M. Stephens, '18E,
and F. C. Bell, '19. There will be a
meeting at 4:30 o'clock today at the
Union.
Federation of Charities Thanks Girls
In a note received at the University
Y. W. C. A yesterday, the Ann Arbor
Federation of Charities extended
hearty thanks to the University girls
for the money and dolls contributed
at Christmas.
Announce Courses for Summer School
Courses and instructors for the sum-
mer school 1917, will be announced
some time the first part of next week.
Dance records, 12 inches double disc
with just the right swing, only $1.
Allmendinger's Music Shop, 122 E.
Liberty St. 20-tf
Now is the Time to Buy Shirts. Man-
hattan Shirt Sale at Reule-Conlin-Fie-
gel Co. Main St.
Get your shoes fixed at Paul's Place
611 E. William St. 5tf,

Phases of Problem to Be
Theses; Given by Mr.
Lewisohn

The national committee on prisons,
located at Columbia university,
through the courtesy of Mr. Adolph
Lewisohn, is offering three prizes for
theses or essays or phases of the pris-
on problem. The prizes are as fol-
lows:
First, for a master's thesis, $50;
second, for an undergraduate essay,
$25; third, for an essay prepared by
a student of a preparatory school, $25.
The judges who will make the
awards are Prof. J. C. Egbert of Co-
lumbia university, Dr. Hastings H.
Hart of the Russell Sage foundation,
and the Hon. William H. Wadhams,
judge of the court of general sessions,
New York city.
All duly accredited students in the
University are eligible to compete for
the prizes. For further information
application should be made to the na-
tional committee on prisons, Broad-
way and 116th street, New York city.
Pictures of New Dam and Talk by Prof.
ENGINEERING SOCIETY TO GIVE
NOVEL PROGRAM ON FRIDAY

Subject for
Adolph

1
i
i
1
r
7
1
i
l

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
I was discussing municipal matters
with a friend, who asked me the ques-
tion: "Whom ought we to have for our
next mayor?" tI answered, "Ann Ar-
bor is a representative, and peculiar
city in many respects. We have many
and large educational gatherings. Hun-
dreds of visitors come here during our
May festivals, summer schools and
other attractions for recreation, pleas-
ure, and study. This city should have
at its head a man whom we would be
proud to be represented by when oc-
casion required, a man of wide ex-
perience in municipal affairs."
After some thought, I expressed my-
self to the effect that I could think of
no person who could so creditably fill
the position as Filibert Roth, recent
president, and at present a director of
the Civic association, a man thor-
oughly familiar with civic matters, a
fine, entertaining speaker before audi-
ences of all kinds, be they labor or-
ganizations, religious, political or edu-
cational; a kind, genial and good fel-
low to everyone. He is a man who
would not only be invaluable in as-
sisting this city in the many difficult
problems which confront it, but would
be a credit and honor in representing
us on public occasions whenever op-
portunity offered.

Main St.

ways appreciated and the city honors
them when occasions present them-
selves. Professor Thompson, Drs.
Darling and Copeland were three as
efficient mayors as ever took charge
of this city. Dean M. E. Cooley was
president of the council for two years.
The voters of Ann Arbor were only
too glad to avail themselves of the
services of such valuable men.
Voters of Ann Arbor, irrespective of
parties, let us make a rousing demon-
stration in favor of Filibert Roth for
our next mayor. H. H. HERBST.
Outline Program
of Exam Concerts
Twilight Recitals to Extend Through-
out First Week of
Finals
The following outline of the twilight
concerts to be given in Hill auditor-
ium each day at 4:15 during the first
week of examinations was announced
yesterday.
Monday, Jan. 29, Blanche Williams,
organist; Carol Wadhams, pianist;
Mrs. Verna Luther, soprano.
Tuesday, Jan. 30, Helen Baluss, or-
ganist; Laura Henkel, pianist; singer
to be announced.
Wednesday, Jan. 31, regular faculty
concert. Suite for organ and strings,
Telemann, Earl V. Moore, organ; Mr.
and Mrs. S. P. Lockwood, violins;
Anthony J. Whitmire, viola; Lee N.
Parker, 'cello; and Horace L. Davis,
bass. Vocal selection, Ada Grace
Johnson. Suite for violin and piano,
Stanley, Albert Lockwood, piano, and
S. P. Lockwood, violin.
Thursday, Feb. 1, Frank A. Taber,
organist; Chase B. Sikes, bass; pian-
ist to be announced.
Friday, Feb. 2, Emily Powell, organ-
ist; Andrew Haigh, pianist; S. P. Lock-
wood, violinist; singer to be an-
nounced.
The general public is invited to
these recitals for which no admission
will be charged.

I

State St.

/ O

F. N. Menefee to Feature
Meeting

Alarm clocks, $1.00 up.
Jeweler, 113 South Main St.

Chapman,
tues-eod

Under the auspices of the Engineer-
ing society an interesting program has
been arranged for Friday evening in
the new Science building.
Through the courtesy of the Kelsey-
Brewer and company, public utility
operators of Grand Rapids, the Fargo
Engineering company will present mo-
tion pictures, showing the construction
of the Wissota dam on the Chippewa
river near Chippewa Falls, Wis., with
explanations by Prof. F. N. Menefee.
Mr. A. Streiff, hydraulic designing
engineer, with the Fargor Engineer-
ing company, will -give a half hour
talk on spillways in general, illus-
trated by lantern slides of the various
kinds of movable spillway gates.
Featuring hot soda for zero weather.
Bloomfields. N. University.

Ann Arbor would do itself honor if
it would elect him to this important
office and persuade him to accept it.
I have not seen Mr. Roth for over a
year and do not know if he would ac-
cept the trust, but I know him to be
a public-spirited man and feel that he
would accept the honor if tendered to
him.
I have heard expressions to the ef-
fect that some voters might object t
the election of a university man to
that office. I take no stock in such
talk. The University represents over
one-third of the city's population. It
contributes over one-half of its sup-
port. The professors, instructors, and
parents who come here to have their
children educated pay a large share
of the taxes.
This the voters of Ann Arbor know,
or should know, and the few narrow-
minded, prejudiced persons who can-
not see this have but little influence
and form a minute factor in deciding
such questions.
The fault lies more in the fact that
the faculty of the University does not
take enough interest in the city of
which they should form an important
part. Whenever they do take an in-
terest in their city's affairs, it is al-

".."T6ORjf
.C @u~ YOi~i m'uN

V
/

Suit and Overcoat"S

1-3 Off

On Suits and O'Cc
You take no chances,

buying a suit or

overcoat of

Leave CopyALeave Co y
atat
Quarry's and Students
TheDelta .,,D ESuTpplyN GSto're''
Th~OhaADVERTISING
FOR SALE LOST.
FOR SALE - Dress suit, silk lined, LOST-On campus Monday morning
medium stout, $15.00. Call at 410 between 10 and 12, Chemistry note
E. Liberty between 12:30 and 2:00 book. Call C. D. Wiley. 548-M.
P. M. 25-26 Reward. 24-25
FOR SALE OR RENT-Coasting bobs LOST-Don't wish for that lost article
seating ten. Phone 1398-M or J. L Ds .a
25-26-27 -Recover it by an ad in The Daily.

SPECIAL AFTER INVENTORY SALE
Musical Instruments, Cases etc.
We have a number of New and shop worn VIOLINS-MANDOLINS
GUITARS - BANJO MANDOLINS - CASES etc., which we
have REDUCED TO A REMARKABLY LOW FIGURE! These
bargains must be seen to be appreciated. Look them over.

"Y" Book Exchange Open Feb. 1-15
The "Y" book exchange will open at
Lane hall Feb. 1 and continue until
Feb. 15. T. R. Cooke, '17, and O. N.'
Auer, '17P, are to be in charge of the
exchange. Anyone can bring in his
booksrand exchange or sell them for
the price he sets.
The exchange will probably be open
in the evening as well as in the day.
Science Academy Meets Here in March
March 28, 29 and 30 are the dates set
for the meeting of the Michigan Acad-
emy of Science, which will be held in
Ann Arbor this year. Prof. W. H.
Hobbs, president of the organization,
will deliver the opening address. The
outside speaker of the meeting will be
Prof. R. W. Wood of John Hopkins uni-
versity.

.. I..

our goods are all new and up
date.
Another big shipment of Spri
Hats.

TOM CORBET'
116 E. Liberty Street
Genuine leather book covers
great discount. Allmendinger's Mu
Shop, 122 E. Liberty St. 20
The Greatest Shirt in the World
the Manhattan-at Sale Prices.. Reu
Conlin-Fiegel Co.. 200-202 Main St.

WANTED
WANTED-To buy visible typewriter
for spot cash. E. R. L. Michigan
Daily. 20-tf

FOB RLUAT
FOR RENT-Exceptionally fine double
front room for two. Forest avenue.
Phone 2239-R. 24-25-26-27

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Main St.
PHONE 1707

1 iI

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