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October 08, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-08

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UNITED PRESS \i
DAY AND NIGHT SERV2
THE ONLY MORNING PAP]
ANN ARBOR

A

6.

:VII. No. 6

f

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1916.

PRICE FPI

VII. No. 6. 4

a I

RICE INAUGURATES
TOORROW NIGHT
DETROIT CLERGYMAN 1TO DELIV-
ER ADDRESS IN METHO-
DIST .CHURCH.
IS GRADUATE OF MICHIGAN
Speaker Secured for Every Evening
This Week by W. B.
Moore.-
Dr. Rice will speak at the Metho-
dist church at 7:15 o'clock tomorrow
evening, inaugurating the series of
talks he will give each evening during
the coming week in the interest of
the University Y. M. C. A.
The services of the eminent Detroit
clergyman were secured by Whitley B.
Moore, '18, chairman of the religious
meetings, and the news of his coming
will be welcome to the hundreds that
heard his famous "pep" mass meeting
in the fall of 1914. Dr. Rice is a great
favorite with all %college audiences
who have heard him. He is also con-
sidered as Detroit's most popular
speaker.
Dr. Rice Is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Michigan Law School and
is. very influential in Detroit business
circles. In fact, the Detroit Chamber
of Commerce postponed its popular
cruise one week to accommodate him
after having extensively advertised the
cruise for a previous date.
There is no doubt that Dr. Rice will
please his audiences here as he has
pleased them elsewhere. The success
of- the Detroit "Y" meetings was due
mainly to him and he will undoubt-
edly give M. C. A. work a big "boost"
in Ann Arbor.
RUSSINS ADVANCE ON
fRONT TOWARD LEMBERG
Slavs Gain Austro-German Positions
in District Southeast of Ga-
lalcian Capital.
Petrograd, Oct. 7.-Russian troops
have made headway on the Galician
front in their campaign for Lemberg,
according to today's war announce-
ment, capturing Austro-German posi-
tions in the district south of Brzezany,
southeast of the Galician capital.
Counter attacks are holding up the
Russian offensive along the line to the
north. The statement reads:
In the direction of Zochoff, forty
miles east of Lemberg, in the re-
gion of Peniaki, south of Brody,
Gukolavoe, and Mlynovce, fierce
battles are proceeding. The en-
emy is obstinately resisting our of-
fensive by making counter attacks.
We took prisoner fifteen officers,
two surgeons, and 522 men.
In the region south of Brzezany
our troops captured some enemy
positions and afterwards repell-
ed several attacks by Germano-
Turkish troops.
German Official Statement
Berlin; Oct. 7.-The fierce Russian
assault on the German lines in Vol-
hynla, west of Lutsk has died down,
says today's war office announcement.
On the front northeast of Lemberg,
now, the RussIans 'are more active.
The communication follows:
Army group of Prince Leopold-
On the front west of Lutsk yester-

day the exhausted enemy was
quiet. In this region we have cap-
tured in the last few days six of-
ficers, 622 men, and eight machine
guns.
Between the Brody and the
Zborow railway lines leading to
Lemberg there was a revival of
activity. After a strong prepara-
tory fire the enemy made repeated
and powerful attacks near Wy-
socko, Dubie, and Zarkow. The
attack broke down under our fire.
Army group of Gen. von Both-
mer-The Russians resumed fight-
ing on both sides of the Ziita Lipa
(southeast of Lemberg). German-
Austro-Hungarian, and Turkish
Troops, by their stubborn resist-
ance on every occasion, broke the
frequent storming attacks. The
enemy penetrated our lines at is-
olated points, but was driven back

October 13 to
21e Angell Day
According to a bulletin published by
the state department of public instruc-
tion Friday, October 13, has been des-
ignated as Angell day. The state will
pay tribute to her great educator
through the school system with which
he was for so long connected. It is
the plan of the department to have ex-
ercises fitting to the memory of Michi-
gan's late president held in all the
public schools and colleges of the
state on this day.
Dr. C. X.,Cobern
SpeaksTonight
To Give Lecture Under Auspices of
Wesleyan Guild at Metho-
dist Church.
The first of a series of five lectures
to be given under the auspices of the
Wesleyan Guild of the Methodist
church will be heard tonight when Dr.
Camden M. Cobern will speak at 7:30
o'clock in the Methodist church. Dr.
Cobern is professor of the English
Bible and the Philosophy of Religion
at Allegheny college.
BOYS' CONFERENCE TO BE HELD
AT LANSING IN DECEMBE
Eighteen hundred older boys from
every section of the state of Michigan
will attend the 14th Annual State Boys'
Conference which is to be held at
Lansing, December 1st, 2nd and 3rd.
Several speakers of national reputa-
tion such as: Chas. D. Hurrey, stu-
dent secretary of the international
committee; Mr. Branch Rickey, vice
president of the St. Louis-Americans,
formerly coach at the University of
Michigan; Mr. J. M. Artman, dean of
boys' work in the Chicago Training
school; Dr. Alan Stockdale, the "Pitch-
ing Parson" of Toledo, and Dinnie Up-
ton, the football coach of Grand Rap-
ids, are already scheduled to be pres-
ent and other speakers of national
reputation have been invited. Several
high school bands will be in attendance
in addition to the M. A. C., Industrial
School and the Re6 bands of Lansing.
The purpose of this annual confer-
ence is to bring together the older
boys from all parts of the state rep-
resenting church groups, Sunday
school classes, Y. M. C. A. groups,
high school classes and clubs, Young
People's societies and Boy Scout or-
ganizations to discuss their life prob-
lems.-
UPPER ROOM BIBLE CLASS
HOLDS ITS FIRST MEETING
"Once an Upper Room Man, always
an Upper Room Man," is the slogan
of the Upper Room Bible Class which
held its first meeting last evening at
7:00 o'clock, in the Bible Chair House,
444 South State street.
"Look after the first year men par-
ticularly," asks Mr. Iden, class leader,
of the old members. "Bring some new
men with you. We shall count on 25
new members at next. week's meeting.
Last year we numbered over 300 and
this year we must pass the 400 mark."
These meetings lasting from 7:00 to
8:00 o'clock, Saturday evenings, have
been successful in the past. The Bible
Chair..House has a total enrollment of
5,000 men since organization 25 years
ago.

GERMANU-BRAT53
REACH ES NEWPOT
WITH DISPTCHES
SUBMARINE TAKES 17 DAYS TO
CROSS OCEAN FROM WIL-
HELMSHAVEN.
SUBMERSIBLE STARTS BACK
Lieut. Rose, Commander, Denies
Knowledge of Dispatches for
von Bernstorff.
Newport, R. I., Oct. 7.-A grim Ger-
man fighting submarine, the U-53,
came into the harbor here this after-
noon. It was believed to have left
important confidential mail for Am-
bassador Bernstorff, and it slipped out
early this evening again to run the
allied gauntlet.
Her voyage across the Atlantic was
the first time in history that a Eu-
ropean fighting submersible had jour-
neyed to American shores. Her com-
mander, Lieutenant Rose, swept past
the allied blockade, consuming 17 days
on his voyage from Wilhelmshaven,
stayed in port three hours and then
bade America goodbye.
His mission, he said, was solely to
deliver mail, but he professed not to
know the nature thereof. The subma-
rine needed no supplies when she came
into this port. Hidden inside her was
sufficient food and oil for three
months. There was no effort to con-
ceal the fact that the vessel was a
fighter, rather than a peaceful freight-
er like the Deutschland which recently
brought a cargo of dyestuffs to this
country. Upon leaving Lieutenant
Rose said he was going outside the
harbor and remain there for the pres-
ent. This was taken by naval men to
mean he would stay long enough to be
sure that his path was clear so that he
could get away as readily as did the
Deutschland from Norfolk. In this
connection they pointed out that naval
strategy teaches that a sufficient force
can pick up a submarine anywhere
within a range of 200 miles. Allied
ships, however, are not believed to be
off shore in any numbers.
OLYMPIC CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES
CLOSE AT INDIANAPOLIS MEET
Indianapolis, Oct. 4.-Olympic games
and athletic contests for centenial
championship medals is the last day's
program of the first week of Indiana's
observance of a century of statehood.
The contests are divided into three
classes, senior for college, junior for
high school boys and a third for high
school athletes, members of the In-
diana Athletic association. More than
250 athletes are entered in the events.
Gov. Ralston is to award the medals.

A Word from the President
My attention has been called to the fact, that on several c ". ic u , since
the opening of the University, disturbances have. occurs ((d upon the
streets of the city and elsewhere, due to the thout htiess
enthusiasm of some of the members of the lower classes. :While the
University authorities recognize and favor regulated contests between
classes, they cannot permit anything that disturbs the public peace or that
is in any respect in the nature of "hazing."
That which is apparently innocent amusement in the beginning not
infrequently, because not regulated, degenerates into riotous conduct that
brings disgrace upon the University and results in severe disciplinary
measures. The good name of the University so generously supported by
the people of the state for the benefit of those who come here for an edu-
cation, is largely in the keeping of the students. All should remember this
and on all occasions avoid conduct that will provoke unfavorable com-
i
ment.
Because of the consequences that will inevitably come from a continu-
ance of the disturbances to which I refer, I must request that they
cease at once and that class enthusiasm manifest itself hereafter only
throught the contests regulated by the student council.
H. B. HUTCHINS,
October 7, 1916. President. .

WILSON BAPS F IN fIEBY SPE TO 2

II

DECLARES

REPUBLICAN I

HAS "EVERY UGLY "Fl
OF HATE."
INFERS T. R. ACTUAL

I

BRYAN TO SPEAKFU RSOT2
State Campaign Committee Secures
Noted Orator for Sunday
Evening Address

RUSSIANS ATTACK
TEUTONSIN WEST
Heavy Force Landed in Dobrujda At-
tacks Right Wing of Germans
Under von Mackensen.

COLISEUM SECURED FOR TALK ROUMANIANS ATTACK BULGARIA

William Jennings Bryan will appear
here Sunday evening October 22, in
the Coliseum under the auspices of the
Washtenaw dry committee, having been
secured for campaign work in Michi-
gan through the state dry committee.
Mr. Bryan will come to Ann Arbor
after speaking in Toledo Sunday morn-
ing and in Adrain Sunday afternoon.
Bryan's work for prohibition in var-
ious states which have voted upon the
ammendment to their constitution has
met with the greatest results, and it
is in the hopes of sweeping aside the
objections to the proposed law by his
matchless eloquence and logic, that
the great Commoner has been secured
for the state campaign. It is the be-
lief of the local committee that his
work will result in a dry state if he is
anywhere as near successful as he was
in Ohio.
Arrangements are now being made
to secure the Coliseum, where "Billy"
Sunday will speak the following Mon-
day morning, for Bryan's address, for
the crowds which have always turn-
ed out to hear the former Secretary
of State have invariably been too large
to be accommodated in Hill auditor-
ium. The Coliseum will seat 10,000
people, and is by far the largest avail,
able building.
The coming of Mr. Bryan so shortly
before Mr. Sunday appears will bring
closely together the two best "drawing
cards upon the platform today and will
enable Michigan students to hear on
successive days the two most effective
speakers able to be secured.

London, Oct. 7.--Smashing with
heavy hammer blows, the Russo-Rou-
manians are attempting to drive Von
Mackensen's German-Bulgar-Turkish
army out of Dobrud3a, by a swift turn-
ing movement. A large Russian force
landed at the Roumanian port of Con-
stantza, joined the forces operating
along the Danube and launched a sud-
den attack against von Mackensen's
right wing.
The Russian war office announced
the capture of two villages and sur-
rounding heights. The Roumanian
war office tonight reported the cap-
ture of more German trenches in the
same region. London military men
are awaiting with tense interest the
outcome of the great battle now rag-
ing in Dobrudja.
Striking at von Mackensen's right
flank the Russians and Roumanians
are striving to bend in this wing, press
the Teuton forces back against. the
Black Sea, and force the evacuation
of Dobrud ja by the threat of envelop-
ment and capture.
An unconfirmed Ronne wireless dis-
patch this afternoon declared that a
new Roumanian force had crossed the
Danube for a fresh invasion of Bul-
garia, presumably as a part of the
turning campaign. In all theaters of
war the allies are now on the of-
fensive.
Bankers Discredit German Reports
New York, Oct. 7.-Leading bank-
ers here have shown an inclination to
doubt the reports received yesterday'
to the effect that messages were be-
ing brought from the Kaiser to the
American government by Ambassador
Gerard.
31. C. Robber Caught in St. Louis
Detroit, Mich., Oct. 7.-James A.
Medsker, one of the three highwaymen
who held up the fast M. C. mail train
near Dearborn on Sept. 27 was cap-
Lured in St. Louis after a carefully
planned campaign.

...............
Audience, Composed of DemoCrA,
Progressives and Iudependent9p
Cheers Constantly.
(By Robert J. Bender, United Pit
Staff Correspondent.)
Ashbury Park, N. J., 1Dct 7.--$l
through "with every ' form of bitti
ness, every ugly form of hate a
every debased purpose of reveng
the Republican party, President w
son declared today in one of hie S
urday afternoon speeches, Is works
with a "covert desire to receiver si
ret power." It has drawn no diagraa
of what will be its national policy.
"It has only -questioned everyli.
of that pursued .by the administl
tion," he said. The President's a
dress, delivered with 'repeated 01
bursts of scorn and 'humor, kept
crowd of 2,500 Democrats, Progr4
sives and Independents, in a conste
fit of cheering. Wilson obviously 1y.
feeling good as a result of the recd
tion tended him on his recent veste
trip.
"On one hand," he said, "is a pal
united, which has determined its ''
rection by its performances, not
its promises."
The President plainly stated, thou
not mentioning the Colonel's nazi
that Theodore Roosevelt was the "rt
leader of the Republican party a
that his counsel would 'guide the,4
vision of a large part of it, should
succeed In. November.
"If I were leader of that party;
would, be afraid to get elected;" t
President declared. "I would " kM
that nothing 'but disappolutme
awaited' me, because oddly enougli .t
only distinct definition of pu'rpa
comes from the collateral branches'
the family. The only articulate voi
professes opinions and proposes it'
which the rest In private shiver a
demur. When the whole country,
clamoring for definition It is legitims
to take it where you can get it,- a
the definitions are backed by certs
things that have already happened'
opr policy.
"One branch of ,the party,-the ei
lateral branch to which I have , Ja
referred, backed as a candidate i
the United States Senate in the Sit
of New York, a man whose avow
position in respect to international";
fairs was unneutral, and whose int(
'tion was, if he became a member'.
that great council upon internatim
affairs at Washington, to promote I
Interests cif one side of the press
sear in Europe.
"Therefore, we are warranted In l
lieving that If the Republican pa
should succeed, one very large brat
of it would insist upon what its leaf
has insisted upon: a complete reVer,
of policy, and in view of the snipi
of the candidate I have referred'
recently, that reversal of policy ;;t
only be a reversal from peace to vw
DEAN VAUGHAN. TALIKS TD
:1dndsslon to Rill Auditorium Free
All University Students
"General Eugenics" will be the s=
ject of Dean Vaughan's address in f
auditorium at 3:00 o'clock this aft
noon. It was first intended to hold'
talk in some smaller place, but wl
it became apparent that a large a
ence was assured, Hill anditorlum''S
selected.
The address is to be given und Or
auspices of the University Y. M.
The subject matter-will be some gen
al facts in eugenics that all shy
know. Admission is free and eve
body is welcome, especially univen
men.

HARP E ti'S PAPER AGAIN
SUPPRESSED IN BERT
Berlin, Oct. 7.-Die Zukunft,
which Maximilian Harden is the E
tor, has again ┬░been suppressed, apr
ently because of an anti-militarist
ticle, the contributor of which pictu
the horrible side of the war.

i
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Divison Sts.
10:30 A. M. Sermon by Leonard A. Barrett, Theme: A
Moral Fairyland.
itl11li
6:30 P. M. Prof. W. D. Henderson speaks to Young
People.
7:30 P. M. Address by Mrs. Mary J. Gildersleeve,,
Theme: Patriotism that counts.

1= 1

FIRST

METHODIST

CHURCH

FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY SERVICES, 1866---1916

REV. E. S. NINDE, D. D.,
Pastor of Mathewson Street M. E. Church,
Providence, R. I.
"THE GREATNESS OF MAN"
10:30 A. M.

REV. Q M COHERN, LIM D.,
Professor of English Bible and Philosophy of Religion
In Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa.
FIRST WESLEYAI GUILD LECTURE
?:30 P. M.

i
Y "YELLOW AND BLUE"

lk2v

Sermon by Mr. Douglas at 10:30

..........___....

-n

MA

TT

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