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January 24, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
WAlIRER-PROBABLY
SNOW

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UNITE

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D PRESS

DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

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VOL. XXVIL No. 85. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 1917 PRICE FIVE CENTS

- - - -

_ _

SOUTH ATLANTiC
RASIDERVAISHS
German Vessel Which Played Havoc
Off South American Coast
Disappears
APPEARANCE IN ANOTHER
PART OF WORLD PREDICTED
Report That Teuton Ship Sunk by
British Cruiser Glasgow
Discredited
By Charles P. Stewart
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Buenos Aires, Jan. 23.-The German.
raider has apparently disappeared just
as mysteriously as she arrived in the
South Atlantic. Her next appearance
in some far distant part of the world
heralded by another "drive" on allied
shipping, was today predicted as the
next word to be heard from the rover.
Rumor that the British cruiser Glas-
gow had ;unk the raider was entirely
discredited today. Efforts to trace the
source of the rumor were fruitless,
but it was certain it had not been
based on any definite information.
In the meantime, the newspaper
Standard today published an uncon-
firmed rumor that a submarine, pre-
sumably a German, had stopped the
Spanish steamer Reina Victoria Eu-
genia yesterday evening at the mouth
of the River Plata. According to this
report, the steamer's papers were ex-
amined and she was finally permitted
to proceed.
Berlin, Jan. 23.-Repulse of British
detachments advancing against Ger-
man positions northwest of Fromelles
and a successful reconnoitering raid
by Bavarian regiments northeast of
Armentieres, were reported in today's
official statement. The Bavarians
brought prisoners and machine guns
back after entering the enemy
trenches. Elsewhere on the western
front a haze hampered artillery and
flyer activity.
Berlin, Jar. 23.-Capture of 100 pris-
oners in an engagement against Russo-
Roumanian forces between the Slamic
apd Putna valleys, and pushing back
of the enemy forces was announced in
today's official statement.
Grand Rapids, Mich., Jan. 23.-Al-
bert Braun was found not guilty of
violating the Mann white slave act by
a jury in United States district court
today. Braun was judged with il-
legally transporting Elsie Hummell,
19, whose home was at 845 Wolford
street, Chicago, to Muskegon, Mich.,
for immoral purposes.
London, Jan. 23.-Sixty-nine persons
were killed, 72 seriously injured and
328 slightly hurt in the explosion of an
ammunitions plant "in the neighbor-
hood of London" last Friday, accord-
ing to official figures issued today.
This, it was said, was believed to be
a complete list of casualties.
Washington, Jan. 23.-A federal steel
plant to supply wholly or in part the
needs of the United States navy is
"under consideration' by the navy de-
partment, Secretary of the Navy
Daniels said to the United Press to-
day. Recent pronounced underbidding
of American steel plants by an English
firm for the supply of armor piercing
projectiles is understood to have im-

pressed the department with the need
for a federal steel plant.
S'Grazenhlage, Holland, Jan. 23,-The
trawler Eems has brought into Ymu-
den, harbor seriously wounded Ger-
man sailors from the destroyer V-69
which was damaged in the naval bat-
tle off the Flemish coast. The de-
stroyer itself was later towed into
port.

Good Night! Our
Time 's Up, Dear
How long did it take Pyramus to
bid his Thisbe "good night"?
How long did Troilus lean upon
Cressida's front gate and murmur
sweet nothings 'neath the opalescent
moon?
The women of Barnard college
would like to know. They are certain
that no famous lover in history ever
bade "Sleep kill those pretty eyes,
etc.," within the short space of 15 min-
utes. Yet the cruel faculty of the fa-
mous school has drawn up a sort of
time table, and the students are ex-
pected to live and love on schedule.
The hardest rule is:
"Callers must go at 10:30; 15 min-.
utes extra for 'good night' in the re-
ception hall."
Pershing Column
to Quit Mexico
Return of Ambassador Fletcher Still
Uncertain; Government to Pro-
vide Employment for Men
Washington, Jan. 23.-Withdrawal of
General Pershing's troops from Mexico
is under way. The outposts have al-
ready been drawn in and the general
movement northward toward the bor-
der will follow immediately, it was of-
ficially learned today. The last chap-
ters of the American expedition to get
Villa is being written. Villa is still
at large. It was learned officially that
no definite date has been set for send-
ing Ambassador Fletcher to Mexico
City.
The United States employment bu-
reau today announced that it had com-
pleted plans for the war department
to obtain employment for national
guardsmen returning from the border
who may be out of work. Large num-
bers of the guardsmen recently ordered
home are known to face unemployment
on their return as a result of enlisting
in the guard. The government, it was
said, feels a certain responsibility for
this, and has consequently agreed to
assist.
ryan Scores
Tenets of Note
Says Tenor of Note Out of Sympathy
With Interests of Ameri-
ican People
Madison, Wis., Jan. 23.-"A wonder-
fully eloquent appeal to the nations at
war," is the phrase used by William
Jennings Bryan, former secretary of
state, commenting here today on Presi-
dent Will-en's speech to the senate.
"But I dissent entirely," Bryan said,
"from the proposition that this nation
should 4oin in the enforcement of
peace in Europe. If I know the senti-
ment of the American people, it is un-
conceiveable that they should be will,
ing to put the American army and
navy at the command of an interna-
tional council which would necessarily
be controlled by European nations, and
allow that council to decide for us
when we would go to war. Such an
agreement, in my judgment, would im-
peril European peace instead of in-
suring it, because they would see in
unlimited resources a means of ad-
vancing their own interests, with us
bearing the burden."

Bandits Killed in Auto Accident
St. Louis, Mo., Jan. 23.-Harry
Walsh and William Beckman, two of a
party of five automobile bandits who
attempted early Sunday morning to
rob a store at Florissant, a suburb,
were killed when a stolen automobile
in which three of them were riding
crashed through the rail of a bridge
and fell 15 feet into a ravine.

HUSH BLACK TO 'BE
SPEAKR HIN JUNE
Will Deliver Baccalaureate Address
Loring Commencement
Week
TALKS ON EVENING OF
JUNE TWENTY-FOURTH
Is Professor in Union Theological
Seminary in New York
City

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Hutchins Leaves
for Eastern Trip
President to Attend Various Alumni
and Alumnae Meetings Dur.
ing Week
President Harry B. Hutchins left
the city yesterday afternoon for a
week's trip in the east, during which
he will attend a number of annual
gatherings by alumni associations.
The president will first, however, at-
tend a meeting of the executive com-
mittee of the Association of Amer-
ican Universities, to be held this aft-
ernoon in New York City, at the Cen-
tury club.
Tomorrow afternoon the president
will be the guest of honor at the an-
nual meeting of the Collegiate Alum-
nae association of Washington, D. C.,
and will attend the annual meeting
of the Washington alumni the same
night.
From Washington President Hutch-
ins will return to New York City,
where on Friday night he will attend
the annual banquet of the New York
alumni association. Saturday after-
noon he will be called on to address
the Daughters of Michigan of New
York at their annual gathering.
The president will return to Ann
Arbor the first part of next week.
He will be accompanied on his trip by
Mrs. Hutchins.

The Reverend Hugh Black has beent
secured by the University to deliver
the baccalaureate address during the
coming June commencement week. Hei
will speak on the evening of June 24.
The Rev. Mr. Black was born in {
Rothesay, Scotland, in 1868. He studiedi
at the University of Cidgow and took
his master's degree at Free Church,
college in Glasgow, where he studiedt
from 1887 to 1891. He subsequently
took his D. D. degree and was ordained
minister of Sherwood church, in
Paisley, Scotland, where he served till
1891, then becoming head of St.
George's United Free church in Edin-
burgh.
He came to the United States in 1986,
and the same year was made professor
of practical theology in the Union
Theological seminary of New York
City, which position he still holds.
While in this country Professor Black
has studied at both Yale and Prince-
ton in their divinity schools.
Professor Black is the author of a
number of monographs and books,
among which are "The Dream of
Youth," "Friendship," "The Practice
of Self-Culture," "The Gift of In-
fluence," and "Three Dreams."
Yerkes to Speak
This Afternoon
Harvard Professor to Talk on Psycho-
logical Subject i Tap.
pan Hall
Harold M. Yerkes, of Harvard, who
is to speak in Tappan hall at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon, claims that the
Binet tests for mental deficiency are
unscientific and with his own point
scale, which is being tried out, has
been one of the most effective opPen
ents of the old tests.
Material for Profssor Ycrkes' sys-
tem has been compiled not only from
his wide technical trainin, but also
from much hospital experience in psy-
chopathic wards.
Professor Yerkes has just returned
from several months' residence in Cal-
ifognia, where he has been observing
the life and habits of monkeys, and
has published a book on "The MVI ntal
Life of Apes.'"
The subject of the address this aft-
ernoon will be "Psychological Eham-
ining in Relation to Education."
Kenosha 'Drys' Steal March on 'Wets'
Kenosha, Wis., Jan. 23.-In an effort
to beat the Wisconsin legislature to
it-; the prohibition supporters of Ke-
nosha Saturday surprised the saloon
men by taking out petitions to demand
the submission of the license question
to a referendum at the coming city
election.

* * * ** * * * * * * * *
*CITY HEALTH OFFICER
* SAYS WATER IS PURE *
* In spite of the rumor on the *
* campus yesterday that the city *
* water was unsafe for drinking pur- *
* poses, Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city *
* health officer, issued a statement *
* last evening that the water is un- *
* contaminated and fit to be used *
* without boiling. *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
TOGIVEPLAY TOMORROW
WILL PRESENT IBSEN'S "PILLARS
OF SOCIETY" IN
U-HALL
Heralded as the most ambitious and
auspicious effort that the Oratorical
association has yet attempted, "Pil-
lars of Society," a powerful social
drama by Henrik Ibsen, will give the'
campus an opportunity of viewing one
of this foremost dramatist's earlier
and most characteristic productions,
when the play is presented at 8 o'clock
tomorrow night in the -auditorium of
University hall.
The scene of the play is laid in one
of the smaller coast towns of Norway
and the action takes place in the home
of Karsten Bernick, the wealthy ship
builder, who is the central "pillar of
society," as Ibsen has ironically char-
acterized him.
The role of Bernick is taken very
ably by J. C. Cary, '19, and the part
of Mrs. Bernick is carried by E. Louise
Robson, grad. Miss Robson has had
much experience in campus and other
dramatics, having lately had charge of
the production of "The Merchant of
Venice," given by the local high school.
Thirty people are included in the
cast, and there are 17 speaking parts.
Tbs L productlon *"is year is being
undert'.ken on a credit basis, all of
the members of the cast securing cred-
it for their work. Michigan is one of
the first universities to use this meth-
od of enlisting and securing more than
an ordinary interest in college dra-
matics.
"Pillars of Society" is the only
drama that will be presented upon the
campus this semester, the Comedy
club having been unable to decide
upon a play. The management of the
production has been under the direc-
tion of Prof. R. D. T. Hollister and
Mr. Louis Eich of the oratory depart-
ment.
All seats have been reserved at
prices of 25, 35 and 50 cents. Tickets
are on sale at Wahr's book store.
HOLD FRESH LIT
ASSEMBLY 'lDAY

NOTE IS
SAYS

IDEALISTIC
FRENCH PRESS

CRITICISE' "6HIGH SEAS"1
PHRASE IN WILSON NOTE
FOREIGN DIPLOMATS QUESTION
PRACTICABILITY OF SUG-
GESTION
By J. P. YOPER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washingtoi 3r 23. ai literal
working out of the president's sug-
gestions regarding "a direct outlet to
the great highways of the seas" for
all nations would mean complete neu-
tralization of the Panama, Suez and
Kiel canals as well as neutralization
of Gibraltar and the Dardenelles is the
interpretation by British, German and
neutral officials here today. This in-
terpretation mentioned constitutes a
synmposiuin of expressions of opinion
by belligerent and neutral officials.
As to just what the president meant
wvhen he declared, "No nations need
be shut away from free access to the
open paths of the world's commerce,"
in his address to the senate yester--
day, all diplomats questioned held
strictly to their rigid rule that they
should not be quoted. Some, especially
ti-ose who represent landlocked na-'
ti )ns, said naturally their home gov-
ernments would favor such a program.
Among the foreign officials who dis-
cussed this phase of the president's ad-
dress were German, British, French,
SDanish, and South American officials.
Until President Wilson is able to tell
England he has the authority of con-
gi ess to use the armed forces of this
co :try in his own initiative in the
interest of world peace, England is
unlikely to make any concessions of
power which would, render her easier
of attack than she was before the pres-
ent war. This was the best answer
obtainable in British circles here to-
day to the whole of President Wilson's
address.

BRITISH EDITORS
NONCOMMITTAL
ON WILS.ON NOTE
"PEACE WITHOUT VICTORY" ONLY
LOOPHOLE FOR BRITON
ATTACK

Persuasion in Domain of Theory Is
General French Criticism
of Message
By ED. L. KEEN
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
London, Jan. 23.-Mindful of the
error into which they were drawn on
President Wilson's peace note by over-
hastiness, British editors were today
generally cautious in their attempts to
analyze and interpret the president's
speech in the senate. They evidently
feared a possible misconstruction of
his remarks. Most of the comment,
however, hinged on the American exe-
cutive's use of the term "peace with-
out victory."
The papers owned by Lord North-
clice insisted that there cannot be a
drawn war with the spirit with which
the allies are animated on the one
side, and on the other, the spirit of
Prussian militarism. The general im-
pression, among both press and pub-
lic, seems to be that the speech was
intended neither pro-ally nor pro-Ger-
man, but rather pro-American, de-
signed primarily for American con-
sumption. The Pall Mall Gazette ex-
pressed no doubt of Wilson's "disin-
terestedness and high mindedness, but
only regrets the exercise of these qual-
ities in a purely theoretical afmos-
phere."
Allies' Victory Essential.
"Victory for the allies," the news-
paper continued, "is the first essential.
After that, we can talk about perman-
ent suppression of war at our leisure."
The Times editorial today illustrated
the desire of British editors to "go
slow" in commenting on the Wilson
speech. "Its language," the editorial
said, "has evidently been weighed with
so much nicety and care that prema-
ture comment might overlook or mis-
construct the precise shade of mean-
ing which particular passages are in-
tended to bear. The president's pro-
ject is nothing less ambitious, less
splendid than the establishment of a
perpetual . and universal reign of
peace."

1
r,
r
3

Dean Effinger and Dr. Cummings
Speak on "A Sound Mind in a
Sound Body"

to

Dean J. R. Effinger and Dr. H. H.
Cummings of the health service will be
the two speakers on the program for
the third fresh lit assembly this after-
noon at 4 o'clock in the auditorium
of the Natural Science building.
An innovation will be introduced in
the speaking, as both speakers will
take different parts of the same gen-
eral subject for topics. The general
title of the two speeches will be "A
Sound Mind in a Sound Body." Dean
Effinger will spea'k on "A Sound Mind"
and Dr. Cummings will take for his
subject, "A Sound Body." As this is
the last chance for the first year class
to get together for several weeks, ow-

London Globe Comment Bitter.
The most bitter editorial was that
in the London Globe. "You have read
us a homily on peace without victory,'
it said, addressing the editorial to the
president, "while the world's greatest
criminal goes unpunished in his crime.
What have you done, sir, for the cause
of justice, humanity, rights of the weak
and the honor of the strong to pre-
sume to school us in the mighty con-
flict from which you have carefully
held aloof? Remember the stern words
of that glorious Illinois farmer (re-
ferring to Lincoln), who bade Eu-
ropeans 'keep hands off his sacred task
and keep your hands from ours."
(Continued on Page Six.)
BREAKS LEG IN GYM
R. C. Greenwald, '20, Sustains Frac-
ture While Exercising on Mats
While exercising on the mats at Wa-

0 , n nw san B oa ,,

1

iI

Y. W. C. A. Vespers
speaks on
Thbery, pHa' of Iq30Tmryr
Newberry H all 5=5:3O Tomorrow

ing to exams and the J-hop, all mem- terman gymnasium yesterday after
bers of the class are expected to be noon, Robert C. Greenwald of Toledo
present. 0., and a freshman in the engineer
ing department sustained a broken leg
Allotments of Sugar for Fren h . The limb was fractured just above thf
Paris, Jan. 23.-Sugar cards are to ankle. Greenwald was rushed im-
be instituted in France. Their inti o- mediately to the health service, an<
duction in Paris and the departient of removed shortly after to the Univer
the Seine will be accomranied by a sity hospital, where the injured liml
census taking, with a view of making was set. He was reported resting com
the measure effectual. fortably at a late hour last night.

''p ________________

IBSEN'S GEAT PLAY

Tickets now
Wahr's

All Seats
Reserved

i i I

b-

lety"

Presented by the Oratorical Association

25c
35c
50c

UNIVERSITY HALL

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