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January 23, 1917 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4.

iIUI\ dUIILVULL
PLEASES FARELL

Steve Believes Varsity Cinder Path
Program Is Best That Miich-
igan Has Had
COACH IS GREETED BY BIG
TURNOUT qF TRACK ATHLETES
Attention Is Centered Upon Coming
Indoor Struggle Against Notre
Dame Squad
"The best schedule Michigan has
ever had," was the expression of Coach
Farrell yesterday respecting the 1917
track program announced Sunday.
From the number of men, both fresh-
men and Varsity aspirants who ap-
peared yesterday, the same opinion
must be prevalent. All afternoon the
coach was busy putting tracksters of
all kinds through their paces in the
largest single day's turnout the coach
has had this season. Nearly every
athlete who has become identified with
track proceedings to date was pres-
ent.
Following the schedule announce-
ment, the athletes can see just how
short a time it is before the opening
assignment with Notre Dame's choic-
est, down on the program for Feb. 17.
Possibly the reason for the large turn-
out can be assigned to the proximity
of the first engagement, and to the
quality of the meets which the Wol-
verines have booked.
Carroll Does Fast Mile.
Farrell is not speeding up his ath-
letes yet to. any marked degree, al-
though several of the men have made
fast time for so early in the season.
Steve clocked Carroll the full ten laps
this morning in 4:38 and Fontanna
has done the quarter in close to 55 sec-
onds. It is unlikely that Carroll will
be sent at 4 much faster pace until
the time for the Catholic duel, as it is
well known what he can do. Others
whose ability on the Varsity is well
known will likewise be allowed to take
things easy for some time, and the
coach may extend this system to every-
one out except the men in the field
events.
Wateh Catholics Saturday.
An idea as to the strength of Notre
Dame will be secured by the coach
Sunday as the Catholics have a meet
in Chicago Saturday night. The meas-
ure of preparedness necessary to make
a Michigan showing in the opening
meet of the Wolverine season can be
obtained from the reports on this
meeting.
Many of the athletes will work in
the gym during examinations this
year, owing to the fact that Michigan's
date with the Catholics is during the
first week of the second semester.
HARVARD VARSITY FOOTBALL
AGGREGATION STARTS WORK
Members Who Will Compete for Jobs
Next Fall Begin Winter Train-
ing in Gym
Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 22.-Harvard
is taking its football seriously this
winter despite official denials. The first
movement in the campaign for 1917
was started when Coach Haughton and
Manager Robb joined in sending a let-
ter to every prospective candidate for
the eleven next fall, asking each man
to study hard for the approaching mid-
year examinations. I order not to
forget to do so, they advised the candi-
dates that the letter be hung over
their study desks, and also be held for
Manager Robb, who is to collect them
all after the examinations and com-
pare the number he receives to the
numbersent out.
Harvard is having a little winter

football for diversion. Every day in
the week, except Saturday and Sun-
day, there is work in the baseball cage
from 2 to 3 o'clock. The first practice
was held last week, with Arnold for-
w een, Tubby Clark andRalph Hadley,
and three other men including Captain
Wheeler, present.
Each candidate notified Manager
Robb of the most convenient days that
he could report in the cage and the
football manager has made plans ac-
cordingly. Any man participating in
another sport is excused from cage
work. Only the fundamentals will oc-
cupy the attention of the players dur-
ing the winter, according to Captain
Wheeler, but this will tend to have
them fit for work when spring prac-
tice is started in mid-April.
Now is. the Time to Buy Shirfs. Man-
hattan Shirt Sale at Reule-Conlin-Fie-
gel Co. Main St.
Genuine leather book covers at
great discount. Allmendinger's Music
Shon. 122 E. Liberty St. 20-tf

**** * *9 * * *
Time -7:30 o'clock.
Place:-West Physics Building.'
Purpose: - To boom an All-
Fresh track team.
Participants:-
Athletic lDirector Bartelme.
Coach Steve Farrell.
Captain Eddie Carroll.
Dr. George A. Nay.
Manager Sanders.
Beneficiaries:-All-Fresh track'
in the first instance and Varsity
track ultimately.
Every first year man is expect-
ed to be on hand and help.

*
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*
*
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*
414
*k
*t:

That a good baseball player may also
be a good golfer is being proved with
increasing frequency as more and more
ball players succumb to the lure of the
royal and ancient game in their leisure
hours.
Two names stand out when the
golfing ball players are named. One is
the veteran John Montgomery Ward,3
manager " of the Giants more than a
score of years ago, and the other is;
Arthur Shafer, who played with the
Giants only a few seasons back. Both
Ward and Shafer are amateur golfers,
having been formally reinstated by the
United States Golf association after1

fornia Golf association. He has been'
a prominent figure in recent tourneys
on the Pacific coast, although he has
been playing golf only a couple of
years.
Everybody knows that Christy Math-
ewson plays golf and does pretty well
at the game, although he is far from
being in the class with Ward and
Shafer. Chief Bender is about on a
par with Matty, although he is said to
be extremely erratic, playing well one
day and wretchedly the next.
Among the managers-not counting
Matty, who is so young a manager
that he needn't be grouped with them

Pr1e. to.1' be.% AA-.74AA nks
Mra ny Prominent liaseball Mren
rove .to b dept on Links

with similar habits are Charles Dooin,
Hans Lobert, Harry Davis, Sherwood
Magee, Jack Iapp, Jimmy Walsh, Earl
Moore, Otto Knabe, George McQuillan,
and among the veterans Adrian C. An-
son, who, like Ward and Shafer, has
been reinstated by the United States
Golf association.
Meanix to Run Hurdles for Harvard
Boston, Mass., Jan. 22.-Bill Meanix,
the former Colby athlete, will have a
chance to win an intercollegiate cham-
pionship. The former English high,

Colby and Boston A. A. athlete is bac
at Cambridge and is doing all right i
his studies.
Meanix will probably stick to th
220 low hurdle game during the sprin
outdoor season and should add greatl
to the strength of the Harvard hurdlei
Simpson Will Compete in Melrose Mee
Columbia, Mo., Jan. 22.-Rober
Simpson, the world's champion higl
hurdler, leaves here today for Nev
York City where he will compete ii
the Melrose games on Wednesday

*

Mranagers should
Not Get Letters
Prominent Cornellians Are Opposed
to Movement Giving Them
Varsity "C's."
Ithaca, N. Y., Jan. 22.-Serios op-
position to the plan to give the varsity
letter to managers of the major sport
teams at Cornell has resulted in the
postponement of decision on this point
by the athletic council, some of the
members of which are managers them-
selves. Both senior societies, Sphinx
Head and Quill and Dagger, whose
membership includes some of the most
prominent men in the senior class,
have gone on record against the pro-
posal, and the Cornell Sun, the stu-
dents' newspaper, has also attacked it.
Several years ago a movement to
give the "C" to managers was serious-
ly brought to the attention of the un-
dergraduate body. After some lively
discussion the plan was defeated, or
at least nothing came of it. This year
a more serious effort has been made,
and while those opposed to the move-
ment are not willing to concede that
the matter may go through the council,
they are more concerned about it than
they were a few years ago.
Wolverines Will
Not Play Rutgers
Rumors of Thanksgiing Day Contest
Between Two Institutions
Are Without Grounds
Reports to the effect that Michigan
and Rutgers college are negotiating
for the purpose of arranging a
Thanksgiving day football game are
without grounds. There will be no
such game this year. Whether any
such game will ever be scheduled in
the future is extremely doubtful.
It was stated on good authority that
any negotiations which at any time
had been conducted by the two insti-
tutions have long since been discon-
tinued, and that there is no possibility
of such a contest next season. The
Wolverine schedule is out and all ar-
rangements are completed for games
and the list itself is entire as it will
stand.
The present rules governing foot-
ball relations do not permit of a
Thanksgiving day game. Michigan
cannot enter into any contracts call-
ing for such a contest on that account,
if upon no other consideration. Be-
sides this factor against the Rutgers
proposition, others are evident which
'would make such an agreement rather
improbable. Michigan and Rutgers
are in no way natural rivals, either
geographically or in sentiment and
tradition. The disparity is size of the
two institutions is anofher point
against a meeting between respective
football elevens.
All of these reasons were probably
considered by the authorities in re-
fusing to schedule a game with the
eastern college, although only one, the
rule against such a contest, would be
sufficient ,to bar it from the schedule.
Major League Training Quarters
The full list of the National and
American league training quarters for
the coming spring is as follows:
National League.
Chicago at Pasadena, Cal.
New York at Marlin, Tex.
Pittsburg at Columbus, Ga.
Cincinnati at Shreveport; La.

Philadelphia at St. Petersburg, Fla.
Brooklyn at Hot Springs, Ark.
St. Louis at San Antonio, Tex.
Boston at Miami Fla.
Anerican League.
Washington at Augusta, Ga.
Boston at Hot Springs, Ark.
Chicago at Mineral Springs, Tex.
New York at Macon, Ga.
St. Louis at Palestine, Tex.
Detroit at Waxahachie, Tex.
Philadelphia at Jacksonville, Fla.
Cleveland at New Orleans, La.
0. G. Andres for shoe repairing. 222
S. State. 'Phone 1718-3. tues-eod
The Michigan Daily for service.

producing legal proof that they had yet-Connie Mack and Hugh Jennings
forsaken professional sport, and are the most ardent golfers, and John
swearing that they did not intend to | McGraw has tried to play the game
return to it at any time in the future. two or three times, with what success
Both Good Golfers. no one knows who was not with him
Both are good golfers, too, and a on those occasions.
meeting between them would be an Cobb and Collins Play.
interesting struggle. Ward plays his Two great batters who play golf and
golf in the metropolitan district, and play it as they bat-left hand-are
generally disposes of one or two of Tyrus Cobb and Eddie Collins.
the younger stars in every tournament Grover Cleveland Alexander of the
he enters. Shafer is a member of a Phillies has a habit of preparing for a
California club and is rated at five on hard ball game by indulging in a round
the handicap list of the Southern Cali- of the links, and others of lesser fame

i
t
l

br
Hitting the Hockey Pace
is smooth going for the lad of supple body and
quick decision - qualities that come from
proper food and the right kind of habits. A
daily diet of
Shredded Wheat
makes a man ready for every test that calls
for physical endurance or mental alertness.
It contains all the muscle - building, brain -
making material in the whole wheat grain
made deliciously appetizing and digestible by
steam-cooking, shredding and baking. It is
the favorite food of students and ,athletes. It
is on the training table of nearly every college
in the United States and Canada. When
served with milk or cream or with fresh fruits
it is sustaining, nourishing and satisfying.

MDWIN7TER SALE

Of

t

Bostonian and Florsheim Footwear

With shoe prices soaring, and many styles costing more today
at wholesale than we are asking at retail, it would be folly to
reduce the prices of a single pair except that we are badly
overstocked on some lines; and with spring shipments soon due
to arrive we must reduce our present stock.

CAMPUS BOOTE RY %

308 So.
State St.

AL L MAND

& FORSYTHE

215 o.
Main St.

P. S.-By buying at this sale will enable you to save from
$1.00 to $2.00 per pair on your spring footwear for without a
doubt prices are going much higher.

Made only by
The Shredded Wheat Company,

Niagara Falls, N. Y.

U

_ .

Evening Clothes That
Command Respect

HE quietly correct clothes
that gentlemen want, with
no unauthorized innovations.
Experts cut these clothes; they
always fit. Rich and beauti-
flmaterials and linings.
Full dress suits are silk
lined, trimmed with silk braid.;
The style in these gar-

ments

we show

are always

faultless.

Lutz Clothing

C~~ght flrt Scbhluew & Mart

Store
Main Street

r7 M~nihiaaniimn h.-t 'JTe 1ind nif enit

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