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January 21, 1917 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-21

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EDITION
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VOL. XXVII. No. 83. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 21, 1917. PRICE FIVE C

SOUTH ATLANTIC!
RAIDS CONTINUE

Stories of Activities of Teuton Ships
and U-Boats Fill Up
Dispatches
EXPECT DEUTSCHLAND AT ANY
MOMENT IN NEW LONDON, CONN.
German Steamer, Apparently Still at
Large, Reported Headed
for North
New York, Jan. 20.-Stories of new
ships destroyed, running fights with
submersibles and other tales of the sea
poured in today while dispatches were
still bringing fresh details of the Ger-
man raid in the south Atlantic.
Every indication tonight was that in
addition to the raider German sea
forces have been extremely busy, Teu-
tonic submarines especially. In ad-
dition, all preparations have been
made at New London, Conn., again to
receive the merchant submarine
Deutschland, whose arrival is expected
momentarily.
Report Toftwood Sinks.
On the heels of the story of Captain
Jones of the steamer Lindenhall, tell-
ing of a running fight with a subma-
rine lasting two hours, came the re-
port of the sinkin of the steamer
Toftwood. The French line received a
cable from Havre announcing the de-
struction of this vessel by a submer-
sible. She carried a valuable cargo
though the line officially denied it in-
cluded munitions.
Lindenhall Gets Thrills.
The Lindenhall brought in one of
the most thrilling stories in months.
This ship was riddled and scarred from
shells fired at her by a submarine
which overhauled her in the Mediter-
ranean. This was on Dec. 13, Captain
Jones said. When ordered to stop, the
captain -crowded on full steam, un-
limbered the 12-pounder, and started
to run.
The submarine fired more than 200'
shots at his vessel, Jones said, and
the Lindenhall fired 86 in return.
Though struck repeatedly the ship was
not hit in a vital spot and made good
her get-away.
Raider Still "Flying Dutchman"
Buenos Aires, Jan. 20.-The German,
raider is apparently still at large, ac-
cording to Charles P. Stewart, United
Press staff correspondent. The most
authenticated report of her where-
abouts indicated on Thursday that she
was speeding northward with all the
might of her powerful engines. The
steam packet Bahia passed a vessel off
the northeasternmost point of South
America Thursday which slie believes
was the German raider. The stranger,
was making well over 20 knots.
The Bahia did not approach close
enough to the vessel to permit an ac-
curate description. She could not con-
firm the story of survivors landed at
Pernambuco that the German com-t
merce destroyer carried three subma-i
rines of less than 18 feet in length, ap-
parently the latest invention of Ger-
man ingenuity in subsurface warfare.,
British Captain's Description.
The British captain of the steamert
Netherby 'Hall landed among other
survivors of prizes taken by the raider,l
furnished the first detailed description1
of the raider and was the first to an-1
nounce that the terror carried subma-
rines and submarines of such small
size as to make a new era in subma-
rine development. He estimated the
length of the three undersea boats
with the raider was equipped, at about
six meters, and specified that theirt
radius of operations was comparative-
ly small, although they carried some1
sort of torpedoes, ammunition and dy-r

namite. He added that the speed of
the raider was about 22 knots.
Drina Arrives Safely.t
The pessible score of destruction ofr
the raider was reduced to 25 ships to-
night with the announcement that the
11,500 ton British ship Drina had ar-
rived safely at Rio de Janiero. The.
Drina was the biggest of all the al-
lied merchantmen reported as miss-
ing and believed to have fallen victim
to the German commerce destroyer.
That she should have eluded theI
raider was the cause of rejoicing
among among allied ship owners to-
night. The south Atlantic is being
combed from both north and south
in search of the mysterious ship.

To Chart Huron
River for Safety
Student Council Committee Plans Ac-
tion; MAp to Be Published
in Daily
The committee appointed by the stu-
dent council to investigate skating
conditions on the Huron river has de-
cided to make a chart showing the
dangerous points, air holes, thin ice,
where the nearest buildings are, where
assistance can be gotten in case of an
accident, and where there is the best
skating above Barton dam. As the ice
is not in good condition at present be-
cause of the heavy snow, the chart will
riot be made until there is good skat-.
ing on the Hdron. It will appear in
The Daily as soon. as completed.
There has been some talk among
the students who are pushing along
The Michigan Daily campaign to make
the Huron suitable for skating, of mak-
ing a skating rink above Barton dam,
where the best ice on the Huron is to
be found. A small sum would keep
the rink cleaned off and in good con-
dition.
Prizes for Opera
Poster Awarded
Bachman, '20, Winner; Second and
Third Awards Go to Steketee
and Wiener

ANN AROR GREETS
BOYS FROM FRONT
Company I of Thirty-First Regiment,
Eighty-Five Strong, Ar-
rives Home
UNIVERSITY AND CITY BAN#
ORGANIZATIONS MEET TROOPS
Crowd Awaits Arrival at Michigan
Central Station; To Hold
.Banquet
Ann Arbor opened her arms to b er
returning soldiers yesterday. From
the time that the University siren
blew, at 1:30 o'clock, announcing that
the troops had left Detroit, till 4
o'clock, when they arrived, Ann Ar-
bor's townspeople and university stu-
dents flocked to the Michigan Central
station to help welcome Company I of
the 31st regiment.
News that the troops were leaving
Detroit was telegraphed to Ann Ar-
bor, as pre-arranged. Immediately the
information reached the city hundreds
responded and in a short time had con-
gregated around the armory, whence
they marched to the Michigan Central
station, headed by the University band.
Admist cheers and laughter, the
crowd waited two hours for the troop's
train to arrive. It was afterward
found that the train had been delayed
on a side track just outside of Detroit.
Finally at about 4 o'clock the coaches
bearing the Ann Arbor and Jackson
boys rolled into the station. There
were about 85 in the Ann Arbor corps.
After much handclasping and greet-
ing, the company filed into line and,
headed by the University and city
bands, marched up Division street
through the city. All of the stores
were decorated in their honor, and
both sides of the streets were lined
with spectators.
At the armory a huge flag was raised
to salute them. Later they were dis-
missed by Captain Wilson in order to
allow them to go to their homes.
"The welcoming of the troops was
wonderful," stated Mr. John C. Fisch-
er, chairman of the welcome home
committee, last night. "The people
turned out in fine shape and I want to
thank the university students for help-
ing in the program."
A banquet will be given in thea
troop's honor next Wednesday night.
It will be held at the armory, and it
is expected that fully 1,000 people will

Call15,000 Hen
Home from South
Baker Orders More Militia Men Home
But Refuses Information About
Pershinges Column
Washington, Jan. 20.-Between 15,-
000 and 20,)000 militia men have been
ordered home from the border.
The particular units to comprise the
number are now being selected by
General Funston. Secretary of War
Baker made this announcement late
today but he declined to reveal the
plans for withdrawal of General Persh-
ing's column from Mexico.
The militia retirement bringing the
total national guard strength at the
border down to about 55,000, however,
is preliminary to the Pershing with-
drawal. Other militia units undoubted-
ly will be moved homeward as soon as
Pershing's movement is accomplished
and transportation is available.
x pect to Flay
Wilson 's Choice
President's Promotion of Grayson to
Rear Admiral May Bring Open
Attacks in .Congress
Washington, Jan. 20.-That open at.
tacks on both floors df congress will be
made on the president's promotion of
Dr. Grayson, lieutenant commander to
be a rear admiral, is certain.
Senators Smoot and Harding declar-
ed today that they will "have a thing
or two to say about the promotion of
the man who has been the president's
personal physician and friend for four
years."
An evidence of the feeling caused in
some circles by the promotion was
shown today in an editorial of Sea
Power, official cr an of the Navy
league, which has shown open hostility
for President Wilson.

*
*
*
*,
*
*
*
*

*
Berlin, via Wireless to Sayville, *
Jan. 20.-One hundred and three *
subjects of neutral nations, be- *
cause they had taken service on *
foard armed vessels hostile to Ger-
many, have been made prisoners *
of war. *
* * * * * ** * * * * ** *

** * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NEUTRAL SUBJECTS MADE
* PRISONERS BY GERMANS *

NO MORE TICKETS FOR
HOP TO BE PUT ON SALE
REASON IS THAT ONE GYMNASIULIT
WILL HOLD BUT 500
COUPLES
No more tickets will be put on sale
for the J-hop. Five hundred of the ad-
mittance cards had been sold after the
sale closed yesterday morning, at,
which the remaining 35 pasteboards
were passed out to the long waiting
students.
The above decision was made by the
J-hop committee, at a special meeting
held at the Michigan Union early yes-
terday afternoon.
According to Waldo M. McKee, 18E,
general chairman of the committee, it
will be absolutely impossible to accom-
modate any more than 500 couples in
the one gymnasium. Many rumors
have been heard around the campus
for the last few days, that the other
gymnasium would be thrown open for-
the party, but this will not be done,
according to McKee, for the reason
that all the contracts have-been award-
ed and the date is too late now to make
any new agreements.
Allotments for booths will be made
on Feb. 5, the exact hour of the day to
be decided later. Each booth will be
given two chaperone tickets, which will
cost $5.50 each, the same as the stu-
dent booth pasteboards.
There will be a regular meeting of
the committee at 10:30 o'clock this
morning at the Union.

PRISONERS CAUSI
NEW TEUTON CRI
Report That Three Americans Fel
German Hands on Captured
Ship Threats Crisis
U. S. MAKES FORMAL INQUIRY
IF NO NOTE REACHES CAPI7
Problem of "What Constitutes An
Ship" Again Takes on
Importance
By ROBERT J. BENDER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Jan. 20.-The Un
States government faces new and s
ous international problems with (
many, as a result of reports that tl
Americans have been captured
prisoners of war by the German ra:
operating in the south Atlantic.
Indications of anxiety were refl
ed when it was officially admitted
night that if Germany does not vol
teer information on the question wi1
two days, this government will
mediately make formal inquiry of (
many.
Expect Quick Reply.
The state department tonight, h
ever, expressed belief that Gern
diplomatic representatives would
mediately clear up reports that th
Americans are among prisoners abc
the steamer Yarrowdale.
Germany claims the 103 prison
taken had been removed "as pris
ers of war" because they had "ta
pay on armed enemy vessels." In
only official statement thus far isst
however, Germany has not admi1
that any of the neutrals captured
Americans.
Ship Problem Once Again.
Out of the threatened difficul
arises the old armed ship bogey wh
continues to haunt the diplomatic I
of the state department. "What c
stitutes an armed ship" is still a qi
tion between the United States, C
many and England. If the vessels
which Americans may have been E
ployed were armed unquestionably
offensive service, this governor
would have no case against Germa
EXPLOSION IN LONDON
REPORTS, EXAB6ERAT

Reed E. Bachman, 20, has been
awarded the first prize of $10 in the
Union opera poster contest. The sec-
ond, two tickets to the opera, was
given to Paul L. Steketee, '18, while
Sam G. Wiener, '19A, received the third
award of one ticket. The prizes were
awarded by a committee consisting of
Prof. L. H. Boynton, Mr. A. L. Makie-
lski, and Mr. E. H. Barnes, all of the
architectural college. -
The nature of the posters will not
be disclosed until after the opening of
the second semester, when they will
be put on display in one of the State
street book stores. The winning poster
will also appear on the cover of the
opera music.
Director Charles Morgan left for
Philadelphia Friday, where he will
conduct the rehearsals of the Mask and
Wig club of the University of Penn-
sylvania. While in the east Mr. Mor-
gan will endeavor to make satisfac-
tory arrangements for scenery for the
opera. He will return to Ann Arbor
Monday, Feb. 12, when actual work
with the chorus and cast will start.
DEFER CHOICE OF
DEBATING SQUADS
Eight Men Still in Competition for
Affirmative and Negative
Teams
Final choice of the two debating
teams which will represent Michigan
in the mid-west league debates this
year has been deferred until Tuesday,
Jan. 23. Eight men survived the try-
outs held yesterday morning, and it is
from this squad that the teams and the
two alternates will be chosen.
The men still in the contest are: S.
D. Frankel, '17L, N. D. Ireland, '18L4,
R. F. Kahle, '17, L. W. Lisle. 717L, I.
F. Massnick, '18, P. A. Miller, '17L. J.
R. Simpson, '18, and R. W. Ward, '18.
Without further tryouts the teams will
be chosen.
The question to be debated this year
in the contests with Illinois and Wis-
consin Universities is, "Resolved, That
strikes and lockouts should be pro-
hibited in public utilities and in coal
mines, prior toan investigation of the
merits of the dispute by a government-
al board." The debates will be held
March 30, Michigan meeting Wisconsin
at Madison, W-is., and Illinois coming
to Ann Arbor to debate the Michigan
affirmative team.

attend.

MAURICE L. TOULME, '14L,
WEDS HELEN -E. MAHON, '14
Word was received yesterday of the
marriage of Maurice L. Toulme, '14L,'
of Odin, Ill., to Helen E. Mahon, '14,
who formerly lived in this city. The
ceremony took place in New York City,
the couple going from there to Ot-
tumwa, Ia., where they will make their
home. Mr. Toulme, who was manag-
ing editor of The Michigan Daily in
1914, was also a member of the Sigma
Delta Chi fraternity, the Michagamua,
and the Toastmasters' club. He has

I
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ADMIRAL DEWEY IS ACCORDED
HIGHEST HONORS AT FUNERAL
President Wilson, Supreme Court
Judges and Other High Of-
ficials Present
Washington, Jan. 20.-The late ad-
miral of the navy, George Dewey, was
today accorded the highest honors the
nation could pay its dead. The presi-
dent of the United States, members of
the supreme court, almost the entire
diplomatic corps, ranking admirals and
generals of the army and navy and
lesser service officers, most of the
president's cabinet, the house and sen-
ate, gathered in the huge rotunda of
the capitol building for the impressive
funeral.
The final services were pronounced
as hoarse naval guns crashed out .a
salute of 19 discharges and muffled
drums rolled a closing "taps." The
body was temporarily placed in a
mausoleum.;

LEAK PROBE OPENS
IN NEW YORK SOON
J. P. Morgan Listed Among Men Who
Appear Before Committee in
Customs House
Washington, Jan. 20.-The house
note leak probers will resume their
hearings Tuesday in New York at a
spot within a stone's throw of Wall
street itself. Meeting in the customs
house they will delve into the Inner-
most parts of Wall street as it was
during the few days preceding the
publication of . the president's peace
note to belligerents.
The investigators will try to estab-
lish definitely whether there was a.
leak, and if so, whether some of the
money kings harvested gold in mil-
lions by advance ,information. Mrs.
Ruth Visconti, introduced to the pub-
lic by Thomas W. Lawsof, and who
promptly took the center of the stage
from him, may be a witness in New
York, or may testify here when the
committee returns. Before she is
heard, many of the prominent Wall
street financiers, including J. P. Mor-
gan, will oe examined.
Wyoming to Vote on Prohibition Bill
Cheyenne, Wyo., Jan. 20.-The peo-
ple of the state of Wyoming will vote
upon a prohibition amendment to the
state constitution in 1918. This was
assured today when Governor Ken-
drick signed the bill passed by the leg-
islature submitting the question of a
wet or dry state to a referendum vote.
The measure was the first one passed
by the state legislature this year.
Mr. and Mrs. Underdown Chaperone
Mr. and Mrs. William E. Underdown
chaperoned the Union dance last even-
ing. Albert C. Patterson, '18, chair-
man; Arthur G. Ippel, '18; Henry A.
Knowlson, '18E, and Ernst L. Maurer,
'19, served on the committee.

been employed since graduation on thes
editorial staff of the Chicago Tribune. "Y" TO CONTINUE BOOK
EXCHANGE DURING EXAMS
Lisle to Give Reading at Meeting!
At the meeting of the Students' so- The "Y" book exchange will be con-
ciety of the Unitarian church to be tinued during the semester finals. The
held at 6:30 o'clock this evening in exchange will be open in a couple of
their rooms, Leslie W. Lisle, '17L, will weeks and students desiring to ex-
give a reading of James Whitcomb change books and get the ones re-
Riley's poems and Cecil Ross, '18, quired for their new courses can find
will render a solo. them at the "Y."
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division
Services in the Church
10:30 Leonard A. Barrett speaks:
"THE GOOD SAMARITAN
6:30 Young People's Evening Service
Dr, Holden'sl1ecture announced for tonight twill be given on another date in the near
future.

OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT RI
DUCES DEATH LIST; EXACT
LOCATION UNKNOWN
London, Jan. 20.-The London tha
was jarred and brilliantly illuminate
last night by a tremendous explosio
recovered its breath tonight when th
home office announced that the mun
tions factory disaster at the' Londo
gates had resulted in far less dea
than had been expected.
Thirty or 40 bodies have been re
covered and the injured list totals 101
according to official .announcemen
The wildest rumors were current unt
the official statement appeared.
The terrific force of the explosio
was felt all over the city and in man
adjacent suburbs. In some localitie
windows were literally blown out. Th
sky was brilliantly lighted.
Hundreds and thousands of peopl
ran into the streets seeking bomb
proof cellars thinking the nois
heralded .another Zeppelin raid. Th
official statement asserted that thre
rows of houses were destroyed wit
the entire munitions plant. All of th
munitions at this spot were involve
in the explosion.
The government declared, howeve
that the disaster would have practica
ly no effect on future production e
munitions for England's armies.
The home office statement publishe
in London and permitted to be cables
did not specify where the explosion oc
curred, but it is said to have been a
the Woolwich arsenal, seven mile
southeast of London.
Swiss Reservists in 'U. S. Are Calle
Washington, Jan. 20.-Swiss Min
ister Ritter, acting on instruction
from his home government, today i
sued orders through Swiss consuls i
America that all reservists on cond
tional leave are ordered home imm<
diately.

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MAX EASTMAN
JOURNALIST AND POET
SPEAKS ON
"Feminism-Shall Women Have Free Opportunity for
Self-Expression?"
HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM

s.

January 22

Admission 25c

8:00 P. M.

Under Auspices of Michigan Forum

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