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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 20, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NewJLo -Jusvi RcIfvy
New Lot Just Received

H1

GO TO ANN ARBOR'S LEADING
COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHER
for Amateur Finishing, Copying, Enlarging Lantern
Slides etc. A complete and' fresh stock of Eastman
Kodaks and Supplies always on hand.
L ' S 719N. University Ave.

SPECIAL BARGAINS

Exactly
like cut.
All sizes
as toe.
Fit
uaranteed

Dark grown Cordovans

Also
Skate Shoes
for
Men and
Women
Maek, Tan
Tearl
$3.50 to $5

In

Writing

Paper

Hoffstetter's
Walk-Over Boot Shop
Ve can salve 5 . ain St. Skates fastened
you money 115S Mi tGratis

"

NIORS
Sit Early For Your "MICHIGANBNSIAN"
PICTURE AT
MAIN STUDIOS
1546-48 Broadway New York, N.Y
Perfect Portraitures
Unsurpassed Accomodations for
Group Photograph.
bmU'Amateur Work Handled in a Pro-
fessional Way.
619 E. Liberty St. PHONE 948-W

Not Too Late

Yet

are maintaining splendid assortments throughout our

Huron St.

WO O L E N S 118 E. Huron St

$17.00 up to $60.00
Made right on our premises

Ward's Kassy Kut Kiothes
Merchant Tailor of the Better Class

NOW PLAYING
IAJESTIC
lE MUSICAL HIT!I
tTheSi x
Little
Wives
Ilety to look and
jaugh at.
SUNDAY
Ibert Hubbard's Great Eusay
MESSAGE TO GARCIA"
p,.
HATS GOING ON
Today.
clock-Rehearsal of act one of
rs of Society," University hall.
clock-Special meeting of J-hop
ittee at Union.
clock-Rehearsal of act two of
rs of Society," University hall.
clock-Rehearsal of act three of
rs of Society," University hall.
clock-Rehearsal of act four of
rs of Society," University hall.
o'clock-Students' society of
ian church meets in society's
'clock--Meeting of the Upper
Bible class at 444 South State
lock-Council dance at :Barbour
sium.
Dock--Menorab elects officers in
rry hall. .
C-Notice.
Craftsman club will hold a
degree practice at 7:15 o'clock
t at the Masonic temple.
University band members meet'
nory, Ann street, at 2 o'clock
ternoon to take part in parade.
full uniform.
hman Glee club group picture
taken at 8:30 o'clock this morn-
White's studio.
Arbor's progressive merchant
e Michigan Daily as their adver.

POSSE KILLS THREE BANDITS
Attribute Three Oklahoma Bank Rob-
beries to Trio of Men
Okmulgae, Okla., Jan. 19.- Three
bandits, Oscar Poe, Will Hart, and
Harry Hart, were killed by a posse
headed by Sheriff C. F. Roach in a
fight 18 miles west of here today. Chief
of Police Bowman of pktnulgae, a
member of the posse, was wounded in
the hand during the battle.
Sheriff Roach and deputies left here
at midnight for the hiding place of
the three men. The bandits were sur-
rounded in a secluded spot and be-
fore they realized their danger the
fight was on. A fusilade of shots from
both sides followed and the three fug-
itives were killed. The dead men are
believed to be partners of Russell
Tucker, who was killed, and Jeff Lit-
trell, wounded and captured in yes-
terday's battle in Okjuskee county.
The gang is. accused of the Nowata,
Ninipa and Harrah bank robberies.
WA R IOVES
Petrograd, Jan. 19. - Roumanian
forces surrounded a height occupied
by German troops southwest of Pralea,
Roumania, and took "a great number"
of prisoners and four machine guns,
according to the war office statement
today. Defeat of the German forces
on both wings and evacuation by the
Teutons of Braila, Roumania, was an-
nounced.
Berlin, Jan. 19.-Russian forces, ten
times as strong as German defenders,
entered an outpost north of Krasshin
but were later ejected, today's official
statement said, describing the fighting
in the Riga theater of war. The war
office said clear weather had resulted
in an increase of artillery firing in va-
rious sectors. "A surprising advance"
between Sufita and Putna valleys made
by the German forces resulted in the
taking of a hostile position and the
capture of 230 prisoners, and one ma-
chine gun, the statement declared.
Kaiser Mustache Club Organized
Barberton, O., Jan. 19.-It seems
both fitting and just that the first
"Kaiser's Mustache club" in the
United States should be formed here
in Barberton. To which the barber of7
Barberton agrees. Teti Barberton men
organized it, and the only qualification+
for membership is a mustache a la
Wilhelm. The club is, one might say,
a growing institution.

CANAA TO FIGHT TILL
ABIDING PEACE GERTAIN
SO SAYS DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE IN
SPEECH AT CONVENING OF
DOMNION'S PARLIAMENT
Ottawa, Can., Jan. 19.-Canada's de-
termination to continue the war until
crowned with an abiding peace was
expressed by the Duke of Devonshire,
governor-general of the dominion, in
his speech before the convening parlia-
ment today.
"In common with the rest of the
empire," the governor-general de-
clared, "the people of this dominion
are firmly resolved that this war,
which has entailed so much sacrifice,
shall be continued and the forces
strengthened until they are crowned
with an abiding peace. When peace
is again happily restored I am con-
fident that the vast resources of the
dominion will continue to be devel-
oped for the lasting benefit of the em-
pire and in the best interest of liberty
and humanity. Although nearly two
and one-half years have elapsed since
the outbreak of the war, yet that period
has not been more than sufficient for
the enormous preparations necessary
to enable our empire to throw its full
strength into the struggle. The events
that have transpired since the war be-
gan give testimony of the efficiency of
the measures thus taken and bear
splendid tribute to the valor and hero-
ism of his majesty's forces in every
theater of war." r
In relation to the war the governor-
general said: "With preparations al-
ready so ample and still increasing
we may confidently anticipate that the
not distant future will bring such suc-
cess to the allied forces as will as-
sure the full maintenance of the pur-
pose and ideals for which we have en-
gaged in this war." The governor-
general declared the Canadian forces
dispatched overseas during 1916 num-
bered more than 165,000 and the ag-
gregate of enlistment in Canada since
the outbreak of the war is nearly 400-
000.
WILSON ADOPTS T. R.s TACTICS
President to See Congressmen En
Masse Rather Than Individually
Washington, Jan. 19.-The Roose-
veltian practice of seeing a maximum
number of congressmen in a minimum
space of time, has been adopted by
President Wilson. Members of con-
gress aren't very keen about the ney
system.
Instead of going in individually and
spending from five minutes to half an
hour with the president alone, repre-
sentatives and senators now go into
the president's office in a group of
from three to 20. Roosevelt adopted
this practice when he was president.
The president passes from one to
the other disposing of all of them in
jig time, as compared with the old
system. In addition the president sees
his callers now in the afternoon, mak-
ing it even more difficult for congress-
men to get in, for they have to leave
the floor of the capitol in order to
confer with the executive.
But the president is behind in his
work and he has to clear up the cal-
lers quickly in order to get to the
stack of government papers piled high
on his desk.
S'wft and Company Chemist Lectures
Dr. William D. Richardson, chief
chemist for Swift and company, spoke

on "The Hydrogenation of Oils." last
evening at 8 o'clock in the aiphithea-
ter of the Chemistry building. Dr.
Richardson outlined the theory, the
history of development and the conduct
of the hydrogenation process. Among
other things it was pointed out that
by this process Crisco, the lard sub-
stitute, is made from linseed oil and
that fish oils may be rendered oderless.
Place Watchmen in Charge of Potatoes
Denver, Colo., Jan. 1 9.---A de luxe
special train of 54 cars of Colorado
potatoes, valued at $25,000, left here
today under guard for eastern points.
A special watchman is in charge of
each car. The shipments are dc'stined
to Kansas City, St. Louis, Chicago,
Peoria, Cleveland, and other eastern
cities.

!K A T1IN K A "

wec Unless Otherwise Specified.
Phone 296-M.
Fri .-igJulius Steger in "The Stolen Tri-
umiph"; Drew Comedy.
Sat. -20 - Antonio Moreno and Naomi
Chidr sin "heDevil'sPrize."~te
Childrv.-Ws Matinee, 2 P. M. "Letter
to Uncle Sam." "Bringing Home the
Pup," "Willie's Sacrifice."
Mon.-Tae..Wed.-22-23-24-Mary Pickford
in "The Pride of the Clan." 25c.

k

Orpheumn Theatre
Matinee. 21: o : :o3; Evening, 6:45,
8:, 9:30._
Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Sat.-2o-Bessie Barriscale in "A Corner
in Colleens." Also Triangle Comedy
15c.
Sun .Ion).21i." arguerite Cark in
"Miss George Washington." Also
Holmes Tra,.eis. 15c.
Tues.-23-Douglas Fairbanks in "Ameri-
can Aristocracy." Also Triangle Com-
edy 15c.

.I

T 0 D A Yti H a NTiR
T 0 D A Y (Matinee and Night)

An Unusual

Musical Comedy. Direct from 200 performances Longacre
Theatre, New York.

r" """.

T"'

J I

Mat.
Wed. & ,Sat.

6
! i

I

Sho At 3.00,E6z30: 8.oo; 0:30

What we .
do to Hats ~rr\

Sheehan & Co.

We make hats
We sel hats at retail
We carry a big stock
We have the latest all the time
We shape hats to fit the head
we clean and reblock fhats
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Next to the Delta
Cor. Packard and State
IC1HIGAX BREAKS EVEN IN
ANNUAL DEBATE CONTESTS
(Continued from Page One.)
enues front the inheritance tax had
annual deficits.
"oward '1'. Hill, the last speaker for
Chicago, presented the affirmative plan
for the proposed tax reforms, which
included the levying of a tax varying
from 10 to 25 per cent on both col-
lateral and direct heirs, whereas the
states were confining their inheritance
taxation solely to the collateral heirs.
Hill also contended that the difference
in the rates of the inheritance taxation
among the various states often re-
sulted in the loss of much revenue be-
cause of its easy evasion.
W. T. Adams, '17, closed the debate
for Michigan's negative trio. Adams
reiterated the negative arguments that
the federal taxation of inheritances
was unnecessary and that this should
be delegated solely to the states. The
issue here became a clear-cut and de-
cisive one and clearly shifted to the
question of the relative need of the
states and tho federal government, the
negative attempting to prove their case
by the submission of 30 letters from as
many states, all of which were unani-
mous in their condemnation of the fed-
eral legislation, declaring that it would
mean the abolishment of the state in-
heritance tax.
Spirited Rebuttal.
The rebuttal work was as spirited
as the constructive arguments. All
the speeches centered about the main
issue as to whether or not the levying
of such a tax by the federal govern-
ment would be harmful and injurious
to the states that were using it as a
means of raising state funds, or wheth-
er the tax levied by the federal gov-
ernment would not only mean in-
creased revenue to the federal govern-
ment but also would not conflict with
the state tax, Michigan contending the
former and Chicago the latter.
Registrar A. G. Hall was the presid-
ing officer and the judges were Judge
J. A. Barber of Toledo, O.; Professor
0. C. Lockhart of Columbus, O., and
Prof. L. C. Ward of Fort Wayne, Ind.
Each of Michigan's debaters will be
initiated into Delta Sigma Rho, the

C. W. CRAhAM, Mgr.

I

By the autnors and composers of1 Adele" and "Alma"
CAST OF ABSOLUTE DISTINCTION
Beth Groves-Young, Willis Claire, Betty Barnell, Fred Frear, Geraldine
Malone, Tom Collins, Clara Thrupp, Leland Stearns, Jewel Taylor, Marc
1E. Dorsey, Bertram Parry, Harry Marks, Angelo Romeo, and other
Musical Comedy Favorites.
Singing Organization of Special Merit. Scenic Splendor
Gorgeous Costumes, Attractive Clever Girls Galore.

GARRICK
DETROIT

Week of
Jan. 15

ALL THIS WEEK

PRICES:-50c,75o.$1.OO Matinee

50c-75c-$1.50 Night

7

national honorary debating and ora-
torical fraternity. They will also be
accorded a testimonial of $50 and the
Alger gold medal, given annually in
the Central league by Mrs. Alger, wife
of the late Senator Alger.
Ray K. Immel of the oratory depart-
ment had charge of the training of the
debate squad this year, training, both
the team which met Chicago and the
affirmative trio which last night won
from Northwestern university in
Evanston, Ill.
Michigan's band enlivened the oc-
casion of the debate last night with
Michigan music, playing several selec-
tions before the debate began. This
is the sepond year that the debate has
been he d under the recently adopted
plan of opening the debates free to all
the students and the public. This year
over 2,500 people heard the debate.
THAW STILL IN PRECARIOUS
CONDITION SAY PHYSICIANS
Philadelphia, Jan. 19.-Harry K.
Thaw is still in a precarious condition
today, it was announced at St. Mary's
hospital, where the Pittsburg million-
aire has been since he slashed his
throat and wrist with a razor.
Physicians had looked for Thaw to
have recovered by this time, but they
acknowledge today that he is worse
than four days ago. Mrs. Thaw re-
mains constantly at Thaw'sbedside.
Thaw is not permitted to talk and it
is declared he can give no statement
to the authorities for several weeks at
least.
Fined $60 for Hiding Son in Raid
London, Jan. 19.-Mrs. Sarah Ashby,
who couldn't bear to let her son
Arthur enlist in the army, was fined
$60 for concealing him when detec-
tives raided their home and found Artie
under the bed.

CHOOSE DEBATERS IN FINAL
ELIMINATIONS THIS EVENING
Teams Which Will Meet Illinois and
Wisconsin to Be Picked
After Speeches
Six debaters and two alternates who,
will compose the two teams which
will meet Illinois and, Wisconsin in
the annual Mid-west league detates.
will be chosen in the final eliminations
to be held at 8:30 o'clock tonight in
room 302 Mason hall.
Each speaker will be given eight
minutes for his constructive speechi
and this will be followed by four min-
utes of rebuttal work. Each contest-
ant will also be required to present a
brief for the side on the question on
which he is to speak in the tryouts.
Twelve contestants will speak in the
order in which their names appear,
their positions having been decided by
lot.
The affirmative speakers are: C. E.
Hutton, '17, J. R. SimI(on, '18, R. W.
Ward, '18, H. F. Massnick, '18, and
L. W. Lisle, '17L. The negative speak-
ers are: S. D. Frankel, '17L, .R. E.
Kahle, '17, L. B. Harper, '18L, P. A.
Miller, '17L, H. B. Teegarden, '17, N
D. Ireland, '18L, and A. P. Bogue, '1P.
Olhinger, '02L, Writes on Pro- xrmangr
Gustavus A. Olhinger, '99, ZO2L, has
written a little book, "Thieir True
Faith and Allegiance," in which he
discusses the activities of German,
propagandists in this country. This
in large measure is a reprint of ant
article wich appeared in the Atlantic
Monthly. This volume is one of a'
series on "Our National Problems" of-
which Owen Wister's "Pentecost of
Calamity" was the first.
There is opportunity in Micbtga
want ads.

ST HERE IS ONLY ONE

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