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January 20, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I 1£ I" £vil.lA £AV 'A lI4 VC1 L 1

ductor did with a New York chauffeur.] morrow evening.

0 * * * 0 *

Is Man of Genius
Director Dr. Karl Muck, Boston Sym-
phony, Has Reached Highest
of Achievement
Dr. Karl Muck, conductor of the
Boston Symphony orchestra, which
will give a concert in Hill auditorium
on Jan. 26, is one of the most interest-
ing personalities in the world of mu-
sic and a conductor of veritable
genius. He came to America in the
fall of 1906 on a year's leave of ab-
sence granted him personally by the
German emperor. This leave of ab-
sence was extended through the sea-
son of 1907-08. At the end of that
season he was recalled to Germany
and went on condition that he be per-
mitted to return at the end of his
engagement in Berlin. During the fol-
lowing four years, the orchestra had
as its conductor that admirable mu-
sician and leader, Max Fiedler of Ham-
burg, and in the fal of 1912 Doctor
Muck returned for a term of years.
Doctor Muck has wrought wonders
with the orchestra. Fine as it was
before, it has reached a height of
achievement greater than ever before
in its history and under his leader-
ship it has attained a popularity that
is unique. He is a man of stern dis-
cipline, a man of wide culture, and at
the same time has an imagination.
Ypsilanti Normal Graduates to Meet
All former students of Ypsilanti
Normal who are now enrolled in the
University will meet at 7:30 o'clock
tonight in Newberry hall. Some of
the normal faculty will be present. A
program has been prepared.

4.
*

AT THE THEATE
TODAY
Whitney - "The Girl
Smiles."

* * 4
RS4*
*
*
*
Who *
*

Majestic-Vaudeville.
Orpheun--Bessie Barriscale in
"A Corner in Colleens." Also
Triangle Comedy.
Arcade - Antonio Iforeno and
Naomi Childers in "The Devil's
Prize."

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

AT THE WHITNEY

"Acknowledges no debt to 'The
Merry, Widow'," "Filled with many
novel features,""Genuine melodic hit,"
"Witty lines, humorous situations,
pepper Tor seasoning," "One of the
hits of the season, filled with laugh-
ter;" "Joyously tuneful," Exceptional-
ly good cast, plenty of agreeable dance
music." "One of the best light operas
seen in years," "Will attract thou-
sands of lovers of good melody;" these
are some of the thoughts indulged in
by the New York press critics, and
should convey an idea of the value of
"The Girl Who Smiles" ,the musical
comedy upon which these favors were
bestowed.
"The Girl Who Smiles," with the
original beautiful scenic and costume
production, a cast of utter responsibil-
ity, and a highly trained chorus con-
taining many attractive girls will be
presented here at the Whitney theater
this afternoon and evening.

AT THE ARCADE
The Arcade has a feature today with
two well known stars, Antonio Mereno
and Naomi Childers in the Vitagraph
photoplay, "The Devil's Prize." Both
of these stars are greatly admired by
moving picture fans and critics who
know good acting and recognize all
those artistic elements which go to
make up the better class of screen
productions.
Mary Pickford will come in her sec-
ond big special feature, "The Pride of
the Clan," next Monday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday. Critics everywhere seem
to be unable to find enough big force-
ful adjectives to adequately praise and
do full justice to the work of this
noted actress in 'The Pride of the
Clan."
It is said this new play far surpass-
es "Less Than the Dust," her first big
feature.
DISCUSS GENERAL DAM BILL
President Wants Water Power Legis-
lation Before March 4
Washington, Jan. 19. - President
Wilson made one of his sudden visits
to the capitol building today to gather
some odds and ends of legislation and
to discuss the general dam bill.
The president particularly urged
some kind of water power legislation
before March 4. This was taken to
mean he does not want an extra ses-
sion. Senator Stone, chairman of the
senate foreign relations committee,
was summoned to the president's of-
fice for a ten-minute conference.
Tau Sigma Delta Elects C. W. Attwood
Tau Sigma Delta, honorary archi-
tectural and landscape design frater-
nity, has elected to membership
Charles W. Attwood, '17A.

You Must Enlist
OrV e Insulted
"Why Aren't You in the Army," Eng-
land's Favorite Taunt Dur-
ing War Thaes
By J. W. Pegler
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
London, Jan. 10.-(By mail.)--"Why
aren't you in the army?"
Next to calling a man a German,
that is the favorite insult, amount-
ing to "fighting words," now in use in
London. The civilian hasn't much
chance of a come-back except with
his fists, so if he retorts at all it is
usually with his right.
The waiter with a little gold or
silver stripe on his sleeve, meaning
that he has been shot or gassed,
throws a sneering glance at the civ-
ilian diner. The soup is cold and the
(liner says so.
"The soup isn't cold in the army," is
the waiter's come-back. "Why aren't
you there?"
As the conscription act exempts no-
body without reason,the civilian has
a good legal right to be a civilian.
But he can't go into details about his
tribunal hearing so he scrapes the
waiter's head with the ketchup-bottle.
But the civilian usually gets the worst
of it regardless of whether he suc-
ceeds in punishing his tormenter.
Public opinion just naturally drifts
against him.
It is the same on the street if he
accidently bumps another pedestrian.
lie may apologize, but if resentment
isn't appeased the injured party reels
off the crowning insult. Americans
generally escape because their accent
excludes them from English army con-
sideration. But once in a while some-
one makes a mistake, as a bus con-

"Why aren't you in the army?" de-
manded the conny, after a trivial argu-
ment. The New Yorker's reply was
made to order.
"Sa-ay, listen, Cockney," he said
contemptuously, "My army has licked
yours twice and if they have to do it
again I'll be with 'em."
City News
E. M. Grinnell, instructor in the Eng-
lish department, made a complaint to
police headquarters yesterday that
some center pieces, napkins, and
lunch cloths had been stolen from the
clothesline in the rear of his home at
1219 Forest avenue. Patrolman Stodt
found the missing articles in a neigh-
boring yard where they had been
blown by the wind.
Miss W. Saunders, secretary of the
Ann Arbor Civic association, received
a cut glass fruit dish from the Hor-
ticultural society as a token of its ap-
preciation for her work as secretary
of that organization during the past
year.

I

The Civic association has appealed
to the Michigan Central railroad to
have the train that leaves Detroit at
11:30 o'clock every evening stop in
Ann Arbor instead of going straight
on to Kalamazoo.
Professor to Advise State Geologist
Professors J. E. Reighard, F.' C.
Newcombe, W. H. Hobbs, E. C. Case,
and A. G. Ruthven will accompany
Regent L. L. Hubbard of UIoughton
on a trip to Lansing today where they
will meet with the board of advisors

The municipal moving picture film
"Ann Arbor Days," in which a num-
ber of University students participated,
will be shown in Allegan, Mich., Jan.
26 and 27. Supt. G. J. Jenner of the
public schools of Pontiac, Mich., has
applied to the Civic association for the
use of the film in the schools in that
city.
The annual banquet of the Mer-
chants' Credit association and Busi-
ness Men's club will be held Feb. 1.

sing.

to the state geologist to outline the
Leslie W. Lisle, '17L, will give read- work in geology for the coming year.
ings from the works of the late James
Whitcomb Riley at the meeting of the Films developed and printed in 8
Students' society of the Unitarian hours at the Kodak Florist. Arcade,
church to be held at 6:30 o'clock to- S. State St. sun
When You Get Up Late
U. OF M. RESTAURANT
620 LIBERTY STREET
OUR COMBINATION BREAKFASTS WILL SURPRISE YOU

If

That

JHop

For the night luncheon,
hot or cold, and for
refreshments, any hour,
phone,
The Grill Room
(Under Huston's)

YOUR EYES and' YOUR EXAMS
To do justice to your examinations you must do Justice to your eyes.
Our scientific drugless eye examination reveals exact refractive error,
our properly made glasses corrects it, insuring you the maximum efficiency
comfort and results.
NO "DROPS''-NO GUESS WORK-No Inconvenience.
Glasses made in our own shop. Lenses duplicated.
Arnold Optical Service is recognized by all as being the Best Service.
E M I L H A R NOLD
OPTOMETRIST~- OPTICIAN
With Arnold & Co.. Jewelers 220 South Main Street
You Know
what the name Manhattan means when talking of shirts. No
other shirt can approach it in wearing and fitting qualities.
Twice a year we hold a sale on these shirts and this is one of
the occasions. Take heed of these reductions:

Of

MID-WINTER SALE

Bostonian and Florsheim Footwear
With shoe prices soaring, and many styles costing more today
at wholesale than we are asking at retail, it would be folly to
reduce the prices of a single pair except that we are badly
overstocked on some lines; and with spring shipments soon due
to arrive we must reduce our present stock.

CAMPUS BOOTERY

308 So.
State St.

I

IMMEDIATE

- FREE DELIVERY

ALLMAND & FORSYTH E

215 So.
Main St.

We cater to Luncheon
Parties, day or night.
PERFECT SERVICE
FREE DELIVERY

P. S.-By buying at this sale will enable you to save from
$1.00 to $2.00 per pair on your spring footwear for without a
doubt prices are going much higher.

Phone
1748-R

I

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Some Fellows
Get Cold
They don't seem to be able to stand the ice and
snow. They try to, poor chaps, but don't enjoy
themselves. Why is it? Not enough blood per-
haps. The furnace inside isn't working right. May-
be it hasn't the proper sort of fuel to work on.
There's a lot in this!
Shredded Wheat
is good for sluggish furnaces. It's a good fuel. It
contains no slate or slag. Everything in it has food
value. The sort that builds the body and creates
an inner warmth with which to combat icy blasts
of winter. Furthermore it possesses another vir-
tue. It is extremely pleasant to eat- satisfyingly
crisp and of a delicious flavor. It is always fresh,
always clean, always welcome at any time of day
or night. Give it a try out. It will qualify.

7 Y

$ 1.75 shirts
2.25 shirts
2.50 shirts
2.75 shirts
3.00 shirts
3.50 shirts
4.00 shirts
4.50 shirts
5.00 shirts
6.00 shirts
8.00 shirts
10.00 shirts

.$1.35

1.65
1.95

a ,
All the Famly
are

.................1.95
.................195
.................2.85
................. 2.85

3.85

.................3.85
... ............ 4.45
... . . . . . . 5.45
... . . . . . . 6.45

You need a shirt, but a Manhattan
Reule-Conlin-Fiegel Co.'
The Big Store
200-202 Main Street

9 TI TT

ES R .

5Fow attheleaing theatr
ALL METRO PICTURES HAVE FIRST RUN
THE ARCADE THEATRE

The Shredded Wheat Co.

Niagara Falls, N. Y.

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