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January 20, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-20

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ER ANDa
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DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

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L. XXVIL No. 82.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1917.

PRICE FIVE Cl

r I

MILITARY CLASS
SANCTIONED AT
REGENT MEETING,

ARMY OFFICER TO
PROFESSORSHIP
VERSITY

FILL NEW
IN UNI-

GIFTS RECEIVED
TWO MEMORIAL

FOR
FUNDS

Board Accepts Resignations Tendered
by Prof. Tomlinson Fort and
Prof. Albert Bennett
Military training is to make its of-
ficial debut at the University.-
After a year of agitation on the
question, the board'of regents at its
meeting yesterday authorized Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins to make ap-
plication immediately to the war de-
partment for the detail of a United
States army officer to fill the chair of
professor of military science inrthe
University, which will be created as
the result of the regent's action.
The action followed the signatures
of 96 engineering, 28 literary,two med-a
ical, and one graduate student to a
statement that they would elect
courses in military training if they
were established in the University.
Under the war department's general
orders number 48, as amended, 100
men have to signify their willingness
to take the courses before an army
officer will be detailed to a university.
Establish New Memorials.
Two gifts were accepted by the
board. One is a donation from Mary
E. Turner, to b known as the Mary E.
Turner memorial fund. It is to be
administered by the president of the
University and the dean of women, and
is to be used as a loan fund for women
students above the rank of freshmen.
The other present is to be known as
the George Clark Caron memorial
fund, established through the gift of
Dr. George C. Caron, and Mrs. Caron,
in memory of their son, George C.
Caron, a student of the University
who met his death by accidental
drowning last summer. Caron would
have been a senior law student this
year.
The resignation of Prof. Tomlinson
Fort of the mathematics department
was accepted by the regents with re-
gret. Professor Fort leaves the Uni-
versity to become the head of an Ohio
school. The regents also. granted a
request by Prof. Filbert Roth of the
forestry department that a trip to
Asheville, N. C., be made for the study
of forestry. Prof. L. J. Young will
be in charge of the expedition, and the
regents will assure his expenses.
At the meeting Prof. Albert Bennett
of the English department of the En-
gineering college also tendered his
resignati'n, which was accepted. Pro-
fessor Bennett will leave the Univer-
sity to assist in the publication of the
Chaucer Concordia, financed by the
Carnegie Institute of Washington, D.
C. The work will be edited under th
supervision of Prof. J. S. P. Tatlock,
formerly of the University of Michi-
gan. but now teaching at Leland Stan-
ford university.
The board approved the publication
by the Graduate school of Prof. R. M.
Wenley's biography of George S.
Morris at a cost not to exceed $1,000,
with the stipulation that the proceeds
from the sale of the publication are
to be used for the University.
The board made a transfer of funds
in the summer school budget to pro-
vide for a course in automobile engi-
neering to be given during the summer
session. This action followed demands
on the part of graduates from engi-
neering colleges and men in the auto-
mobile industry who have not had a
technical training, who have only the
opportunity to pursue work of this na-
ture during the summer months.
REPORT SAYS GERMAN RAIDER
IS AIDED BY ANOTHER VESSEL
Washington, Jan. 19.- Confidential
reports to the government today indi-
cated that the German raider is assist-
ed by one other vessel which was

converted after her capture. The in-
formation came from South America.
Owing to the fact that it is not au-
thenticated and publication of actual.
facts in such case would be regarded
as unneutral the complete facts as to

T'War ride 'Stock
Makes Big Break
Bethlehem Steel Common Fai 1rom
$30 Per Share to $400 on
Stock Exchange
New York, Jan. 19.-Bethlehem steel
common, the "war bride" stock, which
jumped from $30 to $700 as a result of
munitions orders, broke $30 a share
to $400 on the stock exchange this aft-
ernoon. That a director's meeting
Tuesday will not vote an increase in
the dividends rate of the company was
the tip on which bears raided the
stock. Charles M. Schwab plans to
spend .$100,000,000 on new construc-
tion which will involve a bond issue
according to public reports.
LEAK INQUIRYHD
INTEREST IN CPITAL
MRS. VISCONTI WILL TESTIFY
BEFORE PACKED HOUSE
ON MONDAY
By J. P. YODER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Jan. 19.-Possessing all
the thrills, sensation and mystery of
a first class murder trial, the con-
gressional inquiry into the leak of
advance information of the president's
note to belligerents promises new and
even more startling developments to-
day. When the rules committee re-
sumes next Monday it will play to
packed houses. Ticket applications
have been received from everyone in
Washington who can get the day off
to hear the spicy gossip Mrs. Ruth
Thomason Visconti is expected to re-
late. Applicants include elite Wash-
ington society.
Mrs. Visconti's testimony is expected
to bring to light the "second woman
in the case" provided she is given the
liberty of a full statement. The sec-
ond woman, whose name has been
mentioned only in hearsay rumors, is
said to have resigned a responsible
position after a break with Mrs. Vis-
conti with whom she had been very
friendly.
WILSON OLDEST PRESIDENT
U. S. HAS HAD IN 60 YEARS
Washington, Jan. 19. - President
Wilson is the oldest executive to pre-
side over the destinies of the United
States for the last 60 years. When
he is inaugurated for the second time
March 5, he will be 60 years old, a
span of years that no president has
crossed since the inauguration of Bu-
chanan in 157.
Incidentallythe president is one of
the six oldest executives ever in the
White House. Previous to 1861 the
men chosen to hold the reins of gov-
ernment generally reached a late
period in life before their election.
John Adams was 61 years old when
inaugurated in 1797; Jackson also
was the same age when first inaug-
urated in 1829. Benjamin Harrison
was the oldest man ever chosen for
the presidency, being 68 at the time
of his inauguration in 1841. Taylor
was 64 and Buchanan 65, respectively,
when they were inaugurated.
Aside from these, all presidents have
been younger than Woodrow Wilson
when entering the White House. This
has been particularly noticeable in the
last 50 years, when all executives have
been comparatively young. Theodore
Roosevelt was the youngest president
ever inaugurated in this country, be-

ing but 42 years of age when he took
office.

REGRETS CALLING
OFFR. R STRIKE
W. G. Lee, Leader of Strikers, Pro-
tests Against" Preventive -
Legislation
BELIEVES ANOTHER NATION-
WIDE LAY-OFF IEPROBABLE
Says Railroad Heads Will Fight for
Years to Prevent Enforcement
of Adamson Law
. _ .-.I.
Washington, Jan. 19.-Regret that
the railroad brotherhoods rescinded
the strike order of last summer which
resulted in the passage of the Adam-
son eight-hour law was expressed to-
day by W. G. Lee, president of the
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen.
He protested to the house interstate
commerce committee against passage
of strike prevention legislation.
Lee in an impassioned statement de-
clared: "I believe we will never have
another nation-wide strike." He said
there may be small intermittent strikes
but never one involving all employees
of railroads from coast to coast. "I
wish to God I had never recalled the
strike order," Lee said. The trainmen
are sitting idly by like good citizens
while the railroad heads are fighting
the Adamson law in the supreme court.
It has not done us any good. They are
threatening to keep up their fight for
years to prevent its enforcement."
Lee declared he had never initiated,
nor advocated passage of the law. The
brotherhood, he said, merely accepted
the president's invitation. Arbitration
committees of four laboring men and
four representatives of the employers
appointed by the president to settle
labor disputes, was advocated by Lee.
TAKES 20 MINUTES TO
EXHUST SECOND SAE

COASTING MAY
CAUSE ARRESTS
City police officials yesterday
issued an order to the effect
that if University students did
not discontinue coasting in front
of the University hospital that
arrests of the guilty parties
would be made. The city ordi-
nance permits coasting on only
three streets in Ann Arbor,
Broadway, Felch, and South
Seventh streets.
MAY USE HONOR SYSTEM
IN INDVDA LSSES
PLAN TO HAVE FACULTY AND
MEMBERS OF COURSES
MAKE DECISION
"Contrary to an opinion prevailing
upon the campus, the recent vote taken
by the student council was not for the
purpose of installing an honor system,
but to determine whether or not a suf-
ficient majority deemed such a system
possible and would lend their support
to such a movement. This is the pur-
port of a statement issued, to The.
Daily last night by a member of the
council.
A system is being worked out and
it is thought that the student council
at their meeting tomorrow will formu-
late an adequate plan, which, with the
consent of both faculty and students,
will be put in operation at the coming
examinations.
At the close of the meeting, letters
explaining the details of the proposed
honor system will be sent to all mem-
bers of the literary faculty, asking
whether they think it practicable and
are willing to lend their aid toward
its establishment. At the same time
the plan as adopted will be published
in The Daily.
Within the coming week, those fac-
ulty men willing to support the move-
ment will leave its acceptance or re-
jection to a vote of the students in
their several courses. Two-thirds of
the class will decide the vote. In all
probability, similar letters will be
sent to the dental and pharmic fac-
ulties within a few days.
One campus society has already
pledged itself to carry out the ideals
which will be embodied in the honor
system as drawn up and it is possible
that many more will follow suit.
To Dance! What
Nan Would Do!

t t

* REMAINING HOP TICKETS
* FOR JUNIOR CLASS ONLY
* ___

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

In as much as the J-hop is
primarily a junior party, the com-
mittee wishes to announce that
the remaining tickets will be sold
this morning, beginning at 9
o'clock, to members of that class
only. The decision was reached
by the committee after due delib-
eration as the only just thing to do.
(Signed) WALDO M. M'KEE, '18E,
General Chairman of the J-hop.
* * * * * * * * * * * *

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

*
*

STUDENT STAY IN LINE
ChANCE TO BUY J-HOP
TICKETS TODAY

MICHIGAN BREAKS EVEN IN DEBATE
WINNING FROM NORTH WESTERN,2-1,
A LOSING CHICAGO CONTEST, 2-

FOR

Twenty minutes after the J-hog tick-
et sale opened yesterday noon, every
one of the 150 admittance cards was
gone.
As early as 4:30 o'clock yesterday
morning, students began to line up to
be certain of securing one of the treas-
ured tickets.
By 10 o'clock there was a line reach-
ing almost to State street waiting
patiently for the sale tostart. When
the sale was over many men were dis-
appointed, as the supply did not
nearly equal the demand.
At 9 o'clock this morning, the re-
maining tickets will be put on sale to
jgniors only, although 15 cardboards
have been reserved for members of the
faculty who may wish to attend the
party.
Immediately after the committee an-
nounced that all of the 150 tickets
were gone today, men started lining
up for today's sale. One man would
stand in line for a few hours and then
be relieved by a friend who would take
his turn at the cold job. At an early
hour last evening approximately 25
were in line prepared to stay out the
night. Several students brought their
automobiles with them, intending to
use them as a bed for the night.
The J-hop committee wished to cor-
rect a mis-statement made a few days
ago. Punch bowls and dishes will not
be furnished at the party, but all re-
freshments for the booths will be
taken care of by the committees.
CANADIAN SAYS COUNTRY HAS
DONE ENOUGH FOR ENGLAND
Ottawa, Jan. 19.-One of the greatest
political sensations in Canada for
many decades has been created by the
campaign speech of Lucien Cannon,
who is opposing Honorable A. Sevigny,
in the Dorchester county election. The
statementin--ectis_. ."J..7 ..41.rnt-anaIlab

HONOR PROF. PAWLOWSKI AT
FAREWELL CLASS BANQUET
Prof. F. W. Pawlowski of the En-
gineering college was the guest of
honor at a farewell banquet given last
night at Mack's tea room by the class
in aeronautics. Professor Pawlowski
has been granted a year's leave of ab-
sence during which time he will act
as chief engineer of the aeronautic
division of the United States army. On
Feb. 8 he will read a technical papert
at the aeronautical exhibition in Newt
York. The subject of the paper willt
be "Evolution of Biplane Trussing."p
Jose M. Jiminez, Famous Pianist, Diesi
Berlin, Jan. 19.-Death of the famous
pianist Jose Manuel Jiminez, Berroa,
was reported from Hamburg today. Her
has long been ill. Jiminez was aJ
friend of Franz Liszt and was born ins
Trinidad, Cuba.
No Aviators Sentt
Over Border Line
Western Department Failed to Ask fort
Permission; Washington Grants
Such Expedition{
Washington, Jan. 19.-That aviatorse
were not sent to search for ColonelI
Bishop and Lieutenant Robertson,I
missing army flyers lost in the Lowera
California deserts for a week after1
the disappearance of the men, was ad-
mitted at the war department this aft-I
ernoon. The delay was due to the
western department not asking per-
mission for a search by airmen acrosst
the international line, it was explained.-
The department here gave oraers;
for a search by air as soon as it was
learned the men were missing. Army
men explain here further today that
the fact that the western department
did not send out airmen in search of
their brother flyers was because the{
searchers hadnoteconsidered the
utility, of such searching parties."
Search by automobile, horseback and
otherwise by land, it was stated, had
been immediately organized.
The air search was ordered by
Washington immediately after the
plight of the missing airmen became
known. The rule against crossing the
Mexican border is in line with well1
recognized international rules and in
keeping with the department's stand-
ing order not to send troops across the
border without special orders. "Gen-
eral Bell could give permission to send
out aviator searchers a few hours after
making the request," said one official,
"so it was merely a question of asking
permission."
POSTPONE LECTURE
Wooster University President Unable
to Speak Sunday Night
Dr. L. E. Holden, president of the
University of Wooster, who was ex-
pected to speak at the Presbyterian
church Sunday night, sent word to
Rev. L. A. Barrett, pastor of the
church, that he would be unable to be
present in Ann Arbor for the Sunday
evening services owing to the serious
Illness of his wife. Doctor Holden in
his telegram mentioned no future date
when he would be able to come to Ann
Arbor.

NORTHWESTERN WINS ANNUAL
AFFAIR ON JUDGES'
DECISIONS
EIGHTH VICTORY FALLS
TO MIDWAY SPEAKERS
Clear-Cut Issues Reached on Both
Sides of Question; Tax Ex-
periences Quoted
RESULTS OF DEBATES *
* Michigan affirmative wins two to *
* one from Northwestern. *
* Chicago affirmative team wins *
* two to one from Michigan. *
Northwestern affirmative team *
* wins unanimously from Chicago. *
* Northwestern gets votes of four *
* judges, Michigan three, and Chica- *
* go two. *
* * *, * * * * * * * * * *
Chicago university last night in a
close contest defeated Michigan's neg-
ative debating team by a decision of
two to one, making the eighth debate
that Chicago has won in the 20 inter-
collegiate debates which have been
held since the formation of the Cen-
tral Debating league, Michigan win-
ning the other 12.
The debate was on the question,
"Resolved, That the federal govern-
ment should levy a progressive in-
heritance tax, granted that such tax
would be held constitutional." There
was early a clear-cut issue reached
in the question, Michigan's negative
team contending that the levying of
the inheritance tax would injure the
44 states now using that form of taxa-
tion for state purposes. The affirma-
tive team of Chicago centered their
arguments around the assertions that
the imposition of an additional federal
inheritance tax would not come into
conflict with tbe existing state in-
heritance taxestand that thegrowing
demands made upon the federal gov-
ernment to meet the increased ex-
penditures for 'military and ecoiomic
preparedness made the levying of such
a tax necessary, and it was upon this
issue that the debate was fought out,.
Chicago Opens Debate.
Gaylord W. Ramsay opened the de-
bate for Chicago in his constructive
speech, first giving a brief historical
survey of the almost universal applica-
tion of the inheritancettax as a means
of raising revenue both in this coun-
try and abroad. He outlined the rea-
sons that made such a tax necessary,
contending that .the present revenues
accruing from the excise tax and the
tariff were inadequate, and that there
was a deficit in the federal treasury
that could be met only by the adoption
of their proposed measure.
R. M. Carson,17, was the first neg-'
ative speaker, and he devoted his
speech to the outlining of a plan
whereby the federal government could
raise all the additional revenue n eces-
sary, suggesting the further enforce-
ment of the income tax, a tax on ex-
cess profits of corporations, and the
elimination of federal extravagance
He, also, showing the need of the states
for the inheritance tax as now levied,
claimed that the reservation of the
tax to the states alone was absolutely
essential to their 'systems of taxation
Sidney Pedott continued the debate
for Chicago's affirmative case. He
showed the inadequacy of the state
legislation in levying on inheritances
contending that as the jurisdiction o
the separate states could not extend
beyond their own borders, that much
evasion of the state inheritance ta
laws was possible, and that the levy-
ing of such a tax, federal in its scope,
would be much more efficient and re"

sultant of greater revenues.
- Levine Points to Europe.
A. R. Levine, '19L, was the next
speaker for the negative. Levine
pointed out the experiences of Eu-
ropean countries with the inheritance
tax and showed that five per cent was
the maximum amount which could be
levied and collected. He further ad-
vanced the arguments that the federa
government was not in need of in-
creased revenues and that thestates
now deriving a portion of their rev-
(Continued on Page Six.)

Thirty would-be hoppers, sitting in a
row,
Sat around the Union till 1 o'clock or
so.
They had hoped to stay there all
night and be Johnnies-on-the-spot
when the 50 remaining tickets to the
junior affair went on sale at 9 o'clock
this morning. But their best plans
went astray. The Union closed at 1
o'clock. Slowly they filed over to the
Zeta Psi house to pass the remainder
of the night. At 5 o'clock the martyrs
to the Terpsichorean art formed in line
before the Union desk. Their purpose
was almost achieved. The game was
nearly won.
BERLIN ATTACHE SUFFERS
BREAKDOWN; THIRD SINCE WAR
Berlin, Jan. 19.-Lieutenant Angell,
American naval attache to the em-
bassy here, has suffered a complete
breakdown and today was transferred
to a sanitarium to recuperate. He is
the third American embassy official
to be affected since the outbreak of
the war.
Lieutenant Angell arrived here yes-
terday feeling ill. Charles J. Vopicka,
American minister to Roumania, will
remain in Berlin until he communi-
cates with Washington and receives
instructions before, deciding upon
plans for the future.
Baker Speaks at Gen.. Lee Celebration
Lexington, Va., Jan. 19.-The birth
of Robert E. Lee is being observed
here with a celebration today. Sec-
retary of War Newton D. Baker is to
deliver an address.

FEAR MANY

DEATHSI

Loss of Life in Munition Factory Ex-
plosion May Be Heavy
(Bulletin.)
London, Jan. 19.-Considerable loss
of life is feared as the result of an ex-
plosion in the London munitions fac-
tory this evening. No definite esti-
mate of the number dead and seriously
injured was reported.

statement in effect is tt
Thif Phwns Coat, Sends Owner Ticket done enough for Engla:
St. Louis, Mo., Jan. 19.-Burke cannot afford to injure
Sheridan received through the mail a ing anything further.
pawn ticket for his overcoat, which ruin our country fron
had been stolen from a local billiard view of men and wea
parlor. A note written by the thief thing else for Englan
acompanied the ticket. It read: Cannon declared Sir
"Sorry, old man, but was hungry." endorsed his candidacy.

that Canada nas
end and that she
herself by do-
"Are we to'
m the point of
alth and every-
nd?" he asked.
Alfred Laurier

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