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January 19, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COLDER
TODAY

41w i

ait~

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND MIIT
WIRE SERVICE~

PRICE FIVE CENTS

VOL. XXVIL No. 81.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY

19,

1917 .

. ._ ........
.. __._

--
I r . .

RADER'S ACITIY
MAYBHING FORTH
- - WILL TAKE GERMANS T
TASK IF AMERICAN LIVES
ARE LOST
PEACE NOTE WILL
NOT STOP ACTION]
Underwriters Raise War Risk Rates
on Vessels; Two Ships Sail
With Guns on Stern
By Carl 1). Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Jan. 18.-International
complications with Germany will en-
sue if American lives were sacrificed
contrary to international law in the
German raider's activity according to
an official hint to the United Press this
afternoon.
The official indicated peace move-
ments would prevent this government
from taking action if its rights were
invaded. It was suggested that the
threats of trouble between the two
governments might be a club that
would force Germany into line in the
peace moves. Indications show that
the authorities are far from hopeful
about the peace situation at this mo-
ment.
Several state department officials
said this afternoon that no word had
come through official channels con-
cerning the German raid and their
only information concerning Ameri-
cans came from press dispatches.
New 1Yrk, Jan. 18.--Marine under-
writers in New York continued today
to boost rates on ships for South Am-
erican waters where a German com-
merce raider is operating.
War risk rates have leaped from two
to three per cent to six to ten per
cent. With the German raider still at
large, and now reports of ships sunk
coming in today rates were expected
to go even higher. The ships already
destroyed by the raider are valued
with their cargoes at about $10,000,000.
Insurance is carried for the most part
by local underwriters.
The French liner Chicago sailed
from New York today for Bordeaux
regardless of the raider's presence.
She carried 120 passengers. Other
large liners now on the Atlantic and
not yet reported as reaching their
destinations are: Alphonse XII of
Spain; the Saga, bound for Rio de
Janiero; the Brazos, enroute to Porto
Rico: the Sao Paulo, for Buenos Aires,
and the Valdivia.
Pensacola, Fla,, Jan. 18.-Two Brit-
ish vessels, the steamer Indian and the
British schooner Edna V. Pickles, sail-
ed today with three inch rapid fire
guns mounted on their sterns for de-
fense against the new German raider.
The Indian carried grain and a mis-
cellaneous cargo and was bound for
Liverpool.
TODAY LAST OPPORTUNITY TO
FILE LIT ELECTION BLANKS
Today is the last day for the filing
of election blanks for courses to be
elected next semester by students in
the College of Literature, Science, and
the-Arts. A fee of $1.00 will be charged

for all elections made after 5 o'clock
today, at which hour the registrar's
office will close.
Freshmen will not be allowed to
change the courses elected by them
the first semester, nor the hours at
which these courses are taken, without
special permission by the committee of
freshmen advisors. This committee
meets in the registrar's office from
2:30 to 4 o'clock today.

y %
Tom C eid1'7,
TomnC ,i I.<i&
of n a ioiL, at 2 e
afternoeQ, i. ai h110a1,1 Ja.
Park, Detroit, aftr . i ;
or four months.
Reid attend the Unirrs-itr
through the last suramer session. 11
ress preventel i af rom enteng ts h
yeair, during wLhch he expected to
start work in t e M dicao sh eol.
Troulie with his eyes coerncd hi
a darkened roo: )uch of thei Se
during his illness. Shortly efore
Christmas his condition began slightly

ll~l SSTM T
bE IJELN EXMS'
Shtldent Council to Pat New [bin
Into Effect j;unng
1eDABI. I A M S. HA R T, '17, E L CTE D
GOVERNINU BOD 11 I1t1, IT)E11, '
From Offiee
Plans far nutting the b a.nor syst ..rn
in operation at the cQming mid-yea:r
examinations were drawn up at the
meeting of the Student council held
last night. All schools and colleges
which received it favorably will have
an opportunity to take their examina-
tions under its working. A committee
composed of men from the council
and the campus is to draw up the
scheme in its final form.
The students in each course will be
asked at the time of taking exam-
ination, if they wish to do so under
the honor system. If they manifest
their willingness, the examination in
that course will be held under it; if
they are unwilling, the usual proctor1
system will be employed.
Council officers for the coming sem-
ester were elected at the meeting, as
follows: President, A. S. Hart, '17;
vice-president. IT. A. Taylor, '17E; cor-
responding secretary, D. W. Sessions,
'17L; recording secretary, J. A. Till-
ema, Grad.; treasurer, S. S. Attwood,t
'18; auditor, E. C. Schacht, '18E.
Three men are retiring from the
council at this time, R. M. Carson, '17,
rant Cook, '17L, and H. L. Carroll,
'17E.
Demand Apology
From Ambassador

FPRTCE FIVE CENTS
1111 AU1 lIT RiUM SCENE OF TO.
'NIGIRT'S } OlENSIC
1)UEL

S EITNE
SQUA D AT

NAEG ATIVE
EVANSTOT

Debatig tear nwhich meiets Ci ago Tonight

TOM C. Ilii
to improve, but recently the relapse
set in which culminated yesterday aft-
ernoon.
Reid was widely known on the cam-
pus. He was a member of Nu Sigma
Nu medical fraternity, Sigma Delta
Chi journalistic fraternity., riffins,
Sphinx, and Cercle Francais. Last
year he was telegraph editor of The
Michigan Daily, associate editor of The
Wolverine, and member-elct to the
board in control of student public-
tions. le o k i):l' in the French
society's play last spring, and was
active both in chorus and committee
work of the Union] Opera.
Reid is survived by his mother and
his father, Phil. C. Reid, managing
editor -of the Detroit Free Dress, and
his sister, Helen Reid. The funeral
will be held from the residence on
Monday. Interment will be at Mt.
Elliot cemetery.
DEAN M. E. COOLEY INVITED TO
ASTOR RECEPTIOQ TOMORROW
Dean M. E. Cooley of the College of
Engineering is one of the invited
guests at a reception which is being
given to the immigration committee of
the chamber of commerce of the
United States by Mr. and Mrs. Astor
of New York City at their residence
840 Fifth avenue. Several prominent
engineers will attend the reception,
which is to be held tomorrow night.
300 J-Hop Tickets Sold Yesterday
All of the 300 tickets for the junior
hop were sold yesterday afternoon and
when the sales were closed for the
day over 200 juniors were turned away
empty handed.
Today at noon 150 tickets will be
placed on sale for juniors and seniors.
At 9 o'clock Saturday morning the
ticket sale will be thrown open to the
campus at large.

G erman Newspaper Asks Gerard
Resign or Apologize for
Speech

to

PERINSPINSFIGHT,
TO FINISH IiTH G, ,P
LPI(RIRESSIVE II lEADER LINES P
FORCES IN REVOlT':' AGAINS'T
N A TINA L C0311M1T'T'E E
New York, Jan. 18.-George W. Per-i
kins, leader of the Progressive-Repub-
lican, revolt against the Republican
national erecutive committee, started
lining up Progressives all over the
country today in a finish fight on the
national committee. He announced
that he had conferred with Colonel
Roosevelt.
Raymond Robbins, well known Pro-
gressive leader who supported Hughes
during the last campaign, also held a
*onference with Perkins today. He
announced afterward his full and
hearty approval of the protest started
by Perkins and Everett Colby of New
Jersey and their demands for an im-
mediate meeting of the Republican
committee to undo the work done by
the executive committee.
Perkins announced receipt of the
following telegram from Senator-elect
Hiram Johnson of California: "With
your efforts to make the Republican
part Progressive I am in full sym-
pathy and hearty accord. Go to it,
and all Progressives will be with you."
DEMOCRATS SPLIT
OVER LEAK PROBE
G. 0. P. Protest "Dark Chamber Meth-
oad" of Selecting Counsel for
Leak Probe
By J. P. YODER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Jan. 18.-Charges by
Republicans that the Democrats are
employing "dark chamber methods" in
an apparently hopeless split among
themselves over whether they shall
confine their probe strictly to the note
leak or broaden it to unlimited di-
mensions, developed today during a
seven-hour session of the house rules
committee. The Democrats are split
over selection of a counsel for the com-
mittee authorized yesterday by the
house.
Some Republicans strenuously ob-
jected to an "unlimited probe." They
declared a probe at this time of Wall
street, the New York stock exchange
and finance generally, would mean
that the matter of the leak, who was
responsible for it, and if anyone prof-
ited by it, would be smothered because
(Continued on Page Six.)

Explain Skating
Dangers on Huron
Student Council Committee Reportsi
Thin Ice in River Below
Barton Dam
The committee appointed by the stu-
dent council, composed of H. A. Tay-
lor, '17E, and J. L. Whalen, '17E, to
investigate the skating facilities on
the Huron, made the following reportt
last night:i
"Students should be warned againstc
skating on Argo pond and although thet
ice is thick between Argo pond andt
Barton dam, the changes in the levelt
of the river at different times and thet
fact that ice is constantly being cutt
there, makes it advisable for students
to refrain from skating between these
two points also.
"Above Barton dam there is no skat-
ing at present owing to the heavy
snowfall of the past week, but the ice
is nevertheless in good condition andt
there will probably be good skatingt
there by next week. The life preserv-
ers that were put up last summer are
in good condition and could easily be
used in case of accident."
PRAISE BALFOUR'S NOTE AS ,
GREATEST STATE PAPER OF WAR,
By ED. L. KEEN
(United PressDStaff Correspondent)
London, Jan. 18.--Press and public
today unanimously applauded Foreign
Minister Balfour's note to America.
Many editorials characterized the com-
munication as the greatest state pa-
per of the war.
Particularly interesting to the public
was the enthusiastic approval of the
document voiced in the newspapers
controlled by Lord Northcliffe. It was
recalled that in the past the North-
cliffe group of newspapers has been
violently antagonistic to Balfour.
JANUARY NU-3IBER OF GARGOYLE
APPEARS ON CAMPUS TODAY
Timely topics, ranging from the let-
ters of a woman student to sketches of
the skating craze will be dealt with
by the January number of the Gargoyle
which will appear on the campus to-
day. It is claimed by the management
of the magazine that those who read
the coming issue will be freed from
all worries concerning blue books and
hop bills.
The cover is by Reed Bachman, '20,
and depicts a snow scene in brown
and white.

* quired.
* Audience
eated by 8
Michigan's
the year will

is requested to
o'clock.

first varsity debate C
be held in Hill auditor

London, Jan. 18.-American ambass-
ador Gerard is challenged by the
newspaper Deutsches Tageszeitung
either to apologize for his speech be-
fore the German-American chamber of
commerce, or to resign, according to
an exchange telegram dispatch to Rot-
tendam from Cologne.
This is the second time that the
German conservative newspaper has
violently attacked Gerard for his al-
leged indiscretion in lauding the pre-
sent German government officials.
The same dispatch asserted that Ger-
ard had sent a special messenger to
Washington with a formal explanation
of his speech.
NVashington, Jan. 18.- Ambssador
Gerard's recent remarks in Berlin will
go unrebuked and unnoticed, it was in-
dicated today. State department of-
cials denied they had any word from
Gerard offering to resign if his state-
ments were disapproved by President
Wilson.
Senior Lits Hold Big Smoke Fest
Success, spelled with a capital "S"
was the only way to describe the sen-
ior lit "smoke" held last night at the
Union. A rapid fire speech by Dr. Wol-
man of the economics department,
stories told by Obie O'Brien and Hal
Fitzgerald, and selections by a class
quartet furnished the entertainment.

Yeets Northwestern in Second Secti
of Three-Cornered
Argument
* FACTS ABOUT THE DEBATE
Question-Inheritance tax.
* Registrar A. G. Hall presides.
* Michigan band will begin play-
ing at 7:30.
* Teams will come on platform
* at 8 o'clock.
* No ticket of admission is Ire-

be*

*

ium tonight when the Wolverine neg-
ative team will meet the University
of Chicago affirmative trio debating on
the question, "Resolved, That congress
should levy a progressive inheritance
tax, constitutionality conceded." At
the same time Michgigan's negative
team will debate the question in Evan-
ston, Ill., appearing against North-
western university.
No charge will be made for admis-
sion to the debate, for last year the
appropriation by the board of regents
which covered the expenses of the de-
bate had such excellent results that
the regents have continued the policy.
)Not even a ticket will this year be
needed to secure admission, and the
general public as well as the students
is cordially invited to attend.
Registrar A. G. Hall of the Literary
college will be the chairman of the
debate, and the judges are Judge J. A.
Barber of Toledo, O.; Professor O. C.
Lackhart of Ohio State University, and
Professor L. C. Ward of Fort Wayne,
Indiana.
The Varsity band will make its first
appearance since the close of the foot-
ball season to enliven the program
with Michigan music. They will com-
mence playing at 7:30 and the debate
will begin at 8 o'clock.
One Veteran on Team.
The personnel of the team which
will meet Chicago tonight contains but
one former varsity debater. The other
two will participate in an intercol-
legiate debate for the first time when
they line up against Chicago.
The team is captained by W. T.
Adams, '17. Ralph M. Carson, '17, is
the first Michigan speaker, with A.
R. Levine, '19E, completing the lineup.
To Receive Medals.
The Chicago debaters are: Gaylord
W. Ramsay, Sidney Redcott, and How-
ard G. Hill.
A testimonial of $50 will be given
to each member of the teams and in
addition, the Alger gold medal will be
awarded. This medal is given an-
nually to each member of the debate
squads in the Central league debates
by Mrs. Alger in memory of her hus-
band, the late Senator Alger.,
The outcome of Michigan's first de-
bates of the year will be looked for-
ward to with interest. This is the
first year that Professor Trueblood
has not had the active training of the
squads in his hands, he having this
year relinquished the work to his as-
sistant, Mr. Ray K. Immel of the ora-
tory department, whose efforts have
been devoted for the past months to
maintaining the excellent record that
Michigan has made for herself in
forensic activities in the west.

is -_______

1 j,7
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0 D

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O N

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:ALE
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See what happened during vacation

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iohi a
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